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Student Life 

People 

Spiritual Life 

Academics 

Clubs & Organizations 

Music 

Sports 




Olivet 

Nazarene 

University 



One University Avenue, 
Bourbonnais, IL 60914 

www.olivet.edu 

815-939-501 

Driven. 

Aurora 

Vol. 98 



We are 



■ ■ ■ 



inspired, motivated, 

compelled, encouraged, 

persistent, spirited, ambitious, 

pressing on, determined, striving, 

directed, reaching out, focused, 

guided, moving forward, unstoppable. 



DRIVEN 




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'm not saying that I 
have this all 
together, that I have it made. 

But I am well on my way, 

reaching out for Christ, who 

has so wondrously reached 

out for me. 



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Friends, don't get me 
wrong: By no means 
do I count myself an 

expert in all of this, 
but I've got my eye 

on the goal where 
God is beckoning us 

onward-to Jesus. 

I'm off and running, 

and I'm not turning 
back." 

-Philippians 3:13-14 (MSG) 



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■■ 



We must wake up 

every day 

ready to win the fight. 

we must strive to find the way, 

and be proud of the battle 

every night; 

as we follow this path, 

may we start to come alive, 

forever push on, 

and never lose our drive. 



Dedication 



Kristy Ingram 




When choosing someone to dedicate the 
yearbook to. the Aurora staff looks for a staff 
or faculty member who exemplifies charac- 
teristics of selflessness, serving, and influenc- 
ing communities, one person at a time. We 
found all of these criteria, and many more, in 
the character of Knsty Ingram. Kristy to her 
family. Prof. I. to her students, and Kris to her 
friends, is a person full of life and generosity. 

Kristy grew up in Sterling Heights, Michigan 
with her family: her mother Debbie, her father 
Chuck, her older sister Jennifer and her young- 
er sister Melissa. Kristy still makes frequent 
trips to Michigan to visit her sister Jennifer, 
her brother-in-law Dave, and her 17-month- 
old niece Emma Grace. Kristy loves seeing her 
niece grow up to be a bundle of energy and 
love. 

Kristy has said, "my little niece tire-Is} me out 
with all her new words and energy. Innocence 
and wonder in the eyes of a child." 

Growing up. Kristy was full of energy her- 
self. Debbie Ingram says, "Kristy was active, 
curious about everything, always exploring 
and eager to learn." Due to academic motiva- 
tion, the decision to go to college was easy: 
'Olivet evolved from a Nazarene upbringing, 
years of Red Carpet visits, and an older sister 
who preceded her," Debbie says. Kristy spent 
four years at Olivet and was actively involved 
in the English department as a teaching assis- 
tant and made lasting relationships with pro- 
fessors like Dr. Belcher-Rankin. Of Kristy Dr. 
Belcher-Rankin says. "Kristy's best and most 
important quality is her wonderfully authentic 
Christian outlook on life. If informs her generos- 
ity, her compassion for others, both here and 
around the world, and her thoughtful modeling 
of a Christlike walk every day. She deserves 
so much more recognition than she receives 
for all that she does-for all that she is." 

Kristy graduated from Olivet Nazarene Uni- 
versity in 2005 with a degree in English. 

As she moved away from Olivet, Kristy 
found that her time had a significant impact 
on the course that her future began to take. 
Debbie says, "Olivet provided a wonderful 
network of people who encouraged her to 



write, teach, and grow as a person." Kristy 
went on to get a master's degree at 
Governors State University and received her 
TEFL certification from Wheaton College. 

After teaching as an adjunct for one year 
at Olivet in 2003. Kristy made the decision 
to sell almost all of her earthly belongings 
and move and teach in Phnom Penh, Cambo- 
dia. She served for 2 years with ELIC (English 
Language Institute in China), an organization 
dedicated to sending Christians into nations in 
desperate need of English teachers. While in 
Cambodia, Kristy treasured the opportunity 
to pour into the lives of her students and fel- 
low teammates, while also finding deep per- 
sonal growth and fulfi llment in her years spent 
in this foreign country. Beautiful words of 
hope and description such as, "the voice of 
the sea is seductive: never ceasing, whisper- 
ing, clamoring, murmuring, inviting the soul to 
wander for a spell in theabysses of solitude: 
to lose itself in mazes of inward contempla- 
tion" from Kate Chopin's The Awakening, kept 
Kristy motivated in some of her darker, more 
difficult times. The idea of inward contempla- 
tion, the invitations to the soul, and the times 
of solitude have been definitive in Kristy's life 
ever since. Of Cambodia, Kristy wrote in her 
journal, "It's not an escape, or a vacation or a 
hideout. It isn't about being extreme or making 
a point or becoming a martyr. It's about being 
humble, honest, willing, and available. It's about 
hope and love and truth. It's about being a part 
of something much bigger than I could ever 
be myself. It's about giving back the smallest 
portion of what I've received." 

She has lived out these ideas since coming 
back and she has made a sigmfi cant impact on 
the lives of many through her dedication to 
being willing and available. Debbie says, "One 
of the last pictures Kris sent me from Cambo- 
dia was of her feet- how unlikely is that? They 
were dirty, blistered, swollen- evidence of a 
long journey- a journey takes one step at a 
time to make an impact that would outlive her 
two years of service." 



Since coming back from Cambodia. Kristy 
has taught college writing, creative writing, 
and business and technical writing at Olivet. 
Her influence as a professor, friend, and co- 
worker has been very significant to many 
people since she started as a full time profes- 
sor at Olivet in 2007. Junior Emily Spunaugle 
says, "I recall sitting in Professor Ingram's of- 
fice a year ago in fears, caught in my percep- 
tion of God's will. I remember being genuinely 
concerned that one single albeit important de- 
cision facing me had the possibility of sever- 
ing me from God's intentions for my life. The 
most memorable moment of the conversation 
was when she asked me who was I to think 
I could destroy God's will irrevocably? Since 
this moment I've never ceased to look for the 
goodness of God that exists independent of 
the actions of my own free will." Senior Jadon 
Huddleston sums up the feeling of many of 
Professor Ingram's students when he says. 
"When I think of Prof. L I think of wisdom and 
leadership. Her servant leadership is by active 
example, and I seriously respect her advice 
and opinions." 

In a letter to Debbie, Kristy wrote. "Mom, be 
proud that I'm rich- not because I have much, 
but because I need little. Be proud that I love 
the unlovable, give to those who cannot give 
back, laugh with those who know tears, go 
where nobody else wants to be. Be proud that 
I can't look away..." 

We honor you Professor Ingram for all you 
choose to be and how you let Christ guide 
your every decision. We appreciate your ex- 
ample and how you have chosen to pour into 
the student body here at Olivet. 

-Kayla Koury 



Dedication 



7 



University President 




Off and Running 



There are many things about Olivet students 
that impress me. They are bright, positive, ener- 
getic, and able to work effectively in groups or as 
individuals. They have a strong sense of service, 
an eagerness to learn ... and they are driven. 

To be "driven" means that there is a strong 
inner desire to succeed and an unwillingness to 
settle for less than the best. This is a particularly 
important characteristic for college students who 
have to juggle so many demands at once: aca- 
demics, work, social life, athletics, family relation- 
ships, spiritual issues and their over-arching plans 
for the future. 

For the person who is driven, the focus is 
always forward. His or her eyes are fi xed on the 
goal. The setbacks of life, which surely come to us 
all, are quickly dismissed as temporary obstacles. 
Drive helps people overcome discouragement and 
keeps them moving in a positive direction. 

But drive alone is not enough to ensure lasting 
significance or success. One can be driven for the 
wrong reasons. Therefore, the key is to link one's 
inner drive with a higher goal. 

In St. Paul's letter to the church in the ancient 
city of Philippi, he gives this word of testimony: 
But one thing I do: Forgetting what is behind and 
straining toward what is ahead, I press on toward 
the goal to win the prize for which God has called 
me heavenward in Christ Jesus (Philippians 3:13-14). 
Notice that the goal is not to simply win a prize or 
be the best. The goal is to win the prize for which 
God has called me heavenward. 



Only when we link our inner drive with God's 
calling are we truly on the pathway to fulfl llment. 
God's purposes help channel one's personal drive 
in the right direction and God's Spirit provides 
added energy in those moments when human 
drive alone is not enough to enable us to be all we 
are called to be. 

In the translation known as The Message, the 
passage from St. Paul reads as follows: "By no 
means do I count myself an expert in all of this, 
but I've got my eye on the goal, where God is 
beckoning us onward-to Jesus. I'm off and 
running, and I'm not turning back". 

As the academic year comes to an end, I can't 
wait to see what will happen in the lives of 
today's ONU students as they complete their ed- 
ucation and move out into the broader world to 
make a difference. They will very soon be "off and 
running" with no intention of turning back. 



- Dr. John C. Bowling 



President 



9 



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Photos by Brent Brooks 









One night in the spring of 2009. three weeks before the end of school, four 

sophomore guys, David Anderson, Steve Olson, Michael Schimp and Matt Compton were messing 

around in the halls of Howe. Friendly competition was the idea and any Kind of ball or Nerf gun was the tool. 

Little did these guys know that this 'horsin around' would turn into a youtube video with over 600.000 views, 

an offer to perform on America's Got Talent, and even a board game modeled after them. 

AA: How did all this start? 

DA: Well, one night we were messin around in the hallway of Howe. It started with a Nerf gun competition down the hall, then a 

basketball down the hall. Then we started trying to bank those off doors and then we got ping-pong balls and made a game out 

of those. 

MC: Yeah, it was more like playing horse with the ping-pong balls. But then the game turned into fl Inning, but with no intent of ever 

doing anything with the video. 

AA: When did you have time to fl Im all of those shots? 

DA: We fl Imed at night, in between classes... 

MC: We fl Imed INSTEAD of classes (smiles) 

DA: The atmosphere was so fun though. Guys would come and watch and eat. It was like we were the nightly entertainment. It was 

start to fl nish, three weeks. 

AA: How many multiples of video shots did you have to do in order to get the ones were you made it in? 
MC: The time varies. There were like, 5 or 6 that were fl rst try shots. 

So: You'd be surprised by some of them that were fl rst try shots... But some tricky ones took weeks. 
DA: We defl antly did get better as the weeks went on though. 

AA: OK, so you fl Im for three weeks. Then what happened? 

SO: Everything. 

DA: We put the video up on youtube... 

MC: Then it just spiraled out of control. 

DA: The fl rst big one to pick up the video was Sports Illustrated. 

SO: The fl rst couple days it made some noise just around campus, but by the second or third day online... 

DA: Sports Illustrated, then ESPN and New York Times... 

MS: And that newspaper... From where Steve? 

SO: Australia. Didn't find that one out till junior year though... 

AA: What was the overall experience like? 
DA: Awesome. 
SO: So fun. 

AA: Did you have any idea any of this would happen? 

(all laugh) 

MC: 10,000 views 

SO: that was the goal 

MC: but we crushed that in 3 or 4 days 

DA: Jokingly I had said. I'm goin for 100,000 views. It's over 600,000 now. 



AA: So what drove you to do this? 

DA: Well, we missed a bunch 

MC: and skipped class. 

SO: Took a lot of shots on Maft's phone and had to do like 15 shots over and over again. That was totally driven. 

DA (laughing): All of my shots were in the fl rst time. 

MC (laughing at David): All edited. Student Lite 



13 



First Week & Move In 



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August 27 th and 28 th . the days of freshmen move-in, held both tears and 
smiles as parents sadly but proudly waved goodbye to their children who were 
excited to embrace their newfound independence. 

For Queen Kisoso. this day was the start of a whole new life in a 
completely new environment. The word "home" to Queen means the African country 
of Kenya. Queen met her roommate for the fi rst time on move-in day and said, "We 
are already friends." 

Queen has ambitions to be a nurse which is a dream that she has possessed 
her entire life. This deep passion has driven this remarkable young woman to move 
to a new country, conquer a strange language, and earn a challenging degree. "I 
looked around and saw need among my people," Queen explained, "I want to take 
care of them." For Queen, and many other freshmen, move-in was an exciting start 
to a brand new adventure. 

- Kim Kratz 





1. The crowd worships as the Spirit fi lis the room. 2, Joey Ramirez uses his 
musical passion to stir up the crowd, (ts) 3. Wes Siscoe lends a helping hand on 
move-in day. (cl) 4. Jacob Barse, a Jump Start mentor, leads by example, (ch) 
5. Mitch Johnson gives a thumbs-up for the freshmen, (ch) 6. Women's soccer 
coach Bill Bahr delivers an inspirational speech to the class of 2014. (ts) 7. Stu- 
dents head to the fi rst chapel of the year, (ts) 8. Katie Hanley and Ben Garcia 
show off their ROTC muscles, (cb) 











9. Michael Hileman shares the load, (cb) 10. A freshman shows his 
love for Jesus during Jump Start, (ts) 11. Emma Reutter smiles' for 
the camera on freshmen move-in day. (cl) 12. Jen Reierson has a 
ball during move in. (ts) 13. Tyson Dodd shreds on his guitar, (ts) 
14. Stephanie Dillman lifts a prayer to the heavens during Jump 
Start, (ts) 15. Angela Rivas helps carry a heavy box for a freshman 
parent, (ts) 16. Chaplain Mark Holcomb leads all school chapel, (ts) 



Student Life 



15 



1 



BacK-to-School Block Party 



I. Students participate in an animated game 
ot Twister, (ch) 2. Kyle Hance enjoys a slice 
of Domino's pizza, (cl) 3. Desiree' Horvat 
poses with her new furry friend at the pet- 
ting zoo. (mr) 4. Connect Four proves to be 
a challenging game, (ch) 5. Students hold 
their breath as they wait to see if the bottle 
will stand, (ch) 6. Michael Bishop braves the 
bungee ride, (ch) 7. The competition is on 
as students race to win first place, (ch) 8. 
Students ponder over their next move, (mr) 
9. This brave girl puts some muscle into 
her swing, (ch) 10. People stop to watch as 
Bryan Stevens gets the party started, (ch) 

II. Matt Van Dyke concentrates as he plays 
one of the carnival games set up around the 
square, (ch) 




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A whirlwind of lively music, delicious smelling food and an impressive array of rides boldly announced Olivet's 
third annual Block Party held in front of Weber Center. 

Savory aromas drew large crowds to taste the variety of food. Students cheered enthusiastically as their friends 
bravely somersaulted on the bungee ride or jumped high in the bounce house, while others put on their best smiles 
to take pictures with the sheep, rabbits, and baby goats at the petting zoo. 

Sophomore Ren Cloutier felt encouraged to step out of her comfort zone and make new friends, noting, "I 
saw a friend of mine who is a junior and he introduced me to fi ve freshmen." 

One aspect of the party that brought friends closer together was the music, and many students could 
agree with sophomore Gabe Nye that this was their favorite part because, "Everyone can relate to someone through 
music." Toward the end of the night, students mingled on the lawn or danced in front of the Weber steps and the 
sound of laughter blended with the melodies of classic and contemporary songs. These were the moments that 
made the evening unforgettable. 





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12. A group of friends works fogefher as fhey play a carnival game, (mr) 13. Who 
says fhaf bounce houses are only for kids? (mr) 14. Owen Blough aims for a perfecf 
hit. (ch) 15. Jameson Forshee is ready fo kick off an amazing weekend, (ch) 16. Who 
will be fhe champion of fhis round? (ch) 17. Joy Mafthews chooses some candy af 
fhe Block Party's sweefesf attraction, (cl) 18. Josh Long feeds one hungry goat, (mr) 
19. Spencer Cook, Phil Hamilton and Billy Ratfhahao eagerly await a win. ( ch) 20. It's 
a race fo see who will reach the top fi rst. (ch) 

Student Life 



17 



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Ollies Follies 



sports and wacky games 




On the night ot the Wacky Games, the stands were over- 
fl owing with supporting students in yellow, green, red and blue. 
Junior Jim Murray exclaimed, "It was the time ot my life!" 

The freshmen, though they were in "A Whole New World,' 
surprised everyone when they won the eating competition. The 
sophomores "Just Couldn't Waif to be King" and Kept their game 
up, coming in second in a few of the events. The juniors were 
"Wishing Upon a Star" that almost led them to victory, but the 
seniors, with their "Dreams of a True Loves Kiss," won the games 
overall. 

Even though the classes were competing against each 
other, the games were full of fun, because ultimately, "We Are All 
in this Together." 



1. Seniors wear their class shirts as they dominate the 
field in wacky games and sports, (ch) 2. Junior girls show 
their teamwork by fi ghting together for the last inner 
tube, (mr) 3. Austin Shaner stuffs his face full of who- 
knows-what. (mr) 4. The freshmen race against the clock 
to get the oily watermelon down the line, (mr) 5. Grant 
Shaw struggles against Michael Cobb for another point, 
(mr) 6. Shannon Battershell ties the handkerchief around 
the rope for tug of war. (ch) 7. Carrie Riegle, Shane Emaus, 
Alexandria Lord and Cole Jensen work together to pull 
the seniors across the line for a win. (ch) 8. Sophomores 
cheer for their classmates during an intense fight for inner 
tubes, (mr) 9. Matt Smith and Kyle Lowry announce the 
games and the rules, (mr) 



- Allyson Vrabel 









10. Juniors Shane Emaus and Danielle Vander Schaff go up for the 
block against the seniors in sand volleyball, (ch) 11. Zak Horvat hits 
the ball out of the field, (ch) 12. Seniors and sophomores battle it 
out in dodgeball. (mr) 13. Jacob Schmidt tosses the fnsbee to this 
teammates for another goal, (bb) 14. Christian Wall, dodges a tackle, 
(mr) 15. David Ginn, Jason Tower and David Brause show some class 
spirit by cheering on their classmates in flag football, (bb) 16. Austin 
Hill reaches for the ball, (mr) 17. A touchdown attempt during the 
senior-freshmen matchup, (mr) 



Student Life 



19 



i^rt 



Ollies Follies Variety Show 





"Wish Upon a Star" was the theme for the 2010 
Ollies Follies variety show. The senior class, assigned 
to portray Disney "royalty." managed to. rather appro- 
priately, take the crown for first place. They brought 
Cinderella, and many other Disney characters, to campus 
and ended the show with a 'proposal.' 

The sophomores also came out swinging and 
landed second place. Under the pretense that Pixar had 
run out of ideas, animated Disney characters from Nemo 
to Mrs. Incredible to Buzz Lightyear met to toss out 
their ideas for the next movie. Freshman Tyler Carey 
appreciated the show, commenting, "I liked the Inception 
referencel" 

While the freshmen didn't take the win, the up- 
perclassmen were still impressed with their effort. Senior 
Brittany Gaffney affi rmed, "Freshmen stepped it up a lot 
this year." 

The Real World met Hannah Montana and Jack 
Sparrow when the junior class decided to see what 
would happen when a host of new generation Disney 
characters decided to live together. 

Despite all the creative juices that were flowing 
between the classes, one person stuck out from the 
rest. "The commercial with Dr. Bowling was the best," 
Caiflyn Crum laughed, "that is not something you would 
expect a university president to participate ml" 

- Sfao Bradbury 



1. Hannah Taylor plays Alice in Wonderland for the freshmen class, (bb) 2. Seth Means' 
shiny purple shirt steals the show, (bb) 3. Real guitar skills are not necessary for Steven 
Kruger to have a good time as one of the Jonas Brothers, (bb) 4. Seth Athialy and Keri 
Cannon are decked out as Aladdin and Jasmine, (bb) 5. Many students in the crowd opt 
to wear glow stick headbands to represent their class colors, (bb) 6. Ennn Proehl as 
Woody is interviewed by Taylin Frame, (bb) 7. Morgan Radzimanowski rocks out as a 
Cheetah Girl, (bb) 8. Jeff Maslan awaits his Lady, (bb) 




9. Abby Lalumendre plays one of the lost boys from "Peter Pan." (bb) 10. The seniors learn how to 'be men/ (bb) 11. Cole Jensen 
just keeps on digging, (bb) 12. Freshman Seth Lowery takes Winnie the Pooh to the extreme, (bb) 13. The seniors craft a 
strong finish and claim another Ollies Follies victory, (bb) 14. Michael Doherty, as Russell from "UP", ends the sophomores' dance 
with a hilarious reference to the movie "Inception." (bb) 15. David Parsons, dressed as Jack Sparrow, is ready for a sword fight. 
(bb) 16. The Incredibles. along with a host of other animated characters, come on stage for a dance routine, (bb) 



Student Life 



21 



j 



Broadway Revue 




This year's Broadway Revue brought out the dramatic and individualistic qualities in each of the 56 par- 
ticipants. With a range of selections from "Shrek" and "Jersey Boys" to classics such as "Joseph and the Tech- 
nicolor Dreamcoaf there was something for everyone. One of the senior directors, Brad Sytsma, says, "If was 
definitely a learning experience and a lot of fun." 

Talent was continuously exhibited as pieces flowed from humorous to more serious scenes. One of the 
more moving acts came from "Love Never Dies" starring Ben Moore as the Phantom and Gwen Holmes as Chris- 
tine from the Broadway hit "Phantom of the Opera." All the students showcased their talent through passionate 
portrayals of these Broadway hits by singing and dancing. 

- Kim Kratz and Kayla Koury 





1. Ben Moore pushes himself to hit a crowd- 
pleasing high note, (bb) 2. Taylin Frame evokes 
emotion from the crowd with her perfectly ex- 
ecuted song "A New Life."(bb) 3. GJ Frye lets his 
actions do the talking, (cl) 4. Matt Kee fries to 
"Follow his heart" as Emily Dillard serenades him. 
(bb) 5. Sefh Lowery invites the audience into 
his performance, (bb) 6. Andrew Nielson, Ben 
Geeding and ensemble sing of "Those Canaan 
Days."(ch) 




7. Andrew Nielson and crew attempt to remind Jake Boss that he is "Not alone" after all. (cl) 8. Merrick Robison brings 
The Music Man back to life with "You Got Trouble." (cl) 9. Ashley Raffauf and Wesley Taylor re-create the romance 
of Hairspray's "Without Love." (cl) 10. Tony Allen croons to the crowd, (bb) 11. All Carter portrays Shrek the Musical's 
Fiona from the scaffolding, (bb) 12. Andrew Nielson and Ben Geeding see a wondrous future, (cl) 

Student Lite 



omecoming Coronation 



1. Matt and Donna McAllister act as masters of ceremonies and interview Abby Pleasant, (cl) 2. 2010 Homecoming Oueen Annie 
Weaver is a Science Education major, (cl) 3. The ushers are given the critical role of helping the ladies of the Homecoming court walk 
without tripping on their dresses, (ch) 4. Wes Siscoe escorts Abby Bentle, who reveals that God has "stretched and molded her" while 
she's been at Olivet, (ch) 5. All joking aside, Annie Weaver says she would "like to be remembered as a role model and encourager for 
young women." (ch) 6. Jerry Scheller escorts Libby Devine, a biology major, (cl) 7. Evan Karg takes a break from his duties as student 
body President to escort the 2009-2010 Oueen, Sarah Clark, (ch) 8. Abby Pleasant and the other women on the court are featured in 
a slideshow before the ceremony, (ch) 



Representing- in the words of President 
Bowling- the "very best ideals of Olivet" Annie 
Weaver. Abigail Bentle, Libby Devine, Kafher- 
ine Krause and Abby Pleasant were honored 
by being selected by their peers to Olivet's 
2010 Homecoming court. 

"Our prayer is that you will see and hear 
these women's stories, and how they live for 
the glory of Christ," explained Masters of Cer- 
emony Mr. and Mrs. Matt McAllister. 

The ceremony included special musi- 
cal numbers, recorded messages from each 
woman's parents, and a question and answer 
time with each member of the court. 

After joking in her response that she'd like 
to be remembered as the 2010 Homecom- 
ing queen, senior Annie Weaver had her wish 
granted. "I feel really honored," she said. "As 
the ceremony fi nished I also felt very blessed 
to be surrounded by so many supportive 
people who I respect so much. I have been so 
blessed by my Olivet family." 

Weaver's advice for a freshman wonder- 
ing how to end up in her shoes one day is to 
"find balance, be involved, don't try and take 
on everything. Choose one or two things and 
really do them well. I'd also really challenge 
them to meet with the Lord in the "secret 
place" everyday, so that every other relation- 
ship and involvement flows out of that most 
important relationship with Him." 

-Staci Bradbury 








9. Sarah Clark passes on the mantle of queen to Annie Weaver, (cl) 10. Laura Fleschner sings the song "Beloved" with lyrics asking, "Lord, 
who am I compared to your glory and majesty?", (ch) 11. Kevin Greene and Annie Weaver "live for the glory of Christ," according to 
Donna McAllister, (cl) 12. The 2010 Homecoming Court consists of members of the senior class voted in by the student body, (cl) 13. 
Abby Bentle. who "made her faith her own" during the last four years, is escorted by W/es Siscoe. (cl) 14. "What we love most about Kate 
IKrausel is her presence, openness, and gift of sharing herself with others." Kate's mom says in a recording during the ceremony, (cl) 

Student Life 



25 





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1. Taylor Mason amuses the crowd with his Paco the Pig puppet, (bb) 2. 
Denita Phelps goes for an impressive lay-up to score for the ONU Tigers, 
(bb) 3. The Tigers go for a rush on the other team, (kb) 4. Toby the Ti- 
ger plays up the crowd with an encouraging banner, (bb) 5. Larnelle Harris 
moves the audience with a powerful message straight from the heart, (bb)' 
6. Olivetians Merrick Robison, Jenna Dickey, and Luke Olney use their talent 
to praise God. (bb) 7. Danielle Pipal, Holly Schachf, and Rachel Kearney gear 
up for another round on the court, (bb) 8. Players take a break as they ready 
up for the next play, (kb) 9. A member of Selah brings Dr. John C. Bowling 
on stage to sing to the crowd, (bb) 10. Marching Tigers strut their stuff on 
the fi eld during half time, (kb) 11. Orpheus sings at the top of their lungs with 
Larnelle Harris during the Homecoming concert, (bb) 



Homecoming 2010 was marked by the sounds of old friends being reunited in the Quad, 
siblings and families celebrating students success, and shouts of encouragement as the Ol- 
ivet Tigers took on the Cougars from St. Xavier University for the Homecoming game. 

Activities started on Wednesday, October 27th, with the coronation of Annie Weaver 
as the 56fh Homecoming Queen. The weekend events continued with the dedication of 
the Betty and Kenneth Hawkins Centennial Chapel on Friday. Saturday's schedule was full of 
exciting events ranging from the annual homecoming game to Powderpuff football, which 
the Senior ladies dominated. Saturday night parking was nonexistent as people crowded 
info Chalfanf for the anxiously awaited the concert featuring Larnelle Harris, Selah, and guest 
comedian Taylor Mason. Reunions were celebrated all over campus by various departments 
and all the choirs sang out their joy at being reunited by having a concert to commemorate 
their days here at ONU. 

Sophomore Gina Marti said, "I enjoyed this whole weekend from the football game to the 
concert, I will be definitely back here next yearl" 

-Kim Kratz 




, 




12. Multitudes of students, faculty, staff, and alumni gather to celebrate the opening service of the new Betty and Kenneth Hawkins 
Centennial Chapel, (bb) 13. Merrick Robison enlightens the crowd with his powerful voice, (bb) 14. Shirley Close receives the "0" 
Award from Dr. John C Bowling, (bb) 15. Brian Kosek plays a melodious tune on the cello, (bb) 



Student Life 



27 



" 



Candy Costume Fest 




Lights were dimmed low for a dramatic look 
as hundreds of students filled Chalfant Hall to cel- 
ebrate Olivet's Candy Costume Fest. Princesses 
and superheroes talked excitedly, while others 
compared costumes and tried to guess which of 
their friends were hidden behind masks. 

Tables decorated with bright orange pumpkins 
displayed old-fashioned caramel apples and ap- 
ple cider, and sugary aromas drew people to the 
sweet-and-salty cherry popcorn and powdery do- 
nut holes. 

Upbeat sounds of Olivet's Jazz Band fi lied the 
room and added to the lively atmosphere. 

Throughout the evening, students lined up on 
stage to participate in the costume contest hosted 
by Matt Smith. Perhaps the most memorable mo- 
ment of the night was when Freshman Reynauldt 
Keys bounded energetically on stage and enter- 
tained the crowd with his hilarious impersonation 
of Steve Urkel. Keys' costume was inspired by the 
show Family Matters. "Steve Urkel was a hilarious 
character who always made me laugh," he said. "The 
show was clean fun and also taught family values 
that you could live by. I've seen almost every epi- 
sode maybe twice, and I know most of his famous 
lines and gestures." Keys' ingenious performance 
earned him both the individual category prize and 
overall prize. 

Looking back on the night. Sophomore Amanda 
Miller noted, "It was an experience to see all the stu- 
dents dress up in their own unique costumes." 

-Hannah Pargulski 




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1. Alysson Parker waits patiently on stage, (bb) 2. These students proudly display their 
patriotism, (bb) 3. Emily Cheeseman gets into character with her creative costume, (bb) 
4. Jerry Scheller and Amy Farber look great in their costumes, (bb) 5. Matt Smith is host 
for the night, (bb) 6. The BP Oil Spill group wins over the audience, (ch) 7. The Wheel 
of Fortune group poses for a picture, (ch) 8. Jacob Hoskins forms part of the insurance 
group, (bb) 9. Hannah Short, Maya Scott, Shara Southerland, and Amy Swihart are enjoy- 
ing being on stage as the Nmja Turtles, (bb) 



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10. Reynauldt Keys accepts his award enthusiastically, (bb). 11. Shrek carries Fiona across stage, (ch). 12. Pacman: A classic costume idea, 
(bb). 13. David Parsons and Nicole Sloan are a gorgeous couple as Beauty and the Beast, (bb). 14. Sisters Danielle and Meghan Pipal dress 
as Tia and Tamara trom Sister Sister, (bb). 15. Ready for action! (bb). 16. Everyone enjoys some good music from Johnny Cash and June 
Carter-Cash. (bb). 17. Jacob and Ian Naldi dress up as Thing 1 and Thing 2. (ch). 18. Nick Klomstad is peeping Tom (bb). 

Student Life 



29 



All My Sons 



..-.■-.. ■ ■ - 

, ■ .-..■■ ■ 

n 




1. Hannah Williams tells Ann about how Chris always 
wants to look at the good in people, (bb) 2. Tony Al- 
len proposes a night out on the town, (bb) 3. Getting 
ready for rehearsal, Tony Allen shows he is confi dent in 
his performance, (bb) 4. Merrick Robison sits by Larry's 
broken tree conemplating his fate, (bb) 5. Jenny Ward's 
brother Brad Syfsma comes into town after seeing his 
father in jail to convince her not to marry Tony Allen, 
(bb) 6. Brad Syfsma has help with putting on make-up 
to prepare himself for his role as George Deever. (bb) 7. 
Jenny Ward discusses her life in New York, (bb) 



JULL ll'.j 

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11 

III 






Senior Tony Allen, who plays Chris Keller in the play, "All My Sons" 
summed up the message of the show: "It's a play where moments of 
truth devastate people". 

The play is based off an article in a 1947 Ohio newspaper about 
a man whose children turn him in to the police for producing faulty 
aircraft parts that caused planes to crash in WWII. The father, Joe 
Keller, played by Senior Merrick Robison, has secretly put the blame 
on Steve Deever in order to escape a jail sentence. The mother, Kate 
Keller, played by sophomore Emily Dillard, is very hopeful that her 
son, Larry, did not die in the war and will return again someday. Soon 
the plot is unraveled and truths arise that indeed cause heartbreak 
among this seemingly genuine American Suburb. 

The other couples in the play. Dr. Jim Bayliss and his wife Sue Bay- 
liss (played by freshmen Andrew Nielson and Hannah Williams) and 
Frank and Lydia Lubey (played by sophomores Tyler DeWees and 
Shelby Van Buren) add depth to the plot line and unveil the hidden 
reality of the main characters as the plot thickens. 

Overall the play was performed excellently and the cast was phe- 
nomenal. Sophomore Emily Dillard says, 'The cast was just great, we 
all got along really well and did an amazing job." 

-Allyson Vrabel 



8. Tony Allen and Jenny Ward are reunited for the fi rst time 
since Tony's brother, Larry, died, (bb) 9. Tyler DeWees reads 
the astrological signs, (bb) 10. Andrew Nielson browses the 
paper before Ann gets up in the morning, (bb) 11. Emily Dillard 
cannot admit that her son Larry is really dead and insists that 
he is still alive, (bb) 12. Merrick Robison uses make up to age 
himself to be able to play the father of Chris and Larry, (bb) 13. 
Tony Allen talks to his father, Joe, about his plans to marry Ann 
regardless of his mother's feelings about the situation, (bb) 




Student Life 



31 



Messiah 




Beautiful melodies drifted through the new Centennial Chapel as the department of music 
hosted its 75 th annual production of Handel's "Messiah." Outlining the events of the life of Jesus 
Christ, the celebrated Olivet orchestra added to the musical splendor of Chrysalis women's choir, 
Testament men's choir, and Orpheus choir. Dr. Neal Woodruff lead the orchestra while Dr. Jeff Bell 
conducted the choirs. 

Seen by many to be an important event in the Advent season, this year the concert fea- 
tured Olivet faculty on the harpsichord and the Ruffatti pipe organ, which was donated for the 
new chapel. The faculty shared the spotlight with students, who practiced for weeks on end to 
perfectly perform the song. Sophomore Jessica Harper, a member of the audience, gave her ap- 
proval for the over all show, as well as an individual who captured her attention with his splendid 
playing. "The show was amazing and David Rice la freshman bassist! did a phenomenal job." 

It was a successful event to begin celebrating the birth of Jesus Christ, as well as the 
opening of Centennial Chapel. 

-Kim Kratz 





1. Dr. Bell directs the choir, (bb) 2. Taylin Frame shows her 
musical talent, (bb) 3. The ladies make the violins sing, (bb) 4. 
Dr. Don Reddick conducts the orchestra with precision, (bb) 

5. Lauren Beatty and Amanda Luby play their harmony, (bb) 

6. Ali Carter sings her solo, (bb) 7. Dr. Neal Woodruff was one 
of the faculty members to perform a solo, (bb) 8. Sara Marrs 
plays a melody on the cello, (bb) 9. Ben Miller and Heidi Wat- 
son concentrate on their sheet music, (bb) 10. Dr. Bell leads 
the orchestra in perfect time, (bb) 11. Seth Lowery shows off 
his young talent, (bb). 12. The choir waits for their cue. (bb) 






13. Reuben Lillie stuns the crowd with his solo, (bb) 14. Dr. Bell continues with the orchestra during an accompaniment, 
(bb) 15. Jessica Brown concentrates on the notes, (bb) 16. Dr. Bowling takes center stage to welcome everyone to the 
concert, (bb) 17. Paul Drace amazes the audience with his vocals skills, (bb) 18. The Olivet orchestra makes sweet music, 
(bb) 19. Seth Lowery. and Reuben Lillie await their turn to sing, (bb) 20. Taylin Frame pauses for effect, (bb) 21. All Carter 
comes to the stage for another round of beautiful melody, (bb) 




Student Life 



33 



inter Banquet 







A night of illusion and splendor was waiting for students who pur- 
chased a ticket to Olivet's Winter Banquet, which was held on December 13, 
2010. Last year the event was sold out with 600 people in attendancethis 
year yielded similar results. 

Illusion and mystery were in the air as the night's entertainment fell 
underway. The atmosphere was one of delight, as the talented illusionist Da- 
vid Horsager held captive the audience's attention with skills of magic and 
wonder. 

Themed "Winter Illusions," Chalfanf was once again transformed from 
chapel style seating to a beautiful banquet hall filled with excited students. 
Chalfanf was decked out in black, red, and silver with shiny, wrapped Christ- 
mas boxes set as centerpieces in the middle of the fables and Christmas 
trees illuminated the corners of the room. 

Kelsea Beville enjoyed the night of fun and the chance to start cele- 
brating the Christmas season before fi nals began. "It was great time to get all 
dressed up, hang out with friends, and forget about school." People dressed 
in their finest attire and got lost in the night of magic. Through the laughter 
and awe of those in attendance, many memories were made. 



1. A charming group shows their pearly whites, 
(ch) 2. Illusfionist David Horsager entertains the 
crowd, (ch) 3. David Horsager calls Kyle Lowry 
up to the stage to assist him in a illusion, (ch) 4. 
Elizabeth McConnell lights up the stage, (ch) 5. 
Heidi Behal and Jake Farren make a picturesque 
couple, (ch) 



-Kim Krafz 







A M 




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6. Joe Blaney and Vanessa Pearson make 
a dashing pair, (ch) 7. Kyle Lowry and Da- 
vid Horsager delight the crowd with hu- 
mor and illusion, (ch) 8. Cassandra Daer and 
David Horsager reveal the number on the 
card, (ch) 9. Jordan Bergren and Sarah Di 
Monte smile for the camera, (ch) 10. Eliza- 
beth McConnell, David Horsager and Brad 
Gerwin make quite the magic trio, (ch) 11. 
A group shows of their splendid attire, 
(ch) 12. Shane Emaus and Jessica Palm look 
stunning in their evening wear, (ch) 13. Da- 
vid Horsager and Emily Borger bring the 
show to a close, (ch) 





Student Life 

35 






— 



Administrative Team 




The Administrative Team, or commonly Known 
as the "A-Team" is in charge ot determining and 
executing the long-term vision of Olivet Nazarene 
University, as well as its every day operation. 

The "A-Team" has the well being of Olivet's cam- 
pus grounds, faculty and staff, and most impor- 
tantly, the students, at heart. They make the most 
important decisions that determine the growth and 
overall success of the university. 

-Sarah Zelharf 



John C. Bowling, 

President of the University 

Gregg Chenoweth, 
Vice President for Academic Affairs 

Walter "Woody" Webb, 
Vice President for Student Development 

Doug Perry, 

Vice President for Finance 

Brian Allen, 

Vice President for Institutional Advancement 

Ryan Spittal, 
Vice President for Graduate and Continuing Studies 



Board of Trustees 







John C. Bowling, 


John Alexander 


Kevin Dunlop 


Mark Pennington 


Gene Snowden 


President of the University 


Stephen Anthony 


Steve Greene 


Mark Ouanstrom 


Jim Spruce 




Dave Anderson 


Fred Hall 


Alumni President 


Charles Sunberg 


Ted R. Lee, 


Richard Barriger 


Charles Hayes 


Jill Rice 


Cnsty VanSteenburg 


Chairman 


David Bartley 


Crawford M. Howe 


Myra Richardson 


H. David Walker 




Mark Bennett 


Douglas Jones 


Judi Roanck 


Brian Wilson 


David Roland, 


Ronald Blake 


Deri Keefer 


Philip Rogers 


Daniel Wine 


Vice Chairman 


Steven T. Bohall 


Lawrence Lacher 


Ron Scarlett 


Lee Woolery 




David Brantley 


Michael Lingle 


Karen Scott 




Mark L Hostetler, 


Wayne Brown 


Jack McCormick 


John Seaman 




Secretary 


Gary Cable 


Cyndi McDonald 


Cheryl Seymour 






David Caudle 


Stu Meissner, Jr. 


Cheryl Sherwood 






Arlene Chenoweth 


Garrett Mills 


John Sherwood 






Bill Clark 


Randy Owens 


William Shofts 






Lance Delbndge 


Garry Pate 


Mark Shuff 






Darcy Dill 


Keith Peachey 


Timothy Smith 





People 

39 



— 



Howie VanDyke 




Professor Howard Van Dyke is an 
adjunctfaculty member who teach- 
es in the Theology department at 
Olivet. Howard, or Howie, as many 
students Know him, began as a stu- 
dent at Olivet in 2004, obtaining his 
bachelor's degree in 2007 and his 
master's degree in 2009. Howard has 
been a prominent fi gure on the Ol- 
ivet landscape for several years now. 
Many students enjoy hearing his 
stories and Howard enjoys his time 
with his students very much as well. 
Howard says, "I love my students. 
I care about them- I'm here to help 
them with their lives." He fi rmly be- 
lieves that God "brings my students 
into my life for a reason. I'm here to 
help them, so that's what I do." 

Howard's road to his time here 
at Olivet has not been a conventional 
or easy path, but it has been a road 
that has allowed him many stories 
and growth experiences. He grew up 
in Peabody, Massachusetts, which is 
a suburb of Boston. He grew up with 
his parents and sister. Howard at- 
tended Salem State College and got 
half way through a degree in theatre 
before God radically got a hold of 
his heart, leading him to drop out of 
school. He had no idea who God was, 
but through random conversations, 
dreams, and lots of research and 
reading, Howard had an undeniable 
conviction that this Christian God 
was real and he could not get away 
from him any longer. Howard's fam- 
ily did not understand his decision to 
drop out of school: 



"My parents thought I was in- 
sane. They thought I was throwin' it 
all away." Howard says, "God came 
down from heaven and sat on my 
head. So I went to a church. I moved 
to Vermont. I worked in a delinquent 
boys home, which was hellish to say 
the least." 

Howard then came to Olivet in 
2004. Howard married his wife Re- 
becca in July of 2006 and says, "I 
have a wonderful wife and a wonder- 
ful marriage. My wife is awesome." 
They also live with Howard's African 
gray parrot named Phyllis. Howard 
says, "This bird is so smart you can 
have a conversation with it. I spend a 
lot of time with Phyllis." 

Besides spending time with his 
Rebecca and Phyllis, Howard writes 
articles and goes to College Church 
University Campus where he teaches 
a college Sunday school class. He also 
teaches a Bible study at the French 
Toast restaurant on Monday nights. 
Howard has felt the call to move 
on though, so after the 2010-2011 
school year he will be leaving Olivet 
to pursue his doctorate. He does not 
know exactly where he is going yet 
but assumes that he will end up on 
either U.S. coast, both of which have 
unique and alluring qualifies. Howard 
says, "I'm comfortable here but I'm 
ready to move on. I've reached a lot 
of people and made a lot of friends 
though." 



Howard's life and time at Olivet 
will have not been in vain as he defi - 
nitely left his mark on not only the 
Theology department by teaching 
Christian Scriptures and upper divi- 
sion Hebrew classes, but also by his 
time spent investing in the students. 

Howard sums it up by saying, 
"I love teaching and I am definitely 
gonna teach in the future. It's what 
God's called me to do and it's what 
I want to do. I see it as my calling in 
life to teach the people in the outside 
who grow up in Christianity, who 
have very good, honest questions. 
People act like I'm different 'cause I 
love my students. I just love them 
'cause I do-'cause God's taught me 
that's what I do. That's a by-product 
of leading a life that's pleasing to 
God. 'You let me do all the judging 
and you just loved.' Hopefully that's 
what God will say to me in the end. It 
will be good to leave Olivet, but it's 
the students I'll miss most." 

With certainty, both Olivet and 
the students will miss Howard Van 
Dyke as well. 



Kayla Koury 



People 

41 



Faculty and Staff 



JEREMY ALDERSON 

ROBERT ALLEN 

WHITNEY ALLISON 

HAMPTON ANDERSON 

MARY ANDERSON 

RENA ANDERSON 

PAUL ARMSTRONG 

BRADLEY ARTHUR 

ANN ATKINSON 

■ DAVID ATKINSON 

KAREN BALL 

JONATHAN BARTLING 

DAVID BECKER 

SANDRA BEGLEY 

REBECCA BELCHER-RANKIN 

JEFFERY BELL 

ANNA BENOIT 

NANCY BENOIT 

MICHAEL BENSON 

NICHOLAS BIRKEY 

CRAIG BISHOP 

LEON BLANCHETTE 

JORGE BONILLA 

NANCY BONILLA 

RAY BOWER 
MATTHEW BOWMAN 
DARCEL BRADY 
KEVIN BREWER 
JUSTIN BROWN 
KELLY BROWN 

STEPHEN BROWN 

TINA BRUNER 

LINCOLN BUTLER 

KARLA BYRNE 

WILFREDO CANALES 

CHARLES CARRIGAN 

MARY CARY 

JOHN CHANG 

GREGG CHENOWETH 

TERESA CHOATE 

JASMINE CIESZYNSKI 

DAVID CLABORN 





SPENCER COOK 
JEANNE COSTA 
BARBARA DAAKE 
DONALD DAAKE 
HEATHER DAY 
CARRIE DILLEY 

MARY DILUNGER 
PAUL DILUNGER 
NANCY DODD 
JEFFREY DOMAGALSKI 
OLIVIA DORRIES 
BRANDON DOTY 

USA DRURY 

AMY DUERRWAECHTER 
MATTHEW DWYER 
ELAINE ELDERS 
NICOLE ENZINGER 
ELIZABETH ESCHKER 

LARRY FERREN 
DAN FERRIS 
DEREK FERRIS 
LAURA FIELDS 
LEO FINKENBINDER 
MATTHEW FOOR 

ROXANNE FORGRAVE 
JULIENE FORRESTAL 
MARK FRISIUS 
TORI GAUMER 
CHELSIE GEASA 
PATRICIA GEASA 

ANDREW GIBBS 
HEATHER GIBBS 
ROBERT GIBSON 
DWIGHT GINN 
DAVID GOVE 
MARK GOLDFAIN 

DALE GOODMAN 
RALPH GOODWIN 
PAMELA GREENLEE 
TIFFANY GREER 
KATHLEEN GREMAR 
JOY GUFFEY 



Faculty & Staff 

43 



Faculty and Staff 



LORNA GUIMOND 

RACHEL GUIMOND 

MORGAN HALEY 

WILLA HARPER 

MARY HASKINS 

DALE HATHAWAY 

DOUGLAS HEW/ETT 

DAWN HINRICHS 

CRAIGHTON HIPPENHAMMER 

SANDRA HORTON 

SETH HURD 

KRISTY INGRAM 

CALLIE IVEY 

ROSETTA JEWELL 

DAVID JOHNSON 

DONNIE JOHNSON 

DANIEL JOULSON 

REBECCA KELSEY 

PATRICIA KERSHAW 

BRENDA KIRBY 

THOMAS KNOWLES 

KAREN KNUDSON 

PAUL KOCH 

SUZANNE KRING 

CAROL LANG 

BARRY LEE 

PAMELA LEE 

ALLYSSA LEWIS 

KRISTEN LEWIS 

MEDA LONG 

JENNIFER LOVE 

TROY LOVELL 

KEVIN LOWERY 

CATHERINE LUNDMARK 

JOSHUA LUNDMARK 

JOSEPH MAKAREWICZ 




1 




JEAN MARTIN 
STAN MARTIN 
JAY MARTINSON 
STACEY MAY 
PATRICK MCCONNELL 
JANNA MCLEAN 

NEAL MCMULLIAN 
PAMALI MEADOWS 
ANNETTE MEENTS 
TIMOTHY MERCER 
NATHAN MERKI 
DWAYNE MILLS 

JEAN MILTON 
FRANKLIN MOORE 
MATTHEW MOORE 
SUSAN MOORE 
MARK MOUNTAIN 
KASHAMA MULAMBA 

CONNIE MURPHY 
LARRY MURPHY 
HOLLY NELSON 
TIMOTHY NELSON 
IVOR NEWSHAM 
LYNN NIXON 

LAURALEE NOTHSTINE 
JOHN NUTTER 
AMY NUXOLL 
AMBER OLNEY 
KENT OLNEY 
KYLE OLNEY 

DALE OSWALT 
STEPHANIE PENEV 
FRANCES PENROD 
MONIOUE PERRY 
DAVID PICKERING 
AGNES POSTHUMUS 



— - 



Faculty & Staff 

45 



Faculty and Staff 



MARIAH POTTS 

MICHAEL PYLE 

NANCY PYLE 

MARK OUANSTROM 

ROY OUANSTROM 

DEBBIE RATTIN 

CAROL REAMS 

MAX REAMS 

DONALD REDDICK 

MARY REED 

NATHANIEL REISS 

JEFFREY RICE 

DIANE RICHARDSON 

DORIS ROBERTS 

YVETTE ROSE 

GINA RUPERT 

KARI SANDOUKA 

JOSEPH SCHROEDER 

KURT SCHWOB 

ZOE SEED 

KIMBERLY SHEETS 

MEGAN SHERMAN 

PRISCLLA SKALAC 

MEGAN SKINNER 

MATTHEW SLIMMER 

DALE SMITH 

MARSHA SMITH 

MATTHEW SMITH 

ROBERT SMITH 

SCOTT SMITH 

RYAN SPITTAL 

SARA SPRUCE 

DEBORAH STAFFORD 

MEGAN STERK 

JUDSON STRAIN 

GHEDAM SULTAN 





THALYTA SWANEPOEL 
DARLENE SWANSON 
BRADLEY THOMAS 
AARON THOMPSON 
HOUSTON THOMPSON 
MARTHA THOMPSON 

RICHARD TRAN 
MARY TR1MBY 
HENRY TUTTLE 
ROSALIE TUTTLE 
JAMES UPCHURCH 
AMANDA UPSHAW 

LARRY VAIL 
DAVID VANCE 
DAVID VANHEEMST 
BETH VEIT 
KRISTIAN VEIT 
SUSAN VICKERS 

MARJORIE VINSON 
CAROL WATSON 
WALTER WEBB 
KELLY WELLENREITER 
CORRIE WESSMAN 
PAUL WHITE 

REBECCA WILLIAMS 
SUE WILLIAMS 
JEFFREY WILLIAMSON 
ELICA WILSON 
DAVID WINE 
RAYMOND WISSBROECKER 

FREDA WOLFE 
NEAL WOODRUFF 
KAREN WRIGHT 
BEATRIZ YDROVO 
OVID YOUNG 



Faculty & Staff 

47 




- 



VQj 



Nick Wangler, a senior, tells the Aurora yearbook: 
"I hope I am driving in the right direction." This state- 
ment sums up the feelings and hopes of many other 
Olivet students especially, seniors. For Nick these 
hopes are definitely being fulfilled as he finishes 
his undergraduate degree, celebrates nine months 
of marriage with his new wife, Katie, starts his own 
business, and serves as an MS4 cadet in the Olivet 
Roaring Battalion Tigers ROTC program. Nick has his 
hands full, but he is driven to succeed and to do well 
in all these ventures. 

When discussing his schooling at Olivet Nick says, 
"I always knew about Olivet and was contemplat- 
ing doing ROTC so Olivet just seemed like a good 
fi t." Nick came from a Nazarene pastor's family. Nick's 
parents, younger brother Nathan, and younger sister 
Natalie live in Ottawa, Illinois, which he says is "just 
like Canada except it's a cornfield." 

When Nick came to Olivet his freshman year of 
college he decided to major in cooperate communi- 
cations. Although he admits he doesn't actually want 
to do anything in his major, he wants to use it as a 
base to learn how to do public relations work in his 
current field. Nick met Katie Gunderson his freshman 
year when they took two general education Chris- 
tian courses together. Katie was Baptist and Nick was 
Nazarene so he says, "I made fun of her about that. 
We ended up talking after class and now we have 
been together for four years." The two got married 
on July 17, 2010. They now live in Bourbonnais while 
they finish up their degrees here at Olivet. 



Nick joined the ROTC program his freshman year 
and he has now joined the National Guard. As for Army 
commitments in the future, Nick says, "You never 
know, I want to do what I'm passionate about more 
than anything. But I hear the Army pays well." Nick's 
passions mainly lie with his newest venture- running 
his own company named New Ink Designs. This com- 
pany is run out of Nick's apartment for now, and he 
does graphics, marketing, and promotional work for 
different businesses. Nick explains that, "Pixels are the 
new communication lesion." 

Nick has a lot on his plate balancing all these differ- 
ent aspects of his life, and he admits that sometimes 
he feels torn between all the different pursuits. Nick 
says, "What's hard is nailing down what drives me. I'm 
very passionate person just in general. One mam mo- 
tivation is just communicating the gospel. Ultimately, 
I don't want to be just another business with no real 
value eternally. It's about serving God and communi- 
cating the gospel through my interactions. I want to 
glorify God in everything that I'm doing." 



Kayla Koury 



People 

49 



Seniors 




1. Erin Salzman and John Ouandt watch the Ollies Follies video at the Tobies senior event, (cb) 2. Matt Kee shows his senior spirit, (cl) 3. Wes 
Siscoe gives his all in the Ollies Follies stage show, (bb) 4. David Anderson and Mike Tuttle look spiffy at the Tobies, (cb) 5. This good looking 
group of seniors enjoys the Winter Illusions banquet, (ch) 6. Paul Conzen sets his aim on the competition, (mr) 7. Adam Hines and Mike Tuttle 
make a dashing Larry and Bob. (bb) 8. These seniors in blue do their part for the Ollies Follies senior winl (bb) 






Paul Addington David Allen Samantha Allen Heather Ames David Anderson Jaymie Anderson Krisfen Anderson 

Intercultural Studies Mass Communication Art Elementary Education Physical Education Elementary Education Nursing 




Zachary Armstrong Amanda Ashley All Baig 

Economics-Finance Elementary Education Dietetics 



lLllUHil. t°A Vi . I i 

Andrew Baker 

Social Work 



Bethany Baldwin 
Accounting 



Amber Balster 
Information Systems 



Alice Banashak 

Family/Consumer Science 
Education 




Bradlee Barnes 

Art 



Jacob Barse 
Elementary Education 



Jason Batkiewicz Shannon Battershell 
Business Administration Social Work 



Paul 

Biology 



Amy Bell Christy Bell 

Business Administration Elementary Education 




Lisa Beyer 
Exercise Science 



Daniel Biddison 
Criminal Justice 



Amanda Birth 
Elementary Education 



David Bisaillon 
History 



Erin Blucker 
Psychology 



Zachary Boie 

Engineering 



Elizabeth Bonilla 
Nursing 



Seniors 

51 



Seniors 



' 




Andrea Borton 
Social Work 



Jacob Boss 
International Business 



Jeremiah Bower 
Economics-Finance 



Dwight Brenner 
Marketing 



Molly Brewer 
History 



Chelsey Brown 
Nursing 



Jessica Brown 
English 




Wade Bruce Alyson Bundy Isaac Burch Ashley Burgoyne Kayla Button Sara Byrne Blake Campbell j 

Computer Science Youth Ministry Music Accounting Social Work Elementary Education History & Philosophy- 

Religion 




Rachel Campbell 
Pastoral Ministry 



Tyler Campbell 
Pastoral Ministry 



Esteban Canales Ken Cannon 

c . . „ . Housing/Environmental 

Sport Management ° 

Design 



Megan Carlton 
Accounting 



Brett Carmouche 
Political Science 



Casandra Carr 
Intercultural Studies 




Clinton Casey 

International Business 



Elizabeth Caudle 
Art 



Aivon Cervantes 
Nursing 



Caitlin Charles 
Housing/Environmental 

Design 



Lauren Charles 
English 



Kristin Cheney Alyssa Chenowetl 
Exercise Science Biology 





Andrew Clark 


Lindsay Close 


Michael Cobb 


Simone Coburn 


Jessica Cohea 


Anthony Collier 


Jessie Colon 


Actuarial Science 


Elementary Education 


Exercise Science 


Sociology 


Journalism 


Criminal Justice 


Business Administratic 



Michael Combes 
Sociology 



Kendra Compton 
Sociology 



Matthew Compton 
Political Science 



Paul Conzen 

Art 



Ben j amen Coots 
Marketing 



Bethany Copley 
Social Work 



Aaron Cordle 
Mass Communication 




Alaina Corfits Raphael Correa Evelyn Cota Vargas Alyssa Cramer 

Art Business Administration Dietetics Art 



Jordan Cramer 
Computer Science 



Joshua Crowley 
Economics-Finance 



Philip Culver 
Physical Education 




Ryan Dahl 
Biology 



Traci Damptz 

Business Administration 



Melanie Daniels 
Elementary Education 



Randall Darden 
Criminal Justice 



Keilyn Davenport 

Economics-Finance 



Jaclyn Davisson 
Intercultural Studies 



Brenda Dearth 
Nursins 




Joshua Deboer Mary DeGroot Emily Del Soldato 

Engineering Accounting & Economics- Sociology 

Finance 



Matthew Dennis 
Social Work 



Elizabeth Devine 
Biology 



Shannon Dexter Ryan DeYoung 

Zoology Engineering 




H v MWM 

Elizabeth Dikeman Juliana DiRienzo 



Nursins 



Elementary Education 



Caitlin Dodge 
Elementary Education 



Laura Dorsey 

Elementary Education 



Katlyn Downs 
Social Work 



Paul Drace 

Music Education & 

Vocal Performance 



Nora Duffy 
Elementary Education 



Seniors 

53 



Seniors 




Noelle Dumey 
Nursing 



Cameron Dunlop 
Pastoral Ministry 



Kelly Dunwoody Stephanie Dusing Kathryn Eccles Tabitha Eckert James Eckstein I 

Accounting Social Work Geology Nursing Business Administratiol 





Jordan Eggleston 
Athletic Training 



Preston Eilders 
Biology 



Jordan Ekhoff 

Chemistry 



Kail-Iain Ekhoff 

Nursing 



Melissa Eller 
Nursing 




:kk 

Lauren Erdahl 




Erica Engelbrecht 

Biology & Exercise Science Elementary Education 



Alejandro Escobar Natasha Evins 



Youth Ministry 



Elementary Education 



Amy Farber 
International Business 




Benjamin Fifield 
Information Systems 



John Fischer 
Economics-Finance 



Katelyn Flynn 

English 



Lauren Fogwell 
Housing/Environmental 



Elise Foley 
English 




Elizabeth Foster 

Engineering 



Roy Franklin 
Social Work 




Nathaniel Frantz 
Engineering 



Summer Fuentes 
Spanish 



Courtney Fuqua 
Biblical Studies 



Brittany Gaffney Urbano Garcia Jordan Gersfenberger Alyssa Gibson 

Accounting Intercultural Studies Psychology Journalism 



Danielle Gibson 

Accounting & Business 

Administration 



Bryan Giesige Bnttnee Gilleylen Kelsee Gilleylen David Ginn 

Psychology Elementary Education Elementary Education Information Systems 



Kenton Glover Jill Goerne 

Athletic Training Early Childhood Education 




Aaron Golden 


Julieanne Gonzales 


Emily Gorman 


Jordan Grambush 


Mark Green 


Kevin Greene 


Cole Gnswold 


Philosophy-Religion 


Elementary Education 


Social Work 


Biology 


Business Administration 


Biology 


Philosophy-Religion 




ebastian Grochowski Matthew Groves 
History Mass Communication 



Jorge Guzman 


Jasen Hackman 


Cory Hainlen 


Erica Hall 


Timothy Hall 


Public Policy 


Business Administration 
& Music 


Accounting 


Exercise Science 


Chemistry 




Philip Hamilton 
Engineering 



Lauren Hamlet Trevor Hamm 

Mass Communication Biology 



Amanda Hanson 
Athletic Training 



Adrienne Harris 

Art 



Faith Hatalla Joy Hathaway 

Elementary Education Fashion Merchandising 




Ryan Hayes 
Political Science 



Lance Hays 
Psychology 



— 



Jessica Heisey 

Nursing 



Laci Hernandez Melmda Hess Adam Hmes Kyle Hodson 

Marketing Zoology Communication Studies Business Administration 



■ " ■ " ■ ; " 



Seniors 

55 

1 ■ ■■' ' 



Seniors 




Rachel Holmgren 
Elementary Education 



Alison Hoskins 

Social Work 



Jadon Huddleston 
English 



Amber Hughes 
Art 



Annastacia Hughes 
English Education 



Maria Huyser Young Im 

Communication Studies Psychology & Sociolog 




Michelle Imig 
Youth Ministry 



Lisa Jackson 
Fashion Merchandising 



Paul Jackson 
Engineering 



William Jackson 
Elementary Education 



Brooke Jamerson 
Nursing 



Lindsey Jarrett 
Elementary Education 



Timothy Jefferies 
Social Work 




Heather Johnson 
Science Education 




Matthew Johnson Stephanie Johnson Stephanie Jungles John Michael Jurica Zipporah Kapambwe Emily Karas 
Accounting Fashion Merchandising International Business Elementary Education Marketing & Fashion Elementary Education! 

Merchandising 




Evan Karg 
English 



Mitchell Kaufmann 
Accounting 



Matthew Kee 

International Business < 
Spanish 



Knsten Kehl 
Elementary Education 




Hannah Keys 
Nursing 



Rebekah Kidd 
Christian Education 



/ 

Amanda Kindle 
Pastoral Ministry 




Darcy King 
Exercise Science 



Kirstie King 
Computer Engineering 



Nicole King 
Political Science 



Jeannette Kirchner 
English 




Laura Kirst 


Jenna Kirts 


Nicole Klein 


Ashley Klossing 


Corrine Koepsell 


Bethany Kolber 


Laura Konopack 


Math Education 


Nursing 


Communication Studies 


Marketing 


Psychology & Sociology 


Nursing 


Nursing 




Jessica Kortas 
Biology 



Brian Kosek 

Psychology 



Kayla Koury 

English 



Katherine Krause Nathan Krause Nicole Krawec Samantha Krestel 

Biology Chemistry English Education English 




Douglas Krop 
Physical Education 



Kaley Krull 
Elementary Education 



Katherine Kulchar 
Psychology 



Tricia Kundrat 

Social Work 



Au'Drea Lacey 
Music & Psychology 



Felicia Lamb 
Elementary Education 



Nikki Lamb 
Political Science 




Angela Lee 
English Education 



Jennifer Legg 

Business Administration 



Rebecca Leibold 
Housing/Environmental 



Carlie Lengench 
Nursing 



Emily Lewis 
Nursing 



Reuben Lillie 

Music Education & 

Vocal Performance 



Mark Lockwood 
Mathematics-Actuarial 

Science 




AmyLoeffler Marjone Lonberger Cynthia Lopez Jeremy Lord Neil Love Rebecca Lowery 

| Fashion Merchandising Elementary Education Nursing General Studies Criminal Justice Social Work 



Anne Lowry 
Elementary Education 



Seniors 

57 



Seniors 




Calla Lowry 
Marketing 



Alisha Lundmark 
Exercise Science 



Michael Lyon 

Art 



Sarah Manchester Katelyn Mansfield 



Nursms 



English 



Grace Manfarian 
Children's Ministry 



Sara Marrs 
Psychology 




Hilary McDaniel Kathenne McDonald Emily McDowell Katelin McElroy Cody McGraw 

Elementary Education Marketing Elementary Education Social Science Education Mass Communication 



Julie McGreevy Kelsey McLaughlin 
Elementary Education Psychology 




Lucas Mellinger Laura Messenger Sarah Mefzger Brandi Meyers 

Accounting Social Science Education Elementary Education Housing/Environmental 

Design 



Stella Meyers 

Exercise Science 



Andrew Miller 
Exercise Science 



Cory Miller 
Athletic Traininc 




Nicole Miller 
Music 



Zarah Miller 
Mass Communication 



Nicholas Minnich 
Sport Management 



Matthew Mitchell 
Business Administration 



Rebecca Moisio Rachel Monkemeyer 
Mass Communication Exercise Science 




Jelissa Morales Ashley Morgan Hugo Moriya Leeanna Neeley Kathryn Nelson Kevin Nichols 

Nursing Nursing Business Administration Nursing Elementary Education Zoology 



Anna Niebuhr 
Elementary Education 




Charles Oehmke Meagan Olds Steve Olson Alex Onyett Cherise Ostrowski Kelsey Outler Jacquelyn Owens 

Exercise Science Nursing Physical Education Mass Communication Elementary Education Children's Ministry Business Administration 




Lindsey Pals 
Elementary Education 



Sarah Pare 
Pyschology 



Kyle Peachey 
Religious Studies 



Elisabeth Peulausk 
English 



Farris Pierson 
Physical Education 



Ashley Piggush 

Nursine 



Abby Pleasant 
Exercise Science 




Michael Polley Jeffrey Poucher Travis Powers Amy Preston 

Criminal Justice Exercise Science Economics-Finance Spanish 



Martin Pritchett 
Engineering 



John Ouandf 
Engineering 



Sarah Ouinlin 

Elementary Education 




John Rachan 
Engineering 



Brennan Ragon 
Sport Management 



Joel Ramirez Remington Ramsey Billy Ratthahao 
Music Exercise Science Business Administration 



m 

Blake Reddick 
Music 



Bradley Reed 
Communication Studies 



Seniors 

59 



Seniors 




Angela Reedy Jennifer Reierson Jacqueline Reinhardt Matthew Reynolds Rachel Rhule 

Music Education Nursing Social Work Art Education Art 



Charles Rideout Kirsten Roberts 

Accounting Nursing 




Brianna Robins 
Music Education 


Meagan Robins 
Social Science & 
Political Science 


Cara Robinson 
Elementary Education 


Kayla Robinson 
Art 


Merrick Robison 
Music 



Kristina Rubin Jessica Ruddle 

English Mass Communication 




Randall Rupert 

Art 



Chrissy Rust 
Social Work 



Erin Salzman 
Exercise Science 



Jamie Sandefur 
Marketing 



Olivia Santiago 
Marketing 



\\\\ lis 

Jerry Scheller 

Art 



Jessica Schewe 

English 




Adam Schick Angela Schiefelbein Michael Schimp 
Business Administration Nursing Elementary Education 



Daniel Schindel 
General Studies 



Anne Schmelzer 
Social Work 



Tara Schmidt 

Communication Studies 



Andrew Schmitz 
Philosophy-Religion 




Brittany Schuyler 
Social Work 



Rachel Scott 
Nursing 



Brittany Scruggs 
Elementary Education 



Brenna Settle 



Leah Shankster 
Biology 



Emily Shelton 
Psychology 



Sarah Shilvock 
Political Science 






Justin Shonamon 
Physical Education 



acey Skelton 
Social Work 



Stephanie Siadak Daniel Sidler Anthony Sims 

Elementary Education Information Systems Intercultural Studies 



mm 

Lauren Sinwelski 

Social Work 



Emily Sipe 

Biology 



Wes Siscoe 
Philosophy-Religion 




Engineering 



Kendra Smith 
Social Work 



Travis Smith 
Graphic Design 



Kristine Sokarda Christopher Sorensen Amanda Soukup 
Communication Studies Computer Science m 8SS Communication 




Alek Stevens Tania Stott Rachael Streff 

Pastoral Ministry Mass Communication Nursing 



Ashlee Strickler 
Marketing 




Jeffrey Stark 
Science Education 



Rebeckah Sterns 
Music 



Adam Steveley 
History & Political Science 




Andrew Strombeck 

Youth Ministry 



Cara Sunberg 

History 



Kristi Sweeney 

Biology 




Bradley Sytsma Brooklyn Taylor Christyn Tharp 



ness Administration 



Nursme 



Intercultural Studies 



Dallas Tharp 
Youth Ministry 



rittany Thomas 
Social Work 



Kaitlynn Thome Victoria Tillman 

Nursing Business Administration 



Seniors 

61 






Seniors 




Danek Torrey 

International Business . 

Marketing 



Nina Trisilla 

Nursing 



Alexis Troglio 
Elementary Education 



Muluneh Tulu 
Nursing 



Michael Tuttle 
Accounting & 

Economics-Finance 



Amanda Vanderpool Katy Van Donselaal 
Social Work & Spanish Biology 




Keith Venhuizen Lauren Versweyveld Craig Vickey 



Business Administration 



Dietetics 



Criminal Justice 



Claudia Voicu 

Journalism 



Jayna Vroman Rachel Waage Caroline Wainwrighi 

Geology Housing/Environmental children's Ministry 

Design 




Kasey Waite 
Psychology 



Kyle Walker 
Political Science 



Mathew Wallace 
Computer Science 



Kevin Walsh 
Engineering 



Kathryn Wangler Nicholas Wangler 
Psychology Communication Studies 



Ember Ward 

Housing/Environmental 

Design 




Paige Watson Laura Wayteck 

Corporate Communication Art Education 



Anna Weaver Nathan Weeden Lauren Wegley 



Science Education Business Administration 



Abigail Weisel 
Nursing 



Aaron Westerfield 
Social Work 



Studies 




Bryan Whalen Angela Williams Devin Williams 

Physical Education Business Administration Exercise Science 



Jon Williams Bethani Wilson Catherine Wilson Christen Wilson 

Exercise Science Elementary Education Mass Communication Elementary Education! 



Steven Windberg 
Chemistry & Biology 



Chelsea Winn 

Nursing 



Kelsey Wiseman 
Finance, Marketing & 

Administration 



Julie Wittmer 
Nursing 



Joseph Wood 

Youth Ministry 



Emily Wynstra 
English 



Brittiny York 
Spanish 



Ashley Young Meredith Youn^ 

Family & Consumer Psychology 

Science 



Brittany Woods 

Nursing 



Samantha Young Nicole Zizic 

English Business Administration 



3 I%1 

Anson Workman 
Mass Communication 




Seniors 

63 



"he Tobie 




1. Nicole King takes home the "Bubbly and Bright' award, (cb) 2. Erica Engelbrecht and Tayler St. Aubin sparkle in black and 
white, (cb) 3. Adam Steveley gets the joke, (cb) 4. Senior class President Shannon Battershell welcomes the guests, (cb) 
5. Clinton Casey and Ali Baig let the laughter roar, (cb) 6. The guests enjoy a night of fun and friends, (cb) 




At the first ever (and only) senior To- 
bies event, over one hundred seniors fi lied 
the Warming House dressed in their black 
and white best, ready to enjoy a night of 
awards, chocolate fountains and spending 
time together as a class. The night started 
off with the "Should Have Seen If Coming" 
award going to Jerry Scheller and Amy 
Farber. Another memorable award included 
Jacob Barse's recognition as "Orange Ver- 
sus Window" reminiscent of his freshman 
year shenanigans. Katie McDonald's stead- 
fast devotion to Olivet was recognized in 
the "Olivefian for Life" award while Jacque- 
lyn Owens was voted the "Next American 
Idol." 

The night was full of food, laughter, 
and reminiscing over the Top 10 Reasons 
You Know You're a Senior' and celebrating 
the most recent Ollies Follies win. As host 
Howie Van Dyke said, "It's good to be here 
together." 

-Kayla Koury 




7. Hannah Im and Rachel Monkemeyer sample the food, (cb) 8. Matt Kee. Clin- 
ton Casey, All Baig and Andrew Clark set the bar high, (cb) 9. Four beauti- 
ful roommates enjoy the Ollies Follies video, (cb) 10. Brian Kosek receives 
"Best Student Postcard Award." (cb) 11. Howie Van Dyke revels in Matt Kee's 
personal rendition of "How to Find a Wife." (cb) 12. The senior class council 
represents the class well, (cb) 

Seniors 



65 



Junior Kayla Rolling is driven by 
many things; she feels passionate 
about traveling, helping women, 
food, and most of all, her relation- 
ship with Jesus Christ. 

Olivet was not on the top of 
Kayla's list of possible schools 
to attend. She is from Green Bay, 
Wisconsin and had never really 
been exposed to the Nazarene 
church. She had planned to go to 
Biola University in California, but as 
soon as she stepped onto Olivet's 
campus she felt God's clear direc- 
tion for her to attend school here. 
Kayla Knew she wanted to attend 
a Christian school and Knows now 
that Olivet was the right choice for 
her: "Each year being here I have 
more assurance and clarity that I 
am supposed to be here. It is the 
coolest thing to see the students 
interact on this campus." 

Kayla grew up in Chicago and 
didn't move to Green Bay until 
she was about 12 years old. Af- 
ter high school Kayla decided to 
taKe a year off and bought a one- 
way ticket to Herborn, Germany, a 
small village outside of Frankfurt. 
She lived there a little more than 
a semester, but then had to come 
back because she couldn't get a 
job. When she first left she didn't 
know when she would be coming 
back to the United States, and she 
treasured every moment of her 
time in Germany. She lived with 
a family of bom-again Christians 
who were just establishing 



a church. Kayla says she "helped 
with building and planning and the 
church body. I was there three or 
four times a week and I cooked for 
the whole church every Sunday. It 
was an awesome experi ence to 
know. 

God had set me up with this 
Christian family there." When Kayla 
came back to United States she 
took some classes at a commu- 
nity college and saved up money 
while both processing her time 
abroad and preparing for her col- 
lege years ahead. 

Once Kayla started at Olivet she 
threw herself into school, building 
relationships and becoming a part 
of the Olivet community. Kayla is a 
dietetics major with a double mi- 
nor in chemistry and English, and 
as if her work didn't keep her busy 
enough, this year Kayla was elect- 
ed to the position of Vice Presi- 
dent of Women's Residential Life. 
She had served as class president 
her sophomore year, but after 
much encouragement, prayer, and 
consideration Kayla decided that 
WRL was the better fi t for her. She 
said she has a strong "passion and 
desire to help women" and became 
really excited about the position 
when God began showing her how 
she could speak into the lives of 
the women on campus. Since she 
started serving as WRL president 
Kayla has made some significant 



changes to the Sister-2-Sisfer 
program, as well as making chang- 
es to Homecoming Coronation and 
Mr. ONU, and she now has some 
great ideas for new events and 
themes in the semester to come. 
She has loved getting to know her 
council and watching them really 
fake responsibility and share in her 
same passion and fi re for women. 

Kayla's relationship with God 
began when she started high 
school.Through various relation- 
ships, events, and an inward de- 
sire driving her, she found God 
and fell in love with Him. She feels 
his calling on her to be a mid- 
wife someday and be able to be 
an instrument in blessing women. 
When asked what drives her Kayla 
responded by saying, "I feel like I 
am most alive when I am helping 
another woman, but the Holy Sprit 
and the Lord are ultimately what 
drive me in every area of my life." 



Kayla Koury 



People 

67 



umors 




Jorden Bergren works the Block Party for ASC. (bb) 2. Chris Cornish enjoys some Block Party fun. (mr) 3. Cole Jensen practices his mad 
dance moves for the Ollies Follies Variety Show, (ch) 4. Sarah Zelhart and Diane Rankin cheer on their fellow classmates at the Ollies Fol- 
lies Wacky Games, (ch) 5. Friends enjoy the block party, (mr) 6. Junior class President Mitch Johnson shows off his muscles, (mr) 7. Shara 
Soufherland during the Junior's Ollies Follies routine, (bb) 8. Liz Golle, Alex Lord and Alisa Morris perfect their routine for the Variety Show. 
(ch) 9. Jack Chrisfensen, Austin Hill and Chad Hemphill reunite at the Block Party, (mr) 




BETHANY ABBOTT 
LUIS AGUILAR 
MICHAEL ALEXANDER 
JENNIFER ANDERSON 
MOLLY ANDERSON 
SETH ATHIALY 



CHRISTIAN BACH 
ZACHARY BAKER 
DOUGLAS BANKER 
MICHAEL BARKLEY 
ELISABETH BARNES 
NATALIE BEGICK 



HEIDI BEHAL 
LAURA BENDA 
MICAH BENNETT 
JORDAN BERGREN 
EBONI BERRY 
MICHAEL BISHOP 



LAUREN BLUNIER 
KATHRYN BOOKER 
GRACE BOWMAN 
BRENT BROOKS 
SARAH BRUMMERSTEDT 
JAIME BUCKMAN 



Juniors 



69 




JESSICA BURNESON 

ASHLEY BURT 

ANDREW BUTLER 

TERESE BYRNE 

JACOB BYROM 

LEIZEL CAMPOLLO 



CALEB CARMAN 

ALICIA CARTER 

EMILY CHAMNESS 

JOHN CHRISTENSEN 

LAUREN CIGANEK 

DANA CLAUSING 



LAUREN COMFORT 

ELIZABETH COOK 

JORDAN COOK 

LYNDSAY COOMBS 

CHRISTIAN CORNISH 

DALE CRAWLEY 



CAITLYN CRUM 

APRIL CULVER 

JOSHUA DAMPF 

CHELSEA DEATON 

AUBREY DEE 

JESSE DILLMAN 





SARAH DIMONTE 
ETHAN DIXON 
TYSON DODD 
RAEMARIE DONALDSON 
ABIGAIL DORAN 
KATLYN DOWNS 



SARAH DURAZO 
ANGELA EDWARDS 
STEPHANIE EIS 
KATELYN EMERSON 
REBEKAH ENGBERS 
SALLY ERICKSON 



SARA ERICKSON 

HANNAH ESCALANTE 
CORRIE EVERSON 
ALMAZ FERE 
FELICIA FETT 
KRISTA FIALA 



JANEL FILBECK 
LAUREN FINNEY 
RACHEL FISHER 
LAURA FLESCHNER 
WHITNEY FOSTER 
NICHOLAS FRAIZER 



Juniors 



71 




SARAH FREDERICKS 

KATHRYN FRIAS 

ANTONIO FUNCHES 

MEGHAN GAGE 

FRANCIS GANTNER 

DEEANN GARVIN 



MELISSA GARWOOD 

MICHAEL GARZA 

EMILY GOERGEN 

MOLLY GOLDBACH 

ELIZABETH GOLLE 

SHANNON HANCOCK 



DESMOND HANDSON 

KATHERINE HANNAGAN 

MARTHA HARROUFF 

KATE HAUSKEN 

EMILY HAY 

REBEKAH HAZEN 



CHAD HEMPHILL 

JERRY HENDRICKSON 

TESSIE HERBERT 

MICHAEL HILEMAN 

AUSTIN HILL 

DAVID HOFFMANN 




H 








LA 





KEISHA HOLLIS 
COREY HOLTZ 
JOSHUA HOWELLS 
JEREMY HUISH 
NATHAN IWEMA 
CHRISTINA JENSEN 



COLE JENSEN 
MITCHELL JOHNSON 
AMANDA JOSEPH 
MICHELE KECKLER 
ERIN KENNELL 
EUNJI KIM 



ERICA KIMMEL 
DANETTE KINNISON 
MATTHEW KIRKPATRICK 
CHERISH KLOSSING 
RYAN KNAPP 
ANDREW KNOL 



DAYNA KNOX 
KELLY KRAKER 
STEVEN KRUEGER 
HANNAH KRUSE 
REBECCA LANKFORD 
KENNETH LAUTENBACH 



Juniors 



73 






uniors 



CHRISTY LAWRENCE 

JORDAN LEWIS 

CHRISTINA LIAKOPOULOS 

LYDIA LINSNER 

RYAN LOGAN 

JESSICA LOPEZ 



ALEXANDRIA LORD 

MELANIE LOULOUSIS 

KYLE LOWRY 

BLAINE MANNING 

SHAYNA MARIN 

MICHELLE MARQUIS 



ASHLI MARRIER 

OLIVIA MARTIN 

CASEY MAST 

KRISTIN MATHIAS 

IAN MATTHEWS 

AMANDA MAZZARO 



KATIE MCCOOEY 
KATE MCGILL 
ALLISON MCGUIRE 
ASHLEY MCGUIRE 
JOSHUA MCLAREN 
NICOLE MERRY 





DAVID MICHAELS 
JONI MILLER 
STEPHEN MILLER 
SHAWN MIRANDA 
COLTON MOORE 
ATHINA MOREHOUSE 



ALISA MORRIS 
JAMES MURRAY 
IAN NALDI 
JACOB NALDI 
RYAN NELSON 
JASON NEWKIRK 



KARYN NICHOLS 
KEITH NUNEZ 
JOHN NUTTER 
STACI OLIVER 
GRETCHEN OSWALT 
DANIEL PALMER 



BRITTANY PALS 
ALLISON PARK 
DAVID PARSONS 
JORDAN PAULSEN 
HEATHER PAVLIK 
DONTE PAYNE 



Iff .if; 



Juniors 



75 



n 



umor 



VANESSA PEARSON 

AUDREY PENROD 

KATHRYN PEUGH 

HOLLY PFLEDERER 

DAVID PICONE 

JANA PIERCE 



DANIELLE PIPAL 

JENNA PLESE 

CHRISTINA POE 

ELISABETH POND 

THOMAS POWERS 

AMY PRICE 



JACLYN PUROLL 

MORGAN RADZIMINOWSKI 

DIANE RANKIN 

ADAM READER 

LUVERTA REAMES 

ALLISON REED 



JUSTIN REISINGER 

JORDAN REYNOLDS 

NICHOLE RHODES 

ANDREA RICHARDSON 

HEIDI RICHARDSON 

CARRIE RIEGLE 





ALEX RIPBERGER 
ANGELA RIVAS 
KRISTA ROBYN 
KAYLA ROLLING 
CHERISE ROSENBERG 
BETH RUFF 



KYLE RYBOLT 
ALAINE SANCHEZ 
GEOFF SAUTER 
EMILY SCHAACK 
JACOB SCHMIDT 
CATHERINE SCHUTT 



HANNAH SCOTT 
GARRETT SEVIGNY 
CASSANDRA SHATTUCK 
JOHN SHOFFSTALL 
TYLER SHORE 
HANNAH SHORT 



SARAH SINN 
KRISTA SKELTON 
JAMES SMIT 
KAITLIN SMITH 
FAITH SORENSON 
SHARA SOUTHERLAND 



Juniors 



77 



umors 



MEREDITH SPAINHOUR 

EMILY SPUNAUGLE 

NICOLE STANISZESKI 

RACHEL STEEN 

SARAH STEPHANSEN 

BRYAN STEVENS 



JOSH STONE 

CAITLIN SWEET 

AMY SWIHART 

MELISSA TANNER 

CARRIE TAPP 

SARA TAYLOR 



GINA TEMELCOFF 

CAMBRIA THOMAS 

ASHLEY THOMPSON 

KRISTIN THOMPSON 

JOSHUA TRACY 

CARL TRANK 



DAVID TURNER 

DAVID ULRICH 

DANIELLE VANDERSCHAAF 

TYLER VANDERSCHAAF 

MICHELLE VANDOORNE 

JESSICA VOSS 





EMILY WADE 
ALANNA WALDVOGEL 
NATHANIEL WALLER 
EMILY WALTERS 
RACHEL WALTZ 
EMILY WASKOW 



JOSEPH WEBER 
TODD WEIDERMAN 
MATTHEW WELLS 
ELIZABETH WHITE 
SARAH WHITTEN 
ETHAN WIDECAN 



JENNA WILEY 
MEGAN WILLE 
ANGELA WILLIAMS 
STEPHANIE WILLIAMS 
HEATHER WILLOUGHBY 
MEGAN WRIGHT 



KRISTA YABSLEY 
EMILY YOUNGLOVE 
MAGDALENA ZAJKOWSKI 
DANAE ZARBUCK 
SARAH ZELHART 
BEN ZWOLINSKI 



Juniors 



79 



ukas Schindler 




Most students have dreams 
of traveling around the world and 
perhaps spending a month or a 
semester abroad. For sophomore 
Lukas Schindler, the adjustment 
and new adventure began when he 
came to America, at the start of 
college at Olivet Nazarene Univer- 
sity. Lukas's parents are now mis- 
sionaries in Sprockhbvel-Hassling- 
hausen, Germany and he, his older 
brother Erich, and his older sister 
Monica grew up in Mannheim and 
then Kaiserslaufern, Germany. He 
attended German public schools 
from first grade to the first se- 
mester of his freshman year, but 
then transferred to a boarding 
school for missionary kids in the 
black forest of Germany his sec- 
ond semester of freshman year of 
high school. 

Though Lukas's sister and 
grandparents live in Wheaton, he 
chose to attend Olivet because 
he wanted to attend a liberal arts 
college and felt that Olivet was a 
good size. He also wanted to ma- 
jor in Social Work and felt that Ol- 
ivet's program would fi t well with 
his future plans. Lukas is now work- 
ing towards both Social Work and 
Criminal Justice majors, although 
he says he knows he does not 
want to be a cop. 



Although Olivet has been a good 
fit, moving to a new school in a 
new country has not been with- 
out its share of challenges. Lukas 
admits that he misses Germany 
and his family a lot, "especially ihisl 
parents." He says that it is also 
tough when students complain 
about not having been home for 
a while and he thinks about how 
long it has been since he has been 
'home.' The culture shock of ad- 
justing to this new home has not 
been easy either: "You don't know 
what's coming at you, it's a differ- 
ent pace of life here. It's faster. Ev- 
erything is going" Lukas tells us. 

Despite the difficulties, Lukas 
has enjoyed the change and has 
relished and risen to the challeng- 
es that have come his way. He has 
gotten involved in Mu Kappa, and 
is the treasurer this school year. 
He also works in Sodexo, behind 
the stir-fry counter and says, "It is 
one of the best jobs." Lukas en- 
joys being able to talk to the stu- 
dents and serve them one of the 
most highly rated entrees on the 
Sodexo menu. 



The school has been a good 
fi t in helping Lukas achieve his fu- 
ture goals as well. He says that he 
plans to stay in the United States 
for at least 5-10 years after grad- 
uation and hopefully find a job as 
a social worker and work perhaps 
work with juvenile delinquents or 
those struggling with substance 
abuse. He says he is interested in 
doing social work in tangible ways 
like providing food or assistance 
or aid to people who really need 
it. No matter where he is or what 
he is doing though, Lukas says, "I 
want to help people-that's what 
drives me." 



Kayla Koury 



People 

81 





1. Ryan London partcipated in the ulitmate frisbee game against the Juniors, (cb) 2. Ryan Shrout wearing his birthday hat to celebrate the 
sophomores fl rst ever "It's your birthday" fi esta, the event was a huge success, (cb) 3. Jake Ridenour eats some of the yummy cupcakes 
and icecream at the sophomore fiesta, (cb) 4. Jeremy Height enjoys some time off campus with fellow classmates, (cb) 5. Joe Schindel 
and Sefh Perry working to break the pinata and win some candy, (cb) 6. Taylor Polatas is excited to do some flips at the block party, (cb) | 
7. These sophomore girls enjoyed spending time together eating candy at the block party, (cb) 8. Katie Dirske enjoys getting to take a 
break from study and spend some time having fun at the sophomore birthday party, (cb) 




MELODY ABBOTT 
BETHANY ADDINGTON 
SAMANTHA AKRE 
ALYSSA ALBERICO 



LAURA ALEXANDER 
SHELBY ALLEN 
ASHLAN ALLISON 
CIERRA ANDECOVER 



ARTIKA ANDERSON 
MARTHA ARNTSON 
ANNE ATWATER 
JOSEPH BADAGLIACCO 



SEBASTIANA BASHAM 
KASSANDRA BAUER 
LAUREN BEATTY 
JAMI BEILER 



CALEB BERNHARDT 
KELSEA BEVILLE 
ZACHARY BISHOP 
KAYLA BISSONETTE 



Sophomores 

83 



■rawSsEi;::: 




TIMOTHY BLAKE 

KAITLYN BLAKELEY 

JOSEPH BLANEY 

EMILY BLANTON 



SARAH BODNER 

DANIELLE BOLANDER 

JORDAN BOND 

MICHELLE BOOKER 



ABIGAIL BORLAND 

ELIZABETH BOTT 

JACOB BOYCE 

KATHLEEN BOYNTON 



CASSANDRA BRAINARD 

JOHN BRINK 

KELLI BROWN 

MADELINE BROWNING 



AARON BUCHANAN 

KATHERINE BULTEMA 

ETHAN BURCH 

LANDON BURRIS 








fit 7i$*9 Easy. 




NATALIE BURSZTYNSKY 
OLIVIA BUS 
MELISSA BUSETH 
JONATHAN CABLE 



KENDRA CABLE 
CLINTON CABRERA 
EMILY CALDWELL 
JACOB CALDWELL 



ASHLEY CAMDEN 
KARISSA CANTRALL 
KELLY CAREY 
ERIC CARLISLE 



JULIE CARLSON 
SARA CARLSON 
NICOLE CARR 
JORDAN CARSTENS 



RYAN CAWVEY 
OLIVIA CHEATHAM 
BENJAMIN CHERNEY 
KAYLIE CHURCH 



Sophomores 

85 



SAMANTHA CLARK 

LAUREN CLOUTER 

CHASE COHAGAN 

CASSANDRA COLLINS 




REBECCA COMPTON 

SARAH CONDREAY 

SARAH COOK 

SHAWNN COOPER 



JONATHAN COULMAN 

KELLEE COUSINS 

ALEXANDRA COX 

CLARISSA COX 



HANNAH CROW/DER 

JOSE CRUZ 

KRISTY CZYZNIEJEWSKI 

CASSANDRA DAER 





7t_ 




MATTHEW DAVENPORT 

ASHTON DAVEY 

SARAH DAVIS 

BRADLEY DEAL 





JOEL DECKARD 
ASHLEY DESROCHERS 
ASHLEY DEVRIES 
NICOLE DEVRIES 



NICHOLAS DICKRELL 
NICOLE DIER 
EMILY DILLARD 
AMY DILLMAN 



CONNOR DIMICK 
JESSICA DISLVESTRO 
KELSEY DIXON 
MICHAEL DOHERTY 



RACHEL DOMAOAL 
KATELYN DUNKMAN 
OLIVIA EATON 
JONATHAN ECCLES 



STEPHANIE EDENS 
CHRISTOPHER EHLENFELD 
KORTNEY ELLINGBOE 
HANNAH ENDRIZZI 



Sophomores 

87 



ophom 



KARA ENGEL 

SAMANTHA ENGELLAND 

JENNIFER ENGELSEN 

JONATHAN ERDAHL 



DANNY ERNEST 

AMANDA ESKEW 

ANDRES ESOUETINI 

ALISHA EVANS 



CHAD EVANS 

KELLY FAGERBURG 

LUCAS FAIN 

KATHLEEN FARRIS 



KATLYN FARRIS 

CHRISTOPHER FIELD 

TARA FIELDHOUSE 

AARON FLORIAN 



JOY FOSNAUGH 

KAYLA FOSTER 

TAYLIN FRAME 

NEIL FRAZER 





TIANNA FREY 
KEVIN FRIAS 
MCKENZIE FRITCH 
CHAD FROW/NFELTER 



CAMERON FRYE 
GEOFFREY FULLER 
CHRIS GACUTAN 
JACOB GALLOWAY 



BEN GARCIA 
NICHOLAS GARCIA 
MATTHEW GARGIULO 
STACEY GERSTUNG 



REETU GHOTRA 
JOSHUA GILL 
RACHEL GILMORE 
DENNIS GLOODT 



ASHLEY GOAD 
CAROLYN GOETTSCH 
DIEGO GONSALVEZ 
JACOB GOODSPEED 



Sophomores 

89 




JADE GREEN 

ANDREA GREGORY 

JACOB GREGORY 

JOSHUA GRIFFES 



RACHEL GROTERS 

GABRIELLE GUEBERT 

LANA GUINN 

ASHLEY HALL 



KYLE HANCE 

ASHTON HANES 

KATHRYN HANLEY 

JORDAN HANSEN 



JESSICA HARPER 

LAUREN HARRIS 

RACHAEL HARTMAN 

LAUREN HATHAWAY 



LINDSEY HAYES 

TAYLOR HAYMES 

CHELSEA HAYS 

DESIREE HAYS 












at. 


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/ 


• fe 




, *' 


" L'- : i 


I, 










* JH9JL, 




JORDAN HEDGE 
KELLY HEDTCKE 
JEREMY HEIGHT 
BENJAMIN HEINCKER 



ABIGAIL HELMKER 
KYLE HENNING 
KARA HEPLER 
ELENA HERATH 



JAMIE HILL 
DAVID HINES 
STEPHANIE HOBSON 
SHANNA HOEKSTRA 



BETHANY HOLAWAY 
LAURA HOLDHAM 
KATELYN HOLMER 
GW/ENDELYN HOLMES 



JENNIFER HORNE 
JACOB HOSKINS 
BETHANY HOTLE 
JEREMY HOVING 



Sophomores 

91 



ophomor 



RACHEL HOWE 

KATHERINE HOZIAN 

TYLER HUBBELL 

ELIZABETH HUEBNER 



JOHN HUGHES 

MEGAN HUNTSMAN 

MATTHEW HUYSER 

MEGAN JACKSON 



ANDREW JENSEN 

SARAH JENSEN 

ANDREW JERRICK 

AUSTIN JOHNSON 



LOGAN JOHNSON 

DEVIN JOHNSTON 

LAUREN JONES 

MELINDA JONES 



HANNAH JUNE 

MOLLY KARENKE 

CAROLL KARNS 

JILLIAN KARRICK 





RACHEL KEARNEY 
LAUREN KEENER 
MEGAN KEPLER 
CAITLYN KING 






COURTNEY KINSTLE 
GABRIELLE KIRBY 
JUSTYNE KIRCHNER 
LINDSEY KIRCHNER 



FAREN KIRKLAND 
EMILY KLINEFELTER 
MEGAN KLOSSING 
MARY KOCH 



ZACHARY KOHLMEIER 
KIMBERLY KRATZ 
ELIZABETH KUHNS 
LISA KURTZ 



MICHELLE KURTZ 
SHELBY LAKINS 
CASSIDY LANCASTER 
SARAH LANGELAND 



Sophomores 

93 




MARYBETH LANGKAMP 

KAYLEE LAPENAS 

ARELI LARA 

KEVIN LASOWSKI 



BRENDEN LAUTENBACH 

KAYLA LAYMAN 

RYAN LEANDER 

CHRISTOPHER LEFEVRE 



CRYSTELLE LEMAY 

STEPHANIE LIAKOPOULOS 

RYAN LINGLE 

JOSEPH LOGALBO 



BRIANNA LOMAS 

KAITLIN LOOS 

MARY LORENZ 

AUTUMN LOURASH 



SARAH LOVE 

CHELSEA LUBBEN 

AMANDA LUBY 

JONATHAN LYLE 





JOY MACDONALD 
LISA MACDONOUGH 
LUCAS MADDING 
BRITNEY MARKO 



HEATHER MARRS 
TAYLOR MARTIN 
JOY MATTHEWS 
RACHEL MAUPIN 



KYLE MCGUIRE 
SETH MCKINLEY 
NATHANIEL MCMANUS 
DANIELLE MCNAMARA 



KELSEY MCNULTY 
CAITLIN MCPHERSON 
CHRISTOPHER MEANS 
BETHANY MEREDITH 



MORGAN MESSER 

RYAN MIEDEMA 
AUDREY MIKHAIL 
AMANDA MILLER 



Sophomores 

95 



ophomo 




BETHANY MILLER 

CASEY MILLES 

ALYSSA MITCHELL 

ALISON MONKEMEYER 



JACOB MOORE 

RACHEL MOORE 

SARAH MOORE 

ASHLEY MORTENSEN 



JEAN MOSEY 

JULIANNA MUNYON 

PATRICK MURPHY 

SAMANTHA MURPHY 



KELLY NELSON 

KELSEY NEWLIN 

JOSS NICHOLSON 

KIRSTEN NIEDERWIMMER 



HOLLY NIXON 

ALYSSA NORDEN 

MARGARET O'NEILL 

EMILY OHSE 





LINNEA ORNE 
ERIK OTTE 
HANNAH PARGULSKI 
DAVID PARKER 



SARA PARKER 
EMILY PASCARELLA 
FREYA PATRICK 
ISAIAH PEACHEY 



WHITNEY PELLETIER 
SETH PERRY 
DANA PETERSON 
JAMES PHILLIPS 



ASHLEY PITZER 
TAYLOR POLATAS 
MEGAN POLSLEY 
SEAN PORTS 



MARCUS POWERS 
MELISSA PRICE 
MEGAN RADCLIFFE 
ASHLEY RAFFAUF 



Sophomores 

97 





MEAGAN RAMSAY 

TRAVIS RASMUSSEN 

JESSICA RAWLINGS 

ANNA REED 



MILEY REED 

KOLTON REEVERTS 

WILLIAM REILLY 

KRISTIN RINEHART 



JOSHUA RING 

ELISE RIVETT 

PETER ROBINSON 

JEREMY ROESEL 



REBEKAH ROGERS 

JACQUELINE ROSE 

PAULA SAEWERT 

JACOB SALEM 



JOSUE SANCHEZ 

LUCAS SANOR 

CHRISTY SAWDON 

MARY SCHAACK 





JOSEPH SCHINDEL 
CLARISSA SCHLEGEL 
HANNAH SCHMIDT 
JENNIFER SCHOENWETTER 



STEPHANIE SCHUEMAN 
KAITLIN SCHULTZ 
KAITLIN SCHULTZ 
KATELYN SCHULTZ 



PAiGE SCHWARTZ 
CHRIS SCOTT 
KIMBERLY SEGRAVES 
STEPHANIE SEDL 



KYLE SHAUGHNESSY 
KYLE SHELTON 
LAURA SHICKLES 
MOLLY SHIROSKY 



RYAN SHROUT 
KELCIE SIROIS 
CATHERINE SIW/INSKI 
KACCEY SKRBEC 



Sophomores 

99 



ophom 



NICOLE SLOAN 

VICTORIA SMALLEGAN 

MATTHEW SMITH 

EDSON SOLARES 



KALEB SOLLER 
DUSTIN SOUTHE 
CHELSEA SPEAS 
LANDON STARK 



SAMANTHA STARNER 

JORDAN STAUFFENBERG 

TAYLOR STEPHENS 

ALLISON STEVENS 



KRISTEN STEVENS 

KRISTEN STEVENS 

ALEXANDRA STEWARD 

REBEKAH STEWART 



CLARA STONE 

NICOLE STONE 

DANIELLE STRANGE 

LAUREN STREICHER 




m 




BLAKE SW ANSON 
WHITNEY SWICK 
ALEXANDER SWICKARD 
JUSTIN TANNEHILL 



WESLEY TAYLOR 
KAMERON THEEDE 
ANNA THEIS 
TIM THOMAS 



ZACHARY THOMAS 
KYLE THOMPSON 
MARCIE THOMPSON 
ELIZABETH THRALL 



KATHARINE TOLLENAAR 
MELANIE TOPPMEYER 
OUINN TRELEVEN 
RACHEL TSCHETTER 



HEIDI UNGER 
OLIVIA UTHAIWAT 
JENNIFER VALPATIC 
JACKLYN VANDERLAAN 



Sophomores 

101 



BRITTANY VANDERNAALD 

ASHLEY VANDERSCHAAF 

MATTHEW VANDYKE 

JULIAN VERSWEYVELD 



RACHEL VONARB 

CAYLEE WAGNER 

ELIZABETH WALKER 

SARAH WALTON 



SARAH WARD 

SARA WARNER 

KELSEY WATSON 

HANNAH WEITZEL 



JENNIFER WHITE 

CORRINE WIERINGA 

LISABETH WLKE 

ALYSSA WILKINS 



ALICIA WILLIAMS 

BRYANT WILLIAMS 

REBECCA WILLIAMS 

TAYLOR WILLIAMSON 





JENNIFER WILSON 
KATHERINE WILSON 
MATTHEW WILSON 
ALLISON WISEMAN 



DIANNA WOOD 

EMILY WOOD 
ANDREW WOODHULL 
BENJAMIN WORNER 



KIMBERLY WYMAN 
REBECCA YATES 
KORISSA YERGLER 
EMILY YODER 



BAILEY ZELENGA 



Sophomores 

103 



People come to Olivet with 
lots of different stories and back- 
grounds. Some come here after a 
split second decision, while some 
have made their decision years pri- 
or. Some come from large families, 
others from small. These unique 
stories and backgrounds make our 
student body diverse, and every 
story winds itself in with the story 
of Olivet. 

Lanae Harding is a freshman 
this year, so her Olivet story is 
just beginning. She has only been 
on campus for a few months but 
has already made some big deci- 
sions, made new friends, and be- 
gan to settle into life as a college 
student. 

Lanae is from Galesburg, Illinois. 
She is an only child and lives with 
her father, Jay, who is a policeman, 
and her mother, Janeen, who is a 
stay-at-home mom. Lanae went 
to a Christian school from fi rst to 
fifth grade, but then the Christian 
high school was shut down and 
she and her parents made the de- 
cision that she would not attend 
public school. Lanae says she liked 
home schooling because if taught 
her how to discipline herself to get 
her work done; a skill that would 
be very useful in college. She also 
enjoyed being able to set her own 
pace. She became very involved 



with the praise band at her local 
church, Galesburg First Church of 
the Nazarene, as well as participat- 
ing in skits for children's church. 

The decision to come to Ol- 
ivet was easy since it is the school 
where many of her family mem- 
bers attended before her. Since 
coming to Olivet in September of 
2010 Lanae has gotten involved in 
the Sister-2-Sister program and 
enjoys spending time with her 
'older sister,' Martha Harrouff. 

Lanae has always been a hard 
worker. She entered her freshman 
year already having thirty credits, 
all accumulated from a commu- 
nity college for classes she took 
her senior year of high school. 
Lanae started at Olivet as a pre- 
med major because she wanted 
to be an OB. But after experienc- 
ing her first few science classes 
Lanae decided pre-med was not 
the right fi f for her. She changed 
her major to Spanish and hopes to 
perhaps teach at the college level 
some day. She is really looking for- 
ward to the opportunity to study 
abroad in Spain her junior year of 
college. 



One thing that really drives 
Lanae is her involvement in mu- 
sic. She started taking piano les- 
sons when she was four and has 
been playing for fourteen years 
now. Lanae says, "I enjoy the prac- 
tice. I like to get away from all the 
studying and the dorms. I love to 
practice in Larsen at night because 
no one is there. It's so quiet." Lanae 
spends at least two hours a day in 
the practice rooms practicing pia- 
no. She plays songs because she 
is not a big fan of scales. 

Lanae is enjoying her life at 
Olivet so far and looks forward to 
what the next three years will bring 
for her. When asked what drives 
her to work so hard and practice 
and be so diligent in her life, she 
responds by saying, "I could say 
the Sunday school answer-Jesus. 
But it's knowing God has a plan for 
me; I want to make that plan come 
true and do what He wants me to 
do." 

- Kayla Koury 



People 

105 






1. Christy Trank and Emily Heinz enjoy baking. "Sometimes I just bake the refrigerated cookie dough." Christy comments, (cl) 2. Heather Mead, Michael 
Kirkpatrick and Michelle Spencer smack hands while playing the popular campus game "mnja." (cl) 3. Freshman orientation allowed Andrew Muzljakovich 
and Marshall Harris the chance to bond, (kb) 4. Being a freshman brings it's fair share of humiliation, as John Dalh and Trevor Dodsworth discover, (cl) 5. 
Despite a rather tiny fire. Max Ripberger and his fellow classmates jumped at the chance to roast marshmallows at the class bonfire, (kb) 6. Freshmen girls 
get acquainted while watching an intramural soccer match, (kb) 7. During a freshmen connections convocation, Lauren Anderson and Kyle Stachewicz won 
ten dollars from Dr. Jay Martinson for having the most cell phone contacts of fellow Olivet students, (cl) 8. Ross Johnson listens intently on his first day of 
college classes, (cl) 




SARAH ABNER 
OLUWAYONDA ABOGUNRIN 
NICOLE ACKERMAN 
ANDREW ACOSTA 
KAREEM ADEWOLE 
SOMONE AGERS 



RYNE ALBERICO 
JOSE ALCANTAR 
CAMERON ALCORN 
BRANDON ALLISON 
HANNAH ALLISON 
ALYSSA ALT 



JUSTIN AMBROSIA 
AMBER ANDERSEN 
ALLISON ANDERSON 
BRETT ANDERSON 
LAUREN ANDERSON 
EMILY ARNOLD 



RIVKA ATADJA 
KRISTIN ATTIG 
JEREMY ATWOOD 
LACEY AUSTIN 
JESSICA BACHELOR 
JONATHAN BADER 



JASON BAKER 
JUNAID BAKR 
BREANNE BAMBRICK 
ANDREW BARNARD 
BRANDON BARNARD 
SETH BARRIGEAR 



Freshmen 



107 




ELIZABETH BART 

WILLIAM BARTH 

LYNNETTE BASSFORD 

LEZLIE BAULER 

AYRIS BECK 

STEVEN BECKHAM 



BROOKE BELLAMY 

MATTHEW BENNETT 

SARAH BERKA 

BRENNEN BERRY 

ELISEO BETANCOURT 

TODD BEVAN 



APRIL BIDDLE 

SYDNEY BLAND 

LISA BOAZ 

EMILY BORGER 

CHRISTOPHER BOTTARI 

STACI BRADBURY 



ANTONETTE BRANDES 

RICHARD BREEDEN 

ANOUK BREUKER 

MELANIE BREUNIG 

HANNAH BREWER 

KOURTNEY BRIDGEW/ATER 



JORDAN BRITT 

KAITLYN BROCKMAN 

STEPHANIE BRUENNING 

JOSHUA BRUNER 

TITUS BRYAN 

BRANDY BUCKHOLT 





JAMISON BURCHFELD 
BRENDAN BURGER 
DANIELLE BURGETT 
EUGENE BURNDAM 
ANDREW BURRINGTON 
REBECCA BUSLER 



ADRIAN CALHOUN 
HANNAH CAMPBELL 
WILLIAM CAREY 
KAITLIN CARLSON 
RACHEL CARMAN 
CAMERON CARPENTER 



CALEB CARR 
DANIEL CARRIGAN 
JORDAN CARROLL 
MICHAEL CARTER 
TYLER CARY 
KELLY CASLLAS 



KYLE CASTEN 
KELSEY CASTLEMAN 
ALYSSA CASWELL 
ZACHARY CATALDO 
CHRISTINE CAVEN 
FAITH CAVENDER 



ALYSSA CHAMBERS 
KATLYNN CHAMBLESS 
BETHANY CHATMAN 
LINDSAY CHENOWETH 
ANDREW CHRISTIANSEN 
SARAH COCHRAN 



Freshmen 

109 





JAMILA COKER 

EMILY COLE 

AYLA CONNELL 

STEPHANIE CONNOLLEY 

COURTNEY COOK 

JOCELYN COOK 



KATLYN COSER 

ELIZABETH COUNTS 

ANDREW COWEN 

REBECCA CROFOOT 

JENNA CROOKSHANKS 

ABIGAIL CROW/DER 



BRANDI CURTIS 

MEGAN CWAYNA 

BENJAMIN DAFGARD 

JOHN DAHL 

TARYN DAHLOUIST 

MITCHELL DALE 



JONATHAN DAMRON 

CLAIRE DANA 

ALYSSA DAVILA 

CAMILLE DAVIS 

JUSTIN DAVIS 

KERRIELLE DAVIS 



MICHAEL DAVIS 
VICTORIA DEAN 
VICTORIA DEAN 
RYAN DEGUTIS 
DEREK DELGADO 
JENNA DEMPSAY 




t. 




DREW DENNIS 
ANNA DEPUTY 
MICHELLE DERAMOS 
RACHEL DEVINE 
ALEX DEWEES 
SHELLEY DEXTER 



APRIL DHENNIN 
KELLIE DIGNAN 
SARA DILEONARDO 
STEPHANIE DILLMAN 
KEVIN DINEEN 
ASHLEY DINNEWETH 



CHRISTIAN DOBBS 
DANIELLE DOBECK 
TREAVOR DODSWORTH 
JENSINE DORIAN 
MEGAN DOWELL 
SHAWN DOWNEY 



ALEXANDRA DOYLE 
RYAN DRENTH 
TRISHA DUNCAN 
NORA DURKIN 
KYLE EASTMAN 
ELIZABETH EDDY 



KENZIE EDWARDS 

BETH ELLCESSOR 
MATTHEW ELLESS 
ALINA ELLIS 
LAUREN ELLIS 
SCOTT ELLIS 



Freshmen 




MEGAN ELROY 

JULIE EMMONS 

BIANCA ENGELLAND 

AUSTIN ESKEW 

JUSTINE ESPERSEN 

NICOLE EULERT 



ERIN EVANS 

JENNIFER EWING 

CHANTALLE FALCONER 

NOAH FEATHERSTONE 

NATHANIEL FERRIS 

JENELLE FIELDS 



JONATHAN FIGHTMASTER 

MATTHEW FINLEY 

AIMEE FISH 

ZACH FISHER 

DAVID FLACK 

FELICIA FLARY 



CRYSTAL FLECK 

AISHA FODAY 

JACOUELYN FORD 

THOMAS FRANCOEUR 

KEVIN FRANKLIN 

MEGAN FRANSEEN 



JACKIE FREED 

MELISSA FREEMAN 

ASHLEY FRENCH 

TASHA FRENCH 

MARVIN FRYE 

HANNAH FUNSTON 





ANDREW GAHAGEN 
ROBBY GAINES 
RONALD GAMACHE 
HANNAH GARDNER 
TANNER GARNER 
REBECCA GARST 



LAURA GARWOOD 
STACEY GASH 
GABRIELLE GAYTAN 
BENJAMIN GEEDING 
MIRANDA GEEVER 
NICHOLAS GEEVER 



BRAD GERWIN 
BRADLEY GIAMALVA 
ALYSSA GIBSON 
CANDICE GIBSON 
RYAN GIFFORD 
REBECCA GILES 



BRIAN GINN 
CASSIDY GLANDON 
BRENA GLENDENNING 
ASHLEY GLOVER 
CRISTINA GOMEZ 
TARA GONZALEZ 



BRITTANY GOODMAN 
REBECCA GOODMAN 
MICHELE GOODWIN 
MARK GORDON 
AMY GRAYSON 
DARRIN GREENE 



Freshmen 

113 




JULIA GREGORY 

JERI GREVIS 

ANNA GRIEDER 

ALLISON GRIGUS 

ALLYSE GROOVER 

MICHELLE GROVE 



LILLIAN GUENSETH 

JENNA HAENNI 

JESSICA HAFNER 

JOHN HALL 

LAUREN HALL 

ERICA HAMMOND 



HYEBIN HAN 

LANAE HARDING 

BRANDON HARRIS 

DANYNE HARRIS 

MARSHALL HARRIS 

MICHAEL HARRISON 



TIMOTHY HARRISON 

DE'NECE HARRISON-HUDSON 

LUKE HASSELBRING 

CRYSTAL HAURI 

LAUREN HAUSKEN 

MICHAEL HEDRICK 



EMILY HEINZ 

JENNA HELDT 

JOANNA HELMKER 

KATHERINE HENSON 

ELIAS HERNANDEZ 

GINA HESS 





JOY HESS 

HALEY HETFLEISCH 
ALLISON HILL 
CHRISTOPHER HINRICHS 
ALEXANDRIA HODGES 
JORIE HOFFRAGE 



APRIL HOGAN 
ELISABETH HOLAWAY 
BENJAMIN HOLT 
KEITHCHRISTIAN HUFFMAN 
BENJAMIN HUI 
JONATHON HUIZENGA 



MATTHEW HURST 
KEEGAN HURT 
BRIANNA HUTCHINS 
TAYLOR HUTSON 
CHARNISE HUTTON 
MARY ANN ICENOGLE 



LUKE IMBERY 
CHRISTOPHER INGERSOL 
JORDAN JACKSON 
ROBERT JACKSON 
WILLIAM JAMES 
STEPHANIE JANSMA 



ALLISON JAVORKA 
ERICA JENKINS 
GLORIA JENTZ 
MEILING JIN 
KARSTI JOHNSON 
LAUREN JOHNSON 



Freshmen 

115 




LINDSEY JOHNSON 
RILEY JOHNSON 
ROSS JOHNSON 

TAYLOR JOHNSON 

MARC JONES 

JUSTINE JOSMA 



I 8HHMHI 



BRANDON JUODIKIS 

TYLER KARRAKER 

RYAN KEE 

AUTUMN KEISS 

NICKOLAS KELLAR 

MOLLY KELLIE 



ALEX KELLOGG 

BENJAMIN KELSEY 

KRISTIN KENNEDY 

WILLIAM KENNEDY 

KATRINA KENNY 

TRAVIS KESSELL 



REYNAULDT KEYS 

RACHEL KILBRY 

MACKENNA KING 

BRADLEY KINNISON 

MICHAEL KIRKPATRICK 

QUEEN KISOSO 



BRANDON KLEMM 

KRISTIN KLEPITSCH 

NATHAN KLUMPE 

CRYSTAL KNIZEK 

TYLER KOCH 

MOLLY KOLECZEK 





ETHAN KRIEGER 
ELLEN KRONEW/ITTER 
MOLLI KRONST 
SAMANTHA KRYGER 
THADEUS KRYSZYN 
ALANA KRZYZAK 



JENNA KUNDE 
JOSEPHINE KUNDE 
KRISTEN KUZUR 
STEVEN LACOSSE 
KYLE LAFERNEY 
NICOLE LAFOND 



MURRELL LAGACY 
ABAGAIL LALUMENDRE 
MEGAN LALUMENDRE 
ALYSSA LAMM 
ASHLEY LANDERS 
EVAN LANE 



AUSTIN LAPPE 
CORY LARA 
CARMEN LATONA 
ALLISON LAUBENSTEIN 
JAKE LEATHERWOOD 
ANDREW LEAVITT 



MADISON LEESEBERG 
AMBER LEFFEL 
EMILY LEFFEW 
SAMANTHA LEWIS 
SHELBY LIGHT 
KASSIE UGHTNER 



Freshmen 



117 




JESSICA LINDOUIST 

KIRA LITRAS 

LEAH LIVINGSTON 

SHATINA LOCKHART 

LOGAN LONG 

MELODY LONG 



MADELYN LORENZ 

SETH LOW/ERY 

MORGAN LUCAS 

NICOLE LUSTIG 

CODY LYON 

COLIN MAHNKE 



PAIGE MALDONADO 

MATTHEW MALTESE 

THOMAS MANN 

JESSICA MANNING 

ZACHARY MANNOR 

NICOLAS MANOLOVITS 



JASON MARTIN 

TREVOR MARTINSON 

JEFFREY MASLAN 

JARED MATHISON 

JUSTIN MCCLELLAN 

CAITLIN MCCORMACK 



JACQUELINE MCCRAREN 

ASHLEY MCLAUGHLIN 

DANA MCMAHAN 

TRAVIS MCQUEEN 

HEATHER MEAD 

JENNIFER MERCER 





GABRELLE METZGER 
BETHANY MEYER 
KRYSTAL MEYER 
HANNAH MILBY 
ALAN MILLER 
ASHLEY MILLER 



HANNAH MILLER 
KATELYN MILLER 
KYLE MILLER 
LUKE MILLER 
MALLORY MILLER 
MICHAEL MILLER 



PAIGE MILLER 
RICHARD MILLER 
SCOTT MILLER 
CAITLIN MILLS 
JASON MILLS 
TYLER MINGUS 



KEITH MITCHELL 
MICHELLE MITCHELL 
ROBERT MITCHELL 
VITO MIULLI 
TRENT MOBERLY 
NICHOLAS MOHR 



NICOLE MONTALBANO 
ANDREW MOORE 
JAMES MOORE 
KENNETH MOORE 
SYDNEY MOREHEAD 
ARIEL MORGAN 



Freshmen 

119 




JACOB MORGAN 

RHANDYL MORRIS 

KATHERINE MOUNT 

DAVID MULLEN 

KATHLEEN MURRAY 

REBEKAH MUSSELMAN 



EVAN NACE 

LACEE NADIG 

ASHLEY NAFFZIGER 

AKOSUA NARTEY 

MICHAEL NEIL 

AARON NELSON 



JOHN NEUMAN 

BRITTANY NICHOLS 

KRISTIN NICHOLS 

ANDREW NELSON 

LAUREN NIXON 

NICOLE NOOTBAAR 



MORGAN NUSBAUMER 

CARL NUTTER 

DESIREE O'BRIEN 

NOLAN O'BRIEN 

KELSEY ODORAN 

MEGAN O'NEILL 



ASHLIE OLKOSKI 

HOPE OLSON 

MELINDA OSLER 

RACHEL OSWALT 

MICHAEL PAARLBERG 

RYAN PAGE 





JESSICA PALM 
BRADLEY PALMER 
SCOTT PALMER 
ANDREW PALS 
NICOLE PAPINEAU 
COLTON PARKER 



EMILY PARKER 
JOSHUA PARKER 
MAKENZIE PARKS 
SEAN PARPART 
JOSHUA PATTERSON 
PAIGE PATTERSON 



ELISE PAYNE 
AUSTIN PENDRY 
ADRIAN PEREZ 
MEGAN PERIGO 
MORGAN PERKINS 
NICK PERRI 



JOHN PETERSON 
LINDSEY PETERSON 
MOLLY PETERSON 
JAMIE PICKETT 
JOSH PIERCE 
ANTONY PERSON 



JEFFERY PIGMAN 
BETHANY PILCHER 
SAMUEL PIMPO 
MICHAEL PIOTROWSKI 
MARTIN PIPER 
CECILIA PIVARUNAS 



Freshmen 



121 




ALEX POLLOCK 

KATHERINE PONSETTO 

NICOLE POTTS 

JACOB POWELL 

KIMBERLY POWERS 

RICO PRESTIA 



AMANDA PRICE 

JACOB PRIMROSE 

MORGAN PRINCE 

BENJAMIN PRUDE 

STEVE RACHAN 

OLIVIA RAIRDEN 




LINDSEY RAMIREZ 

KRISTIN RAPACKI 

AMY RATLIFF 

RACHEL RAYNOR 

TAYLOR RECKER 

BETHANY REED 



REBECA REED 

HEIDI REICHELT 

ANDREW RED 

NICOLE REINSMA 

ALEXANDER REITER 

ELVEKA REMY 



DAVID RICE 

KRISTIN RICHARDS 

KRISTINA RICHARDSON 

MICHAEL RICHEY 

MICHELLE RICHEY 

LORISHA RILEY 





AUSTIN RINGO 
MAX RIPBERGER 
NATHANAEL RITTMEYER 
MCKENZI ROBERSON 
KATRiNA ROBISON 
BRANDON ROBYN 



JANALIS ROCHE 
JANINA ROCHE 
ARIEL ROCK 
VANESSA RODRIGUEZ 
EMILY ROESSLEIN 
BRIAN ROKEY 



BROOKE ROLFE 
ANDREW ROTHEN 
HANNAH ROW/EN 
ZACHARY RUDDLE 
HEATHER RUNYAN 
RENEE RUNYAN 



MADISON RUPERT 
BETHANY RUSH 
JACOB RYAN 
KYLE RZAB 
EDWARD SALIBA 
JONATHAN SALVACION 



THOMAS SANDERS 
VICTOR SASSANO 
ANDREW SAYRE 
ALYSSA SCHAFFER 
REBECCA SCHAVER 
DANIELL SCHEITERLE 



Freshmen 



123 




GREG SCHIMKE 

DALEY SCHIMMELPFENNIG 

MEGAN SCHNEIDER 

JEREMIAH SCHOOLER 

KATHARYN SCHRADER 

ALEXIS SCHULDT 



LAITIN SCHW/ERIN 

CHERYL SENDZIK 

SHAWN SEYMOUR 

MEGAN SHADDICK 

LAUREN SHANER 

RAVEN SHULL-DUNN 



KARA SITTON 

KRISTOPHER SLADE 

KELSEY SLAGER 

JOSHUA SMARRELLA 

LOGAN SMITH 

MARLO SMITH 



NATHANIEL SMITH 

OLIVIA SMITH 

TAYLOR SMITH 

BRANDON SONG 

RAVEN SOUTHARD 

REBEKAH SOUTHERLAND 



TYLER SOWARDS 

JONATHAN SPEAR 

MICHAEL SPEER 

BLAKE SPENCER 

NATHAN SPINNIE 

VICTORIA SPITZKE 





EMILY SPRIK 
KYLE STACHEWICZ 
JESSE STANFORD 
JEREMIAH STARK 
ZACHARY STARKWEATHER 
AINSLEY STEBBINS 



KATIE STEELMAN 
KELSEY STEINES 
MOLLY STEPHENS 
EMILY STEVENS 
AMBER STOFFEL 
MICHAEL STOFFEL 



LISA STOKELL 
REECE STOREY 
STEPHANIE STROTHMANN 
BENJAMIN STULTZ 
JESSICA STURGEON 
SHELBY STURM 



TYLER SWINDLE 
MATTHEW TABB 
KATIE TAKACS 
GRACE TALBOTT 
CLARISSA TAW/EL 
GREGORY TAYLOR 



HANNAH TAYLOR 
KADEEM TAYLOR 
ERICA TERPSTRA 
KEENAN TERRY 
JAIME TESKE 
JOHN THILL 



Freshmen 

125 




ANDREW THOMPSON 

BRIANNA THOMPSON 

NICOLE THOMPSON 

BRITNY TIMMER 

LINDSEY TOBIAS 

KAYLA TOLLEY 



BLAIRE TOMS 

SARAH TOPOREK 

SARAH TOURNEAR 

MICHELLE TOWLE 

CHRISTY TRANK 

KELLY TRIPP 




KATIE TURES 

ARIEL TURNER 

JACKLYN TUSACK 

SARAH UHEY 

CHANTEL ULATOWSKI 

MONICA VANDENEEDE 



JOY VANDERDYKE 

CHRISTOPHER VANKUIKEN 

AMBER VANMLLIGAN 

KERRY VANSYCKLE 

TRACY VANZANDBERGEN 

JULISSA VARGAS 





HILLARY VAUGHN 
JEFFREY VICTOR 
ARTHUR VICTORSON 
CAITLIN VOLZ 
ALLYSON VRABEL 
DOUG VROEGH 



CARLY WADE 
CELESTE WALBURG 
JASON WALKER 
REBECCA WALKER 
CRYSTAL WALLEM 
ALLISON WALSH 



JENNY WARD 
THOMAS WARD 
MARCUS WASHINGTON 
HEIDI WATSON 
JAMIE WATSON 
JAMES WEBB 



CHRISTINE WEBER 
JEREMY WEBER 
RACHEL WEBER 
ADAM WEEKS 
DANIEL WELLS 
WHITNEY WELLS 



Freshmen 

127 




SAMANTHA WENDELL 

SETH WENZELMAN 

BLAKE WEST 

TAYLOR WESTRATE 

KATHRYN WHITE 

NICHOLAS WIESE 



KENDRA WIKOFF 

REBECCA WILKINSON 

AUSTIN WILLIAMS 

DEREK WILLIAMS 

HANNAH WILLIAMS 

JOHN WILLIAMS 



LANDON WILLIAMS 

LAURA WILLIAMS 

RACHEL WILLIAMS 

JANESSA WILLIAMSON 

JORDAN WILLIAMSON 

BRIAN WILLOUGHBY 



EMILY WINGATE 

LAURA WINKEL 

CHRISTOPHER WINSTON 

ANNA WINTERS 

LAUREN WINTERS 

CODY WOLF 




. 





SETH WONCH 
KAITLYN WORRALL 
PAUL WRIGHT 
SAMANTHA WUSKE 
NICOLE YATES 
KAYLA YOUNGLOVE 



EWELINA ZAJKOWSKI 
KALY ZAK 
MEGAN ZAREMBSKI 
OLIVIA ZIMMER 
BRIANA ZIZIC 
MATTHEW ZLOMKE 



MERIBETH ZWEIZIG 



Freshmen 

129 




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The 2010-2011 school year has been a beginning 
of many new things on the campus of Olivet Naza- 
rene University. Students have enjoyed fresh subs 
from the Tiger den and learned how to budget their 
flex dollars for the first time; but even more signifi- 
cant than changes such as those, Olivet has erected a 
brand new chapel and appointed a new chaplain. These 
two new changes represent the forward progress of 
our school as we value and appreciate the years past 
but look forward to what is to come. 

Chaplain Mark Holcomb was asked to step info the 
position of interim-chaplain at the end of the 2009- 
2010 school year after the previous chaplain, Michael 
Benson took the position of Director of Church & Uni- 
versity Relations for Indiana. On April 1, 2010, Mark Hol- 
comb was announced as the permanent replacement 
for Chap Daddy. This appointment was not some- 
thing Chaplain Holcomb had ever anticipated hap- 
pening when he fi rst came to Olivet. He said, 1 never 
expected to be in this position. We had a chaplain. I 
came here to teach youth ministry." That being said, 
Chaplain Holcomb is very excited about his new role 
and has great plans to go forward as the "campus 
pastor" which he feels is "how he is wired" and how he 
wants to proceed in this position. 

After Chaplain Holcomb graduated from Olivet in 
1981 he decided to continue his education and earned 
a master's degree at Nazarene Theological Seminary. 
After that, he went on to be a youth pastor and served 
in that position for twenty-three years. In 2005, Chap- 
lain Holcomb was asked join the teaching faculty at 
Olivet. He accepted the position and filled his time 
with teaching part time, and then spent the other half 
of his time "mentoring and resourcing youth pastors 
in the region." Chaplain Holcomb still teaches a youth 
ministry class at Olivet and serves as the program di- 
rector for the Olivet MA program for youth ministry. 
He has a lot on his plate, but Chaplain Holcomb says. 
There's not a part of if I'm not enjoying. I like teach- 



ing, I like being able to speak as much as I do, and I like 
being able to speak into the spiritual development and 
direction of the campus." 

As far as how the new chapel fi ts into the overall 
spiritual atmosphere on campus, Chaplain Holcomb says 
it is a little early to fell. He says, "The new building won't 
change how we do chapel because I don't know that 
anything about chapel needed to change. It just chang- 
es the dynamic because everyone gets to be there and 
gets to worship together." The dynamic on campus has 
changed for Chaplain Holcomb as well. He says, "I don't 
know if I could have written a better job description." 

As Chaplain Holcomb looks to the next few years 
for the spiritual life on our campus he has high hopes 
for the discipleship groups: 1 would love for D-groups 
to be embedded in the culture here, if we have 200 to 
500 students actually sitting in a room talking with each 
other it would really create a culture here that would 
help us." These times of intimate sharing and connec- 
tion and disc-ipiling leaders is Chaplain Holcomb's focus 
and as we look to the future we can appreciate not only 
where we've come from, but these new additions to our 
campus spiritual life. 



-Kayla Koury 



Spiritual Life 

133 



■* — ■ 



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Life Counci 




1. Members of Spiritual Life Council pray together at College Church in 
preparation for Winter Revival, (ch) 2. Jessica Harper prays for a true re- 
vival, (ch) 3. Josh Gill and Courtney Cryer lead the students in worship, (ch) 
4. Students pray and sing to God at College Church, (ch) 



The Spiritual Life Council exists to overview sixteen 
different ministries; each ministry has two co-leaders. Also 
included are class chaplains, one for each class, as well as 
a Vice President, Secretary, and Treasurer. VP of Spiritual 
Life Jordan Bergren explained that his role is to "shepherd 
the council by casting a vision of where I believe God 
wants to take us." 

Bergren has been particularly encouraged by the coun- 
cil's commitment to prayer this year. "It is glorious to 
see such a big group praying and going after the same 
things," he said. 

The Spiritual Life Council members do everything from 
helping coordinate class chapel services to directly lead- 
ing different ministries, such as Urban Children's Ministry 
and Best Buddies. The groups work together with the Of- 
fl ce of Spiritual Development to guide the student body 
towards God. 

Opportunities to join a ministry supported by Spiri- 
tual Life Council are plentiful. "Being involved in a ministry 
helps facilitate community, as well as stretches one to be 
the hands and feet of Christ," Bergren said. 



-Staci Bradbury 







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5. Cassidy Lancaster and Matt Kearney listen as students give their testimonies, (ch) 6. 
Jordan Bergren leads the group in prayer, (ch) 7. Wes Siscoe prays for his fellow council 
member, (ch) 8. Students pray together for God to \ II their lives, (ch) 9. Students praise 
the Lord by singing "How He Loves." (ch) 10. Josh Gill pauses for prayer and reflection 
before leading worship, (ch) 11. A student is overcome by the Holy Spirit, (ch) 



Spiritual Life 

135 










Olivet's new Ruffatti organ shines as the music swells 
in the chapel, (ts) 2. Dr. Bowling addresses the student 
body, (ts) 3. Jase Hackman plays guitar as students enter 
chapel, (ts) 4. Students overcome the snow for morning 
service, (ts) 5. The chapel majestically stretches into the 
beautiful clear sky. (bb) 6. Jasper Taylor croons the sweet 
sounds of praise and worship, (ts) 7. Students head out 
into the cold for a day of class after morning service, 
(ts) 






Despite a change in location, the approach to chapel this year remained the same. 
Special speakers were still prayerfully sought out to discuss issues students face, such as fi nding our 
identity in Christ and allowing God to have our hearts. Two revival services created space for God to speak, gave time for 
the altars to be used, and encouraged spiritual development. As Chaplain Holcomb stated about the new chapel schedule, "I think it 
does allow us to be even more intentional with what we are doing for those two services each week." 

The new addition of the spacious Centennial Chapel has positively enabled students, faculty, and staff to experience together how 
God moved lives during the services. "When we can only have a great speaker for one day everyone can be present, and our conver- 
sation for the rest of the day in the cafeteria, classroom, and dorm can be shaped by how God is speaking to us through what they 
have said." Chaplain Holcomb said. That is why I'm excited about our new chapel. We are all moving together." 



-Hannah Pargulski 



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8. Students pile through the doors on a snowy 
Wednesday morning, (ts) 9. The jazz band 
provides music as students make their way in 
to find their seats, (ts) 10. The worship band 
leads the crowd in song and praise, (ts) 11. A 
view of the chapel's lobby, (ts) 12. The crowd 
listens intently as the message is delivered by 
Dr. Bowling. 



Spiritual Life 

137 



vva 




Every year. Fall Revival presents the opportunity for stu- 
dents, faculty, and community members to fellowship with one an- 
other and to grow deeper spiritually. The evening Revival services 
began with powerful worship music led by Brian and Kim Tabor. 
Students in Proclamation Gospel Choir, Orpheus, Chrysalis, and Tes- 
tament choirs sang enthusiastically during a different service each 
night and added an energetic presence to the worship. 

The Olivet community welcomed Dr. Jim Diehl, General Su- 
perintendent Emeritus in the Church of the Nazarene, to speak for 
the Revival services. During the sermons, he emphasized how we 
need to fan the flame of our relationship with Christ so that as it 
intensifies, we will be driven to go out into the world and show 
others His love. As senior Matt Kee noted, "Dr. Diehl challenged us 
to love God with all our being and seek Him alone, a message which 
not only convicted me but also encouraged me because God gave 
all of Himself for us, so I must freely do the same for Him." 



-Hannah Pargulski 



1. Brian and Kim Tabor, along with Orpheus choir, lead 
worship, (bb) 2. Morgan Nesbaumer and Amber Anderson 
pray together, (cl) 3. Brian Tabor leads the congregation 
in song, (cl) 4. Dr. Jim Diehl tells the audience to make it a 
point in their life to tell others about Jesus, (bb) 5. Ethan 
Burch plays guitar during revival, (cl) 6. Students called 
by the Holy Spirit pray for each other at the altar, (cl) 7. 
Lauren Cloutier praises the Lord, (bb) 








1. Kyle Owen accompanied Pastor David Busic 
to Olivet for Revival as the worship leader, (s) 

2. Pastor Busic encourages students to join 
their friends at the altar in prayer, (kb) 3. Pastor 
Busic teaches on redemption, (s) 4. Cara Sun- 
berg leads the student body in prayer, (kb) 5. 
Students come to the altar for prayer. 



"It's like Esau is Chewbacca, and Jacob is Justin Beiber," explained Winter Revival speaker Reverend David Busic. Full of memorable analo- 
gies, powerful images, and hardcore preaching, Busic was able to connect with students despite the "Snowmageddon"- as he called it- that 
hit campus in the middle of Revival. Nicole Montalbano enjoyed every service of Revival, despite having to brave the blizzard: "I felt like God 
was speaking to me to lean on Him and not let go," she said. "It brought me back to Him!" 

The Winter Revival consisted of seven messages, one each morning and night from Sunday to Wednesday. "I liked the morning services," 
Montalbano said, 'I felt like the messages he was giving were aimed towards students our age, and interesting." After discussing the need 
for. and point of, revival, Busic pounded home a message of redemption and freedom which was illustrated in the morning services by the 
life of Jacob. Although overshadowed by two days of canceled classes. Winter Revival proved to be a time of powerful spiritual renewal 
for the campus. 



-Staci Bradbury 



Spiritual Life 

139 









Church 




College Church of the Nazarene has a thriving junior high 
ministry, headed by Pastor Elizabeth Bjorling, and sup- 
ported by a myriad of Olivet students. "Getting involved 
as a leader has helped me in my own life with God," "fifth 
grade leader Beth Eddy explained, "I love the relationships 
that form out of involvement in the church." Amanda Miller, 
a seventh grade leader, also values the community. "I enjoy 
having discussions with my Kids," she said. "I love how they 
think about things and want to Know more about God and 
the Bible." 

The junior high Winter Retreat was a hit with both 
Kids and students. With the theme "Frostbite" the weekend 
consisted of two days at Bair LaKe Camp in Michigan. "The 
sing-alongs were the best," Stacey Gerstung said with a 
smile. 

Volunteering with the junior high ministry is a great 
way to get plugged into a local church by serving Kids and 
forming strong relationships with other students. "I Know 
it's crazy, but I adore those middle school Kids," stated Sta- 
cey Gerstung. 

-Staci Bradbury 



1. WorKing with Kids is one way some Olivet students choose to get 
involved in area churches, (cl) 2. Church provides music students with 
the opportunity to use their gifts for God. (cl) 3. For many students, 
worship is a highlight of Wednesday evenings, (cl) 4. Ben Hui leads wor- 
ship, (cl) 5. Madison Leeseberg sings "Mighty to Save", (cl) 6. Bethany 
Meredith dances along during a Sunday school class, (cl) 



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1. The club brought in a Santa at this 
year's Christmas party for the buddies, 
(cl) 2. Members celebrate Halloween with 
the buddies by dressing up and carving 
pumpkins, (cl) 3. Martha Arnston shares 
some qualify time with her best buddy, (cl) 
4. Katie Dirkse wraps up her buddy during 
the Best Buddies Halloween Party, (cl) 5. 
Jessica Manning and her buddy laugh and 
get to know each other, (cl) 



Best Buddies is a nationwide organization that Olivet participates in where college students are paired off with handicapped 
individuals to develop a trusting relationship and give students a way to help out in the community. There are two levels of part- 
nerships that Best Buddies officers: College, which pairs students for a year working one-on-one with a handicapped individual, 
and Associate, which allows students to move around and work with various individuals every week. 

Every week a group of Olivet students volunteer at Shapiro Development Center in Kankakee, to help build and develop rela- 
tionships with kind and welcoming residents. They also throw events for the group to help them know they are cared and loved 
for. This year the students threw a Christmas dinner event where they hired a Santa and partnered with Lifesong to provide 
music for the evening. Students who participate in this ministry love getting a chance to work with the extraordinary individuals 
and make a difference in their lives. Jami Beller said, "Not only are we able to make an impact on the buddies' lives, but they touch 
our hearts as well. This program is rewarding for everyone involved." 



-Aiiyson vrabei Spiritual Life 

141 




nafe nimsrne 




1. The Crop Walk is just one off many ways Com- 
passionate Ministries reaches out into the commu- 
nity, (cl) 2. April Dhennin and Michelle Booker en- 
courage students to take the time to learn about 
Compassionate Ministries, (cl) 3. Allison Reed, April 
Culver, and Caitlyn Crum enjoy being part of Com- 
passionate Ministries, (s) 4. Jacob Hoskins and Katie 
Norman took time to participate in the Crop Walk, 
(cl) 5. April Culver and Caitlyn Crum enjoy the Crop 
Walk during a beautiful autumn day. (cl) 



For students wanting to spread some love to the community, Compassion- 
ate Ministries is the place to be. They are passionate about reaching out and be- 
ing the hands and feet of Christ. The group runs food drives, cleans and paints 
churches and schools, visits shut-ins, assists the Salvation Army and the Center 
of Hope, and hosts special events throughout the year, like the Crop Walk. 

One highlight from this year was working with the Center of Hope, which pro- 
vides meals to hundreds of needy families in the Kankakee area. "We knew that the 
food we collected was going to make a difference for these people," stated Alli- 
son Reed. "My favorite part about it is knowing that we as college students have 
the ability to be a part of something bigger than ourselves," stated Katelyn Hol- 
mer when asked out her favorite part of being a part of Compassionate Ministries. 



Staci Bradbury 



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Disciplers is a great group for Olivet students who are 
still young at heart and love getting the chance to provide 
children with the ability to learn about God. 

Every week the group goes to Bible Witness Camp to 
help with AW ANA in Hopkins Park. Illinois, which is one of 
the poorest villages in the country. Students help the chil- 
dren, ranging from kindergarten to eighth grade, memorize 
their Bible verses. If the kids memorize all of their versus 
they are given a week of summer camp completely free 
of charge. 

Danielle Bolander, leader of Disciplers, enjoys getting 
the opportunity to make a difference in children's lives 
and knows the other volunteers do too. "Our volunteers 
learn to love the kids regardless of their background and 
it is a wonderful feeling to be able to provide love and a 
safe environment for the kids, even if it is only for a few 
hours a week." 

-Allyson Vrabel 




1. Kassi Bauer helps some of the kids present the creation 
story from Genesis, (s) 2. Lauren Hausken shares some 
time with one of the girls, (s) 3. Members sit in on the 
service to help keep students focused on the Bible story, 
(s) 4. These girls are very happy to know that they have 
someone who cares enough to come and help them, (s) 
5. Jessica Kooy helps a student memorize the week's 
verse, (s) 



Spiritual Life 

143 




Spreading light in to the darker places of our society and bringing smiles 
to the faces of those who are at times forgotten, is the mission of Evan- 
gels. Evagnels is the on-campus ministry that attends My Lady of Victory 
nursing home every Monday and Tuesday to spend a small, but significant, 
amount of time giving and receiving the light and joy of Christ to the lives 
of the residents. 

Bryan Stevens, co-leader of the ministry with Elizabeth White, is a nurs- 
ing major. Having been involved with the program for three years and 
leading for two. he has seen the progress and results of the ministry. He 
told a story of a personal experience he had with a resident named August 
or "Augi". "He always had a smile on his face, when he would roll himself in 
on his wheelchair and he would wave and greet everyone." Bryan described 
his friend saying, "he always emphasized the importance of prayer and 
how we should always be praying." 

To those who attend this weekly ministry, know it is more than just giv- 
ing, it becomes an opportunity to learn how to appreciate life and enjoy 
the time we are given. It opens hearts and allows the gap of age to be 
forgotten as people commune, learn from each other and grow in Christ. 

- Kim Kratz 



1. Lauren Wegley shares a smile with a resident, (cl) 2. 
Rachel Groters listens intently to a resident, (cl) 3. Ni- 
cole Montalbano and Warren enjoy their time together, 
(cl) 4. Elizabeth White swaps life stones, (cl) 5. Katharyn 
Schrader enjoys a meal with a new friend, (cl) 








Can an ultrasound save a life? Living Alternatives, a pregnancy center in 
Kankakee, and the group Olivetians for Life believe that it can. 

"I have a passion to be the voice of those who can't speak for themselves, 
such as the unborn child," leader Rebecca Spence said. "My favorite part has 
been watching this ministry grow since I fl rst became involved." Both the center 
and the group have grown; the pregnancy center received an ultrasound ma- 
chine from Focus on the Family and moved to a larger facility, and Olivetians for 
Life has increased in students committed to the ministry. "Sometimes the work 
we do may seem small," Spence said, "like helping them clean up the center or 
passing out ribbons at the end of chapel. But in the end, it takes the small parts 
to add up to a large success." 

"I love watching the center have more and more success in terms of how 
imany pregnancy tests they give, ultrasounds they give and how many women 
they are serving," Spence said. 

-Staci Bradbury 



1. Members help out the center by stuffing 
envelopes, (ch) 2. Rebecca Spence sees the 
value in life that others might miss, (ch) 3. 
Members carpool to Kankakee to work to 
work at the center, (bb) 4.J eff Hmkley vol- 
unteers his time, (ch) 5. Sarah Cook regularly 
makes the trip to Living Alternatives, (ch) 



Spiritual Life 

145 





Olivet is known for its amazingly talented musicians, and the 
group Lifesong brings a unique aspect to the Olivet community. 
They perform their concerts completely free of charge to churches 
and for events in the community. 

Lifesong is a group of students who volunteer because they 
have a calling to minister through music and want to be a part of 
the spiritual life on campus and in the community. Natilee Berfolozzi, 
who helps manage the group said, "We all felt a call from God to get 
together, sweat through the grueling practices, pray, and Keep our 
purpose steady for Christ." 



Although the bands put a lot of time and effort into their ministry, 
they also just enjoy being together and getting to share the same 
passion for music. More than anything, they all Know that without 
God. they would not be the same. "We couldn't have made it through 
this year without God. I give him all the glory for being such an awe- 
striKing God," said Berfolozzi. 

- Allyson Vrabel 



1. "More Than This" takes a break from all their practicing 
for a group photo, (cl) 2. "The Offering" enjoys praising the 
Lord through music, (cl) 3. Madelyn Lorenz plays her vio- 
lin, (cl) 4. Jase Hackman studies the sheet music to make 
sure he hits all the right chords, (cl) 5. Natilee Berfolozzi 
belts out a worship song during practice, (cl) 6. The group 
"Currently Unknown "really enjoys practice time and the 
fellowship that being in a band offers, (cl) 




7. Kylie McGuire, Hannah Weitzel and Lauren Finney practice a new song together, (cl) 8. 
Jacob Schmidt plays the piano (cl) 9. Josh McLaren gets into the music as he makes sure he 
has the song down for the next concert, (cl) 10. Kylie McGuire sings along to a new tune, (cl) 
11. Lauren Ciganek sings with the rest of the band during a warm-up session, (cl) 12. Nataliee 
Bertolozzi, Lauren Ciganek and Lauren Leidahl at one of their performances this year, (cl) 13. 
Lauren Leidahl, Lauren Ciganek, Natilee Bertolozzi, Jake Leatherwood, Jase Hackman, Brian 
Ginn, and Jacob Schmidt perform at the Warming House for a special occasion . (cl) 



Spiritual Life 

147 







Students fulfill the mission of MIA as they 
foster a deeper cultural understanding, (s) 2. 
A group of students scale a tower in Burki- 
na Faso. Africa, (s) 3. These student travel- 
ers pause in the airport for a picture on their 
way to Los Angeles, (s) 4. Students traveled 
to Africa to teach English, (s) 5. Groups like 
this one get the opportunity to test their lan- 
guage skills in a new environment, (s) 



Missions in Action provides a way for students to gain understanding of the chruch worldwide. "All students should 
have international or cross-cultural experience during these important years when you are forming your faith and world 
view." explained Missions in Action Director Jennifer McClellan. "Prayer and timing is everything in deciding when and where 
to go." Trips can include everything from nursing to engineering or youth ministry to disaster relief. Some, like the Egypt 
excursion are designed to help students develop insight and understanding into issues they might not have had previous 
experience with. 

'It should be out of love for Christ, not guilt," McClellan cautioned about deciding to go on on a misson trip. The 
benefits are often immediate and staggering. "During a prayer walk through a very poor compound (neighborhood) in 
Zambia, our team was just walking down the road when a boy began running alongside us and yelling to his friends, 'Jesus 
is comingi Jesus is coming!' And I realized he was referring to us. We are Him to them." For students seeking a deeper 
understanding of God's hand in new places. Missions in Action is a great opportunity. "Our goal is to inspire students to 
a lifestyle supporting God's work around the world through our missions week, special events and mission trips, stated 
McClellan. 

-Staci Bradbury 




6. Simple things like a smile transcend cultural 
barriers, (s) 7. While some trips are designed 
for students to serve, the Egypt trip helps 
foster a better understanding of other cul- 
tures, (s) 8. Luke Mingus shares his love for 
Jesus with children, (s) 9. Laura Messenger. 
Brittany Frost, Kayla Koury. and Jadon Hud- 
dleston travel to Burkina Faso. Africa, (s) 



Spiritual Life 

149 




OSS 




1. Mission Possible visits the prison to do Bible sud- 
les and encourage inmates, (cb) 2. Megan Gnse heads 
to prison for fellowship witht he inmates, (cb) 3. The 
group meets up to talk about what has been going 
on and how the club is progressing, (cb) 4. Members 
listens while the club President reviews some of the 
recent activities, (cb) 5. Laura Fleschner and Megan 
Gnse get ready to lead a bible study at the Jerome 
Combs Detention Center, (cb) 



Members of Mission Possible are passionate about sharing the love of 
Christ with the men and women at Jerome Combs Detention Center (JCDC) 
in Kankakee and conveying the truth that they are valued by the students 
and by God. 

Groups of students and team leaders visit the prison five times a week 
in order to do Bible studies and encourage the detainees there. Sophomore 
Ashley Mortensen, a team leader, says, "Many of these prisoners come from 
broken homes and broken relationships. They get caught in some bad choices 
and then their choices they make become their identity. My goal when I visit 
is to show them Christ's love and try to explain to them their identity in 
Christ." 

The President of the club, senior Maria Huyser, is grateful for the opportunity 
to serve in this ministry. She noted, "Serving in this capacity allows me to take 
a few hours each week to be intentional about investing in God's Kingdom." 



-Hannah Pargulski 







Heart for Missions, formally Known as Mission Support, has undergone 
major changes in this past school year. Co-leaders Taylor Polatas and Ennn 
Proehl decided that a name change, as well as some content change, would 
make a difference. Now the club not only provides mission support, but also 
gives opportunities to students and professors to talk about mission trips 
they have been on, as well as to pray about what is going on around the 
world. 

Taylor Polatas was amazed at how the changes had improved the group 
this year: "It's been really exciting for us to see this group come alive. We 
have really felt the Lord working," stated Taylor. The leaders have done a 
fantastic job at getting group members involved, but they are still looking 
to add more events to the club's agenda; perhaps a school-wide fast and fun 
activities like movie nights. 

-Allyson Vrabel 



1. Taylor Polatas and Ennn Proehl have 
really enjoyed getting to work to- 
gether to change the club and watch 
God work, (cb 2. Gabby Kirby and 
Lisa Boaz, and Rebecca Busier laugh 
at a funny moment in the meeting, 
(cb) 3. Brian Ginn and Katie Norman 
take time to share a snack and some 
stories with each other at a meeting, 
(cb) 4. The club has almost tripled in 
size this year, (cb) 



Spiritual Life 

151 





While many students are familiar with Olivet's internal drama 
groups like Green Room and Spoons for Forks, not as many know 
about the outbound drama ministry of Omega. 

Omega travels to churches in Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, and 
Wisconsin to perform for Sunday morning services and youth 
groups. For this first time this year, Omega had a preview night 
at Olivet. "We opened it for team members' friends and family to 
come and watch," explains director Amy Duerrwaechfer. "It was 
such a cool experience. It was something we have never done 
before, but having the support of campus like we did was just 
so neat!" 

Omega hosts auditions each fall for students interested in 
joining. While it requires a big chunk of time, the benefits are 
worth it, according to Duerrwaechfer. "I also love traveling and 
seeing how God can work in someone's life through something 
as simple as a skit," she said. 

-Sfaci Bradbury 



1, The group poses for a photo on one of their many trips, (s) 2. Cath- 
erine Henson and Cambria Thomas bonded through the hours spent 
together, (s) 3. An Omega group waits in a church for their time to 
perform, (s) 4. Omega requires a considerable time commitment, but 
its members have their share of laughs, (s) 5. Between performances 
students get a chance to relax and have some fun. (s) 6. Alysson Parker, 
Joy Fosnaugh, Ariella Martin, and Meredith Young enjoy each other's 
company on a trip, (s) 





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Calling on the power of God. speaking with the Creator of the Universe, conversing 
with Jesus on behalf of those on Olivet's campus, this is the mission of Prayer War- 
riors. Rain Down, a twenty-four hour prayer vigil, is one of the biggest events held 
by Prayer W/arriors. When asked about the biggest answer to prayer thus far, Sarah 
Di Monte, co-leader of the ministry, felt it was the raising of the on-campus prayer 
house. In the fall semester. Olivet approved the founding of a seven a.m. to nine a.m. 
prayer shift for one day out of the week. The leaders of the ministry, along with VP 
of Spiritual Life Jordan Bergren, want to someday make the time slot available for 
students to come and pray during any time of the day. 

The main point shown by those in this ministry is that prayer changes things in 
the world. It moves and shatters the mountains in our lives. It opens communication 
between us and the God who spoke us into being. It is alive and breathing, prayer is 
power. 




Jamila Coker pours out her heart in prayer, 
(cl) 2. Jordan Bergren intercedes on behalf of 
Olivet's campus, (cl) 3. During a time of prayer 
Grace Bowman sits in God's presence, (cl) 4. 
Caitie McCormack records her thoughts and 
prayers during a Prayer Warriors meeting, (c 
5. Sarah Di Monte offers up thanks to God. (c 



Spiritual Life 

153 



— " ■ " ' 








1. This worship bands leads PWJ as students gather to wor- 
ship, pray, and reflect, (ch) 2. Haley Hetfleisch worships with 
all her heart, (ch) 3. Joel Deckard praises God through his talent, 
(ch) 4. Joey Ramirez worships through his guitar and voice, 
(ch) 5. Rebecca Rodeheaver sings God's glory, (ch) 6. Joey 
Ramirez and Josh Gill hold nothing back as they praise God's 
name, (ch) 



Party with Jesus, fondly known as PWJ, is a benchmark Olivet min- 
istry. Party with Jesus is focused on students leading others towards 
growth in Christ. 

Through music, fellowship, and prayer, this venue invites students 
to open their hearts and lives to the presence of God. It beckons peo- 
ple to come and forget their worries of school, drama, and workload 
and just be at peace with Him. PWJ is the only student-led worship 
service on campus, meaning that every single week countless hours 
are spent by the student leaders, set-up crew, band members, and 
the speaker to prepare for the event. The effort put forth is for the 
glory of Christ. 

Co-leader Jim Murray shares, "It's blessed me in countless ways 
and continues to each week." Even the leadership is blessed by giving. 
This is a concept that fuels the whole purpose of PWJ: leading others 
toward Christ and His desire for their lives. This ministry is well known, 
well attended, and a blessing to many students on a weekly basis. 



-Kim Kratz 







Proclamation Gospel Choir is a Spiritual Life team com- 
prised of approximately 80 students who enjoy making 
worship enthusiastic and energetic. 

The choir is led by ONU graduate Jasper Taylor as 
(musical director. During each semester the choir does a 
concert on campus and also has the opportunity to travel 
[and sing in different areas of the Midwest. Choir member 
'Sophomore Shelby Allen expressed that, "Gospel Choir is 
an amazing opportunity to worship our God and also have 
a great time in fellowship!" 

Senior Christopher Tolbert is driven to serve as Presi- 
dent for an organization with such a positive purpose: "I 
'eally enjoy leading PGC." he said, "because it is a group 
that has the power to inspire and encourage through 
songs and through an avenue that no other group on 
campus can." 

Proclamation Gospel Choir members are certainly ex- 
cited about sharing the joy of Christ with others and it is 
?asy to join in their passion for praising the Lord. 

-Hannah Pargulski 



1. Gospel choir leads worship at Kankakee First Church of the Nazarene. (bb) 2. 
Jade Green and W/es Taylor clap their hands in rhythm, (bb) 3. Together with 
friends the Gospel Choir rejoices in the Lord, (bb) 4. Gospel Choir makes a joy- 
ful noise unto the Lord, (bb) 5. These students are excited about praising God. 
(bb) 6. These ladies radiate God's beauty as they sing with their choir, (bb) 




Spiritual Life 

155 




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Save Our Streets is a ministry on campus that helps to provide food and 
fellowship with the homeless. This ministry experience gives students the 
opportunity to do God's work by serving His people and providing them with 
the opportunity to hear God's word. 

Every Thursday Save Our Streets members meet at the Gift of God 
street church in Kankakee and have fellowship with the homeless that are 
there. They share a meal together while learning about each other's lives and 
then participate in a Bible study. Members of Save Our Streets also take their 
left over Nesbitt meals to Chicago on some Saturdays to pass them out to 
the homeless they fi nd on the streets. This year they ran a coat drive and 
donated the coats to Emmaus and the women's clothes were donated to 
Lamb's Fold. 

This ministry provides an excellent opportunity for Olivet students to 
reach out to the community and witness to the lost. Tracy Redman knows 
that this is where she is called to help out, "There are so many people who are 
suffering with no food and no shelter - I just want to reach out and do good 
whenever possible." 

-Allyson Vrabel 




1. A couple of men at the shelter partake in conversation 
while dinner is being prepared, (s) 2. Jordan Bond laughs 
at a joke that one of the men tells him. (s) 3. One of 
the men at the shelter shares how he is learning about 
the Ten Commandments, (s) 4. Pastor Ed who runs the 
homeless shelter feels blessed to have college students 
who want to make a difference working with him. (s) 5. 
Tracy Redman gets an oppertunity to share about Jesus 
during dinner, (s) 



Childre 






Taking time out of a busy schedule mid-week to hang out can be a chal- 
lenge: however the members of Urban Children's Ministry do much more than just 
relax. Each student is paired with a child from Kankakee County to meet with every 
Wednesday night for activities, a craft, and a snack. "Our ministry is targeted to- 
wards children from low-income families. We want to show them through our ac- 
tions that they are loved and cherished," co-leader Jennifer Reierson said. 

The group meets each Wednesday in the Warming House for an hour to 
host the kids. 'We have a very diverse group and wide age range, which is great 
for learning more about child behavior," explains co-leader Tayler St Aubin. "Also 
becoming a consistent part in their lives is great for them, but it's also a great way 
for us to put school on the backburner and have some fun." 

This year has seen the ministry grow in both the number of students and 
the number of children, and the benefl ts are mutual. "I love watching the kids get so 
excited once they see their "big buddy" when they arrive each Wednesday. It is truly 
so precious," St Aubin said. Reierson agreed, "I love being able to bless these kids as 
well as the moms who get an hour break each week." 

-Staci Bradbury 





1. Tayler St. Aubin acts as co-leader of 
the group, (bb) 2. Amanda Birth showers 
some love on one of the kids.(bb) 3. Sarah 
Toporek is able to form relationships with 
the kids by regularly being involved, (bb) 
4. Leaders organize crafts for the kids 
each week, (bb) 5. A high ratio of stu- 
dents to kids ensures that each child gets 
the attention they deserve, (bb) 



Spiritual Life 

157 



church 




The Education Department at Ol- 
ivet Nazarene University is the larg- 
est department on campus, boasting 
ot 513 education majors (as of Sep- 
tember 2010), 12 method professors 
who work strictly within the educa- 
tion department and 24 content pro- 
fessors who teach specialties such 
as math, English, and science from 
different departments on campus. 

Dr. James Upchurch, the Dean of the 
Education Department, is very proud 
of the students and the progression 
that the department as a whole is 
taking. Dr. Upchurch graduated with 
his B.S. from Olivet in 1971 and went 
on to earn an M.A. from St. Xavier Uni- 
versity in 1975, a CAS from Northern 
Illinois University in 1979, and an Ed.D. 
from Loyola University in 2000. He is 
in now starting his fifth year as Dean 
of School of Education and has thor- 
oughly enjoyed his time working 
with the faculty and students. Before 
accepting the position at Olivet Dr. 
Upchurch worked as a teacher and 
superintendent in public elementary 
schools for 35 years bringing his to- 
tal years in education to 42. He says, 
"It has been a wonderful journey." 

In 2001 Dr. Upchurch was asked to 
consider writing the School Leader- 
ship (school principalship) curriculum 
for the Grad School. The School Im- 
provement Leadership (SIL) Program 
was started in May 2002 with a fo- 
cus on servant leadership. Over 1,600 
candidates have completed their de- 
gree thus far. Dr. Upchurch was asked 
to consider applying for the position 
of Dean of the School of 



Education. Of his work over the past 
seven years Dr. Upchurch says, "it is 
a privilege and honor to work with 
future teaching candidates as they 
prepare to go in the fi eld of teach- 
ing." 

This year in particular, Dr. Upchurch 
has specif c cause to be proud of the 
School of Education. Every seven 
years the School of Education's vari- 
ous programs are evaluated by their 
National Education Programs. This 
school year eleven programs were 
nationally recognized out of the 
twelve. The evaluation consisted of 
the last three years of data/assess- 
ments of the candidates and their 
performance. This was only possible 
with the excellent faculty working 
with the candidates to reach exem- 
plary level of academic achievement," 
stated Upchurch. Dr. Upchurch views 
the Education Department as being 
"accountable to not only the can- 
didates but the programs must be 
rigorous and meet the national stan- 
dards of the profession. 

This success is evidence of the 
candidates' performance in the field/ 
clinical placements, student teach- 
ing performance, mission, faculty 
scholarship, diversity, financial sup- 
port from the university, and docu- 
mented "continuous improvement." 
Dr. Upchurch says, "We are blessed 
with faculty members who embrace 
the mission of Olivet, and practice 
the integration of faith and learning in 
the classrooms." 



The education department and 
its candidates embrace the scripture 
that is found on the wall in the School 
of Education offi ce: "Let my teaching 
fall like rain and my words descend 
like dew, like showers on new grass, 
like abundant rain on tender plants." 
(Deuteronomy 32:2) Dr. Upchurch 
sees these words as being very pow- 
erful in the shaping of future teachers 
and trusts that the instruction they 
receive will fall on fertile ground that 
is ready to soak it up. 

"Student teaching is the capstone 
of the education program for our 
candidates," states Dr. Upchurch. "Our 
candidates are given the opportunity 
to practice what they have prepared 
for and trained for. In the conceptual 
framework of the teacher education 
program: "Professionals Influencing 
Lives" is lived out daily by our can- 
didates with their eagerness to serve 
and impact the lives of children." Of 
the students in the program Dr. Up- 
church simply says, "They are the 
very BEST"! 

- Kayla Koury 



Academics 



161 



Art & Digital Media 




1. Stephanie Williams is intensely focused on her painting, care- 
ful to not have to redo it. (cl) 2. Ember Ward cuts out colored 
squares for a collage of magazine clippings, (cl) 3. Jamie Pickett 
listens to music while she puts focus on drawing a face, (cl) 4. 
Rachel Rhule works on creatively designing a bowl in pottery, (c 
5. Donte Payne works in photoshop at finishing a project, (c 




1. Clint Cabrera working on a psychology statistics problem, (cl) 2. A child de- 
velopment psychology class takes notes about children's athletic development 
in the preschool stage, (cl) 3. Dr. Kristian Veit gets his point across during a 
lecture, (cl) 4. Sociology students taking notes during a lecture in Wisner. (cl) 



mm 



School: 
Arts and Sciences 

Department Chair: 
Dr. Ray Bower 



Areas of Study: 
Psychology and Sociology 

Number of Majors: 
127 




■ 



Academics 



163 



Biological Scienc 





Areas of Study: 

Biology, Zoology, Science Education 

Environmental Science, 

Pre-Professional 

Number of Majors: 
165 





1. Libby Wilke works diligently in lab. (cl) 2. Paige Pat- 
terson carefully examines her cat for dissection, (cl) 3. 
Lindsey Ramirez adjusts the microscope to observe the 
specimen, (cl) 4. A student watches as Dr. Finkenbinder 
looks in the microscope to help locate the nucleus, (cl) 5. 
Justin Shonoman assists in cat dissections for lab. (cl) 








Areas of Study: 

Business Administration, Marketing, 

International Business, 

Accounting, 

Business Information Systems, 

Economics and Finance 

Number of Majors: 
268 



1. Despite the prevalence of Smarfboards. nothing can 
quite replace a traditional whiteboard for Dr. Glen Re- 
warts, (cl) 2. Jordan Hedge takes diligent notes during 
class, (cl) 3. Textbooks in class are the sure sign of a 
good time for Emily Hay. (cl) 4. Knsty Czyzniejewski 
uses her laptop to keep track of notes for classes, (cl) 
5. Business majors are required to dress up once a 
week, as demonstrated by Rachel Von Arb. (cl) 



Academics 



165 



mmmmmmmmmmmmmm 




1. Jocelyn Cook studiously takes notes in a class in the Communications Department, (cb) 2. Dr. Jay Martinson actively 
teaches his class, (cb) 3. Alex Swickard poses for his close-up as Andrew Oliver gets ready to shoot, (cb) 4. Jocelyn Cook, 
John Rachan, and Andrew Clark intensely focus on what their professor has to say. (cb) 5. Nora Durkln and Chelsea Hayes 
ready their camera for a shoot, (cb) 




Andrea Richardson and Ma- 
Temple complete their 
assignment, (cb) 2. Dr. Larry 
Vail teaches students about 
computer engineering, (cb) 
3. Scott Palmer reads about 
software systems, (cb) 4. 
Joe Schindel helps one of his 
classmates solve a computer 
glitch, (cb) 



Academics 

167 



Education 



Department Chair: 
Dr. James Upchurch 




Areas of Study: 

Early Childhood, Elementary, Physical/Health, Spanish, 

Family and Consumer Science, English, Math, Science, 

Social Science, Music 

Number of Majors: 
513 




1. Marjone Lonberger presents a class project using dice in her education class, (cb) 

2. Jade Green is paying attention to information that will help her in her future career 
as a teacher, (cb) 3. Betsy Pond uses cards to show an example of a number game 
in her education class, (cb) 4. Dr. Dale Oswalt interacts with his class during a lecture, 
(cb) 5. Knsten Kehl and Paul Reyes watch a group give a class presentation, (cb) 






1. Dr. Joseph Schroeder is one of the four 
professors who make up the engineering 
department, (cb) 2. John Rachan and Wes 
Sprague take a minute for a lighthearfed 
conversation, (cb) 3. Martin Pntchett com- 
pletes his assignment, (cb) 4. John Rachan 
and Ryan DeYoung have the same workload 
as any student, despite being in a smaller 
department, (cb) 



Academics 



169 



English & Modern Language 




School: 
Arts and Sciences 

Department Chair: 
Dr. Sue Williams 



Areas of Study: 

inglish, English Education, Spanish; Literature, 

Writing, French 

Number of Majors: 
113 





1. Lucas Madding practices the verbal rather written side of the English language, (cb) 2. Dr. Kashama Mulamba brings inter- 
national flavor to student's understanding of English, (cb) 3. "Developing an appreciation for literary works" is one of the key 
goals of the English department, as Nancy Patino can attest, (cb) 4. Professor Kristy Ingram guides her students through 
their College Writing 2 APA research papers, (cb) 



xercise bcience 







School: 
Professional Studies 

Department Chair: 
Dr. Scott Armstrong 

Areas of Study: 

Physical Education, 

Athletic Training, 

Sports Management, 

Recreation and Leisure Studies 



Number of Majors: 
210 




Students practice bracing injured football 
players and placing them on a stretcher, (cb) 
2. Alyssa Wilkms takes Michael Staley's blood 
pressure, (cb) 3. Seth Enckson gets his knee 
wrapped by Tori W/allm. (cb) 4. Dana Clausing 
practices bandaging a sprained wrist, (cb) 



Academics 



171 




School: 
Professional Studies 

Department Chair: 
Dr. Diane Richardson 

Areas of Study: 

Child Development, Dietetics, 

Family and Consumer Sciences, 

Family and Consumer Sciences Education, 

Fashion Merchandising, Housing 

and Environmental Design 

Number of Majors: 
150 






1. Anna Grieder, Madison Leeseberg, and Kendra 
W/ikoff compare notes, (cl) 2. Austin Johnson 
actively listens during a lecture, (cl) 3. Madison 
Leeseberg scans the material, (cl) 4. Corey Brin- 
son demonstrates his Knowledge for the class, 
(cl) 




Angela Williams intently listens during a lecture, (cb) 2. Professor David 
Claborn listens as the students give presentations on the Enlightenment, 
(kb) 3. Jesse Mezera, Autumn Albring and Adnen Beniot pay astute atten- 
tion in class, (cb) 4. During western civilization students diligently take 
notes over a group presentation, (kb) 



Academics 



173 



■" — ~~~- — ■ — "-~ 



ematics 



■Hn 




1. Professor Enzinger strikes a pose with her enthusiasm for math, (ch) 2. The class focuses while Professor Enzinger gives 
her lesson for the day. (ch) 3. Students diligently take notes for an upcoming exam, (ch) 4. Nichole Rhodes and Kathryn 
Frius look at the board to make sure they did the problem correctly, (ch) 5. Calculus students pay close attention to the 
examples given by their professor, (ch) 



USIC 





Department Chair: 
Dr. Donald ReddicK 



Areas of study: 

Music, Music Education, Composition, Music 

Performance, Church Music 

Number of majors: 102 




1. Music Education is a difficult major to finish in four years, as 
these music students are sure to attest to. (bb) 2. Melody Abbott 
learns under Dr. Nelson, one of the fi rst professors to play the new 
organ, (bb) 3. Zachary Kohlmeier sits in Larsen, catching up on 
studying before class, (bb) 4. Kaleb Soller attentively listens, (bb) 
5. In order to someday be a music composer, Ben Cherney must 
first be a student, (bb) 



Academics 



175 






School: 
Professional Studies 

Department Chair: 
Dr. Susan Draine 

Areas of Study: Nursing 



umber of majors: 308 





1. Aimee Tarr's son Noah gives Dr. Susan Drain a bit of help giving his 
mother her pin. (ts) 2. Kaitlin Bailey and Adrienne Kelly learn the practical 
side of their craft, (cb) 3. Holly Pflederer, Sarah Di Monte and Julie Wittmer 
practice nursing in Wisner Hall, surrounded by the faces of past nurses 
which decorate the walls, (cb) 4. Heidi Richardson and Leeanna Neeley 
work together, (cb) 5. Reagan Drebenstedt is all smiles as he is pinned by 
Dr. Draine during the pinning ceremoney in December, (fs) 



Physical Science 



1. Aimme Fish perfects her fi nal product. (Kb) 

2. Rachel Weber tests out her floating meth- 
od. (Kb) 3. Margaret O'Neill and Matt Gargi- 
ulo show off their handiwork. (Kb) 4. Chyna 
SparKs places nails in her boat (Kb) 5. Meghan 
Pipal and Katnna Holm are in awe of their foil 
art. (Kb) 

School: 
Arts and Sciences 



Department Chair: 
Dr. Max Reams 

Areas of Study: 

Geological Science, 

Geological Engineering, 

Chemistry, Biochemistry, 

Forensics, Geography, 

Physical Science, Science 

Education, Environmental 

Science 

Number of majors: 54 







■« | i/ 



Academics 



177 






1. Natilee Bertolozzi shares a laugh with fellow classmates during 
class, (bb) 2. Martha Harrouff asks for help from Dr. Bower with a 
statistics problem, (bb) 3. Lon and a classmate demonstrate team 
work, a valuable skill in their major, (bb) 4. Katie Schultz concen- 
trates on her test, (bb) 5. Brent Brooks and Heather Eby study 
their notes, (bb) 6. Lisa Kurtz asks a question about a handout 
received in class, (bb) 



School: 
Professional Studies, 

Department Chair: 
Dr. Houston Thompson 

Areas of study: Social Work, 
Criminal Justice 

Number of majors: 190 



eoiogy 




1. Eager hands of religion majors are raised during a 
class discussion, (bb) 2. Professor Dodd sits back 
fo listen to the students' presentations, (bb) 3. Cara 
Sunberg uses her laptop to transcribe class, (bb) 4. 
Jordan Gerstenberger and his group partner give a 
presentation, (bb) 5. Students listen and process the 
content they are absorbing, (bb) 6. Audrey Penrod 
uses the Bible to back up her argument, (bb) 



School: 
Theology and Christian Ministry 

Department Chair: Dr. Carl Leth 

Areas of Study: 

Theology and Philosophy, 

Biblical Literature, Christian Ministry, 

Christian Education 

Number of majors: 200 




Academics 



179 








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Studying abroad, whether in 
Japan or Los Angeles is a com- 
pletely wonderful challenging 
and eye-opening experience. 
Students learn lessons they never 
Knew they would need to Know, 
including finding grocery stores 
in completely foreign countries 
at 10 o'clocK at night, or how 
to use the public transportation 
to be at a lecture or class in 20 
minutes. Lessons like these, and 
so many more, are some of the 
most valuable pieces of infor- 
mation that students may take 
away from their college experi- 
ence. College is about learning to 



live, and study abroad is a very 
effective teaching tool. Here are 
two personal accounts of study 
abroad experiences: 

"Biology is the study of life, and 
in Costa Rica we didn't just study 
life - we experienced it." 

- Kate Krause 

"If I had a day and a half to ex- 
plain, I don't think I could properly 
convey everything that God has 
done in me while being at Ox- 
ford. All I can say is that I came 
into Oxford with expectations 
for God to do something amaz- 



ing, and He more than delivered." 
- Tim Stephansen 

For many, study abroad is one 
of the most defi ning semesters, 
or years, of their college careers. 
We are happy to experience a bit 
of these travels with them. 

- Kayla Koury 




1. Melanie Loulousis and Blaine Manning trek through the hills 
of Costa Rica, (s) 2. Tim Stephansen explores some ruins with 
some new Oxford friends, (ts) 3. Jenna Dickey enjoys her time 
in Quito Ecuador, (s) 4. Four Olivet study abroad students get 
in some flying time while in Costa Rica over the summer, (s) 
5. Students spend time on the beach in Costa Rica, (s) 6. An 
Olivet student, Kelsey Nelson, spends time with kids during 
a semester in Ecuador, (s) 7. During her junior year abroad. 
Jessica Schewe spends time with new friends in Japan, (s) 8. 
Tim Stephansen standing on a wall in the gardens at Hampton 
Court, outside of Central London, (ts) 9. Jessica Schewe grace- 
fully models traditional Japanese dress, (s) 10. Tim Stephansen 
enjoys some time in front of Salisbury Cathedral while study- 
,n 8 ,n Oxford. En g ,and,ts, Academ i C S 



181 



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The phrase "Support the Waddle" has been heard echoing off the 

walls of Ludwig and across the quad, as well as seen sported on spiffy, black 

t-shirfs worn by many Olivet students. This, now well-known idiom is representative of 

the Ultimate Frisbee team, the Black Penguins. After one Black Penguin practice on a cool, fall, 

Wednesday afternoon, the Aurora yearbook sat down with four members of the team: seniors Wes Siscoe, 

John Ouandt, Adam Schick and junior Ryan Logan, to talk about what drives them. 

AA: Do you feel that, as a team, you are driven? 

WS: Yes- We are driven. 

AS: (with a smile) At least most of us. 

AA: How many members are on the team this year? 

JO: 22 people. 

WS: Last year we had 16. 

AS: We actually have 23 this year, with hopefully more second semester. 

AA: How did this all get started? 

RL: My older brother started a Frisbee team at his school, so after going to some of his tournaments, I emailed 

some guys here. In the fall of 2009, we got a team together and started practicing and going to tournaments. 

WS: The team came out of intramurals. We wanted more competition, more playing time... 

AS: So we had fryouts... everyone who tried out was invited to play. 

AA: What is the draw of Ultimate Frisbee? 

AS: Frisbee is a self-officiated sport- no referees- only observers. It's about the spirit of the game. 

WS: Sometimes we want to get really upset at the other team but it's important to keep a clear head. It's easy to 

get mad, it's hard to actually talk it out. 

AA: So what has being on the team taught you? 

AS: I learned how to throw a Frisbee. And I learned there is a lot of raw athleticism on the team in general. Mainly JO. 

JO: Thanks Schick. 

WS: We are going to try to win nationals this year. 



AA: Why do you do it? 

RL: We do it cause it's fun. 

WS: We love Frisbee. 

AS: We do if because of the same reason any other athlete does a sport. 

WS: Plus, I missed the comradery I had with my sports teams in high school. It's good to get done with classes at 

the end of the day and go hang out with these guys. 

JO: Same for me... the team has become kind of a brotherhood. You hang out with these same 20 guys all the time 



It's about fun and a sport we all thoroughly enjoy as a team. 



Clubs & 
Organizations 

185 






1. The 2010-2011 Associated Student Council, (ch) 

2. ASC Executives: Jerry Scheller, Sarah Zelhart, 
Kyle Lowry, Kayla Rolling, Evan Karg, Alex Rip- 
berger, Grace Mantanan, Jordan Bergren, Jessica 
Cohea and Shane Emaus. (ch) 3. Some ot the nearly 
300 TOMS shoes sold, (bb) 4. Student Body Pres- 
ident Evan Karg leads ASC during a voting council 
meeting, (ch) 5. Joe Schindel works a game booth 
at the Block Party; (mr) 



5. Members work diligently during a meeting, (ch) 6. Kristin Thompson enjoys what she 
does, (ch) 7. Alex Ripberger walks around campus, (mr) 8. Adam Schick and Wes Siscoe have a 
good time at the meeting, (ch) 9. Jordan Bergren takes a break from work, (mr) 10. Bryan Stevens 
and Clarissa Cox catch up. (ch) 11. Grace Mantanan and Hannah June voice their opinion, (ch). 12. 
Lance Hays and Kyle Lowry chill at a meeting, (ch) 




The Associated Student Council (ASC) is a group of student leaders driven to enrich each student's experience at Olivet. 

One new ASC event this year was the TOMS Shoes Jamboree. At the end of "One Day Without Shoes," ASC hosted a TOMS 
Shoes-painting party. Live bands performed as students decorated canvas shoes. Sophomore McKenzie Fntch was one of 
nearly 300 students who purchased TOMS shoes: "I liked seeing our school get involved with such an awesome company." 
she said. 

Events like this are the result of the contribution of each council member. As Senior Evan Karg, Student Body President, 
stated, "If is an honor to be able to serve and represent the student body. The events, services^ and initiatives that ASC or- 
ganizes and promotes would not be possible without the support of each officer. I am thankful for the ONU community and 
the opportunities that ASC provides for people to come together." 



-Hannah Pargulski 



r 



Clubs & 
Organizations 

187 




This year's events put on by the ASC 
class councils have included everything 
from Ollie's Follies Variety Show to Candy 
Costume Fest to the TOMS shoes event 
to the Winter Banquet. These events 
have helped the students to get to Know 
people in other classes as well as provide 
fun weekend activities. The class councils 
have also thrown class specific events 
like the sophomores' birthday party and 
the seniors' Tobies award show. Fresh- 
man class President Ryan Page enjoys the 
unity the events bring: "My favorite part is 
getting to know the upperclassmen that 
most of the time freshmen wouldn't get 
a chance to meet, and just getting to 
know the freshmen class and grow close 
to them." 

Class councils work hard to make sure 
the students are happy and have activi- 
ties on the weekends to enjoy and grow 
closer to others in the student body. 

-Allyson Vrabel 




1. Senior class council: Chaplain Wes Siscoe, Erin Salzman, Kayla Koury, 
President Shannon Battershell. Libby Devine, Lance Hays and Adam 
Schick, (ch) 2. Junior class council: Bryan Stevens, Sarah Sinn, President 
Mitch Johnson, Karyn Nichols, Kristin Thompson, Angela Rivas and Chap- 
lain Morgan McPherson. (ch) 



m 





3. Mitch Johnson is excited to be working the Back- 
to-School Block Party, (mr) 4. Bre Bambrick talks with 
friends at an ASC meeting, (ts) 5. Adam Schick helps 
some freshmen move in. (ts) 6. Jeremy Height carries a 
heavy crate into Chapman Hall, (ch) 7. Brandon Klemm 
oarticipates at the class meeting, (mr) 8. Joe Schindel 
is focused on move-in day. (ts) 9. Kristin Thomp- 
son is excited about being back on campus for class 
council, (mr) 10. Freshmen class council: Bre Bambrick. 
Madison Leeseberg. Brandon Klemm. President Ryan 
Page, Ross Johnson. Anna Gneder and Chaplain Han- 
nah Rowen. (ch). 11. Sophomore class council: Presi- 
dent Jameson Forshee, Joe Schindel. Jeremey Height. 
Erinn Proehl, Hannah June, Chaplain Chad Evans and 
Clarissa Cox. (ch) 



Clubs & 
Organizations 

189 




Fellowship of Christian Athletes meets twice 
a month to pray together in a small group set- 
ting with others who share the same love for 
God. FCA is not just for athletes; they invite 
anyone with a passion for God to participate. 

Throughout the school year they put on 
several events for group members to be able 
to hang out. talk about sports, and enjoy time 
together. Events such as a Halloween bonfi re, 
Christmas party, coaches' appreciation break- 
fast, and a Superbowl party help bring the 
group closer and allow them to have fun to- 
gether while honoring God. To spread God's 
word in the local community they teamed up 
with S.O.S to serve the homeless at a Christ- 
mas party. They also keep active on campus 
by leading a devotional for the volleyball team 
before matches. 

Being involved in FCA to Cassie Brainard 
means a chance to be a leader in the spiritual 
community: "As a leader, FCA is such a great 
opportunity to minister my passion for God to 
the campus and community." 

-Allyson Vrabel 






1. Freshman girls enjoy each others company over Uno at the Halloween Party, (cb) 2. 
The bonfi re offered warmth and fellowship for FCA members, (cb) 3. Adam Schick, 
Erin Salzman, and John Quandt gather ingredients for s'mores. (cb) 4. FCA members 
cooked an appreciation breakfast for the coaches, (cb) 5. Basketball player Simone 
Coburn takes a break to play Madden, (cb) 6. Danielle Pipal is a junior basketball player, 
(cb) 7. The leadership team, made up of Jeff Hawkins, Erin Salzman, Joel Kline, Rachel 
Kearney, Cassie Brainard, and Coach Ladner, organize events and lead meetings for 
FCA. (cb) 




Evidence of the team's greatness show up around campus to 
promote events, (mr) 2. Jerry Scheller discusses a new adver- 
sitsing idea, (mr) 3. Nick Klomstad helps promote ASC. (mr) 4. Sa- 
mantha Allen and Nancy Patmo let their creative juices flow, (mr) 

5. Publicity council enjoys promoting events around campus, (mr) 

6. Matt Groves Knows his pen is mightier than a sword, (mr) 




Functional art. That's what the Publicity Council strives to create. 
"We serve as an advertisement agency for student events," explains 
Vice President of Publicity Jerry Scheller. Working closely with the 
ASC, a team of 10 graphic designers and four marketing specialists 
work to create advertisements. Scheller said. "We want to, and have 
succeeded in, thinking of new ways to tell the students about events. 
I love receiving the poster designs and seeing how impressive my 
council is with their graphic design ability," 

Working on the council allows creative students a chance to show- 
case their talent to the campus while also promoting ASC. 

-Staci Bradbury 



Hi 




Clubs & 
Organizations 

191 



Men's Residential 




MRL is the organization in charge of support- 
ing the men here at ONU. MRL is supervised by 
the vice president Alex Ripberger and a social 
committee made up of other college men. 

MRL has put on various exciting events 
for the men here on campus, including a Men's 
Weekend, Poker Night (held at the Warming 
House) and TCW, All of the events are geared 
toward involving the men here on campus and 
of course, that means all the happenings include 
manly activities. This semester's Poker Night 
contained a plethora of activities to make the 
boys drool, including, that's right, POKERI Mark 
Stonitsch, who came to ONU this year as a ju- 
nior, was drawn to the event due to his love 
for poker and he was not disappointed. "The 
poker was fun and I definitely felt like by the 
end of the night, I knew a couple of new faces." 
Mark commented, as he reminisced. "It was the 
fl rst event I'd ever been to for MRL, but I would 
definitely go to another one." Events like this 
encourage Alex Ripberger and he says, "I'm 
hoping that we are building a base for MRL in 
years to come that will really try to push the 
boundaries of what we've done in years past. 
I want the men at Olivet to feel like they can 
embrace being a man without giving up mor- 
als." 

-Kim Kratz 




1. Jacob Naldi. Cole Jensen, David Parker, Robert Mitchell, VP of MRL Alex Rip- 
berger and Kevin Greene are part of this fun loving MRL council, (cl) 2. Ian 
Matthews and Kyle Lowry have a great time at cards night, (cl) 3. Jonathan 
Huizenga runs to make his next shot in paintball. (cl) 4. Sebastian Esquetini aims 
for the perfect shot, (cl) 




Women's Residential Life (W/RL) is team of dedicated, godly women leaders chosen to sponsor events, provide 
support, and create uplifting fellowship for the women at Olivet. Sophomore Alison Monkemeyer says. "It is a nice way 
to give back to girls on campus" she said. Junior Kayla Rolling, VP of W/RL, is passionate about helping women discover 
their significance in Christ. She stated, "I want the events that W/RL puts on for the women to be centered around a 
theme that encourages them to look for beauty within their souls." Two W/RL-sponsored events that followed this 
theme were the Coronation and the Sister 2 Sister Thanksgiving Pasta dinner. These events, as well as other events 
sponsored by W/RL, encourage the constant fostering of Christ-like community. 



-Hannah Pargulski 



Clubs & 
Organizations 

193 




The theme of a yearbook acts as the glue that 
creates a cohesive feel throughout all the pages. 
Executive Designer Alyssa Cramer tackled the cre- 
ation of the visual side of the Aurora. 

"Driven was chosen as the theme because it 
encompasses the mindset of our campus. As stu- 
dents we are driven to excellence not only in our 
area of study Put also in our spiritual lives." she 
said. The design for this book is "simple and clean", 
according to Cramer, and creates a magazine style 
within its pages. 

A senior graphic design major, Cramer decided 
to apply for the position of Executive Designer 
in order to gain experience and knowledge that 
would benefi t her after graduation. Her responsibil- 
ities include designing the cover, the divider pages 
between sections, and specific page layouts. 

The cover of the book started out as just a 
sketched, abstract image of a road. "Driven made 
me think of having a destination and to get some- 
where you need a map." Cramer explained. "So I 
meshed the two things and incorporated the ab- 
stract road with the map and pulled the books col- 
ors out of the map. If was about a month's process 
to get the fi nal image for the cover." 

-Staci Bradbury 




1. Working on the yearbook staff provides students with an opportunity to 
practice graphic design, photography, and writing skills that they've learned 
in class, (cl) 2. As Executive Editor, Sarah Zelharf selects four people for Exec- 
utive positions in writing, design, photography, and business, (cl) 3. Photog- 
raphers Brent Brooks and Morgan Radzimanowski provide comic relief during 
a weekly meeting, (cl) 4. InDesign pros Emily Hay and Amanda Mazzaro place 
pictures and text onto each page, (cl) 




Stories have a complete lifespan. First conceptualized and evaluated by Section Edi- 
tors, potential stories are born when an Editor assigns a writer to begin reporting and writing. 
According to Executive Editor Jessica Cohea. the story runs a rigorous gauntlet before pub- 
lication. The Editors edit the stories fi rst, then send them to me and the Copy Editor, Brian 
Kosek. for a final edit. Then, once all corrections are made and any additions are put in, the 
story is put into an InDesign page and finally printed," Cohea said. Each edition of the Glim- 
merGlass receives as much tender loving care as a growing child. "We spend so many hours 
trying to perfect the paper, and it is always exciting when someone picks it up and reads it," 
Cohea relates. The most difficult part about working for a student newspaper is finding time 
to finish everything, but we always manage to push through and make every deadline." The 
passion with which the staff molds the paper stems from both passion and necessity. "You 
need to show dedication and love for the GlimmerGlass," Cohea explains. "Journalism is a time 
consuming hobby or career. It is a very rewarding feeling to know that people are reading your 
stories, and looking at what myself and the staff work so hard on." 

-Staci Bradbury 





1. Rachel Kearney checks over a copy of the Glimmer- 
Glass during the editing process, (cl) 2. Each edition of 
the GlimmerGlass requires attention to writing, photog- 
raphy, and layout, (cl) 3. Jessica Cohea, a senior Jour- 
nalism major, took on the role of Executive Editor, (cl) 
4. Aly Gibson works in the shared GlimmerGlass/Aurora 
office in the basement of Ludwig. (cl) 



Clubs & 
Organizations 

195 





ITika Anderson enjoys spending some 
free time catching up with some friends, 
s) 2. Nesbitt RA's bond with Resident 
Director Lincoln Butler on move in day. 
(ch) 3. Amy Dillman looks through her 
freshman resident's paperwork, (mr) 4. 
Olde Oak RA's, Jack Chnstensen, Kev- 
in Greene, Jerry Scheller and Cameron 
Dunlop get some hangout time during 
the RA retreat at Camp Camby in In- 
dianapolis, (s). 5. Resident Director Joy 
Guffey helps out at William's lobby on 
move in day. (cb) 




The Residential Life staff is willing to go above and beyond their al- 
ready crazy lives to make sure that the rest of us are taken care of and 
enjoy our college experience. Sophomore RA Jimmy Phillips says, "I am 
there if anybody needs a friend or just a dude to talk to. Listening and 
loving are two massive components of being an RA". Jacquelyn Ford tries 
to encourage her floor as often as possible, "I love to love on my gals and 
make sure they know that they are loved. I also started a thing called "se- 
cret sister" that pairs the girls on my floor together so that they can pray 
for and encourage each other as well." We are lucky to have the RA's and 
to know that someone cares for us. 



6. Williams RA's with Resident Director 
Joy Guffey spend time together at re- 
treat bonding and discussing their vision 
for Williams Hall this year, (s) 7. The Oaks 
RA's gets some quality time in with their 
Resident Director Donna McAllister, (s) 8. 
Olde Oak RA, Jerry Schller moves fresh- 
men boys into Nesbitf (ch) 9. Parrott RA's 
Hannah Escalante and Bethany Mendith 
are ready to go to RA retreat for a some 
relaxfion and bonding time, (cb) 



-Allyson Vrabel 



Clubs & 
Organizations 



197 



Biophilic 




Biophilic is an organization aimed towards educating biol- 
ogy majors about the career of their choosing, in addition to 
encouraging community during monthly meetings. Senior Paul 
Beaty enthusiastically noted about the club. "I love how fellow 
biology majors and our professors can come together outside 
of class to get to know one another and have a little fun before 
going back to the books." 

One aspect of the club that promotes fellowship is the Pre- 
Healfh Mentor Program, where upperclassmen hold seminars on 
different professional schools to which they are applying so 
that underclassmen will have a mentor. Members of Biophilic 
serve not only the Olivet biology department, but their passion 
for science also inspires community service projects, such as 
the Kankakee River Cleanup. 

Senior Kevin Greene, President of Biophilic, stated, "The un- 
derclassmen and my friends motivate me to lead the club be- 
cause my goal has always been to help steer them in the right 
direction." 

-Hannah Pargulski 




1. Biophilic members enjoy a day at Perry Farm, (s) 2. Biophilic 
takes time to help out in the community and show appreciation, 
(s) 3. Group members make biology projects fun and work to- 
gether, (s) 4. Paul Beaty and Professor Greg Long dress up to be 
silly and lighten the mood. W/ho says science has to be dull? 



Capitol Hill Gang is an organization that enables political science majors 
and minors to develop a passion for seeking justice in the world and to 
promote political activity on campus. 

One of the club's most well-attended events is the annual Fall Debate. 
This year. Dr. Bowling served as moderator while two teams answered 
questions centered on religious expression and freedom in modern Ameri- 
can society. 

Junior Ryan Dykhouse, Events Committee Chair, stated that what drives 
him to debate is "the ability to expand public knowledge and open up both 
sides, to expand ipeoples'l knowledge above what they would normally 
get on a daily basis." 

Members of Capitol Hill Gang are also devoted to serving the community, 
such as volunteering at Center of Hope, which provides food and financial 
assistance to families in need. President Brett Carmouche stated, "We re- 
main excited and committed to our desires to make not only Olivet, but 
our community in general, a more loving and compassionate place." 

-Hannah Pargulski 



1. The group answers questions about religious 
expression and freedom in today's society, (bb) 

2. Autumn Kiess takes notes and listens to formu- 
late better opinions, (bb) 3. Jackie Travnik answers 
questions about her religious views, (bb) 4. Matt 
Van Dyke feels confi dent in his ability to articulate 
his views correctly, (bb) 5. Dr. Bowling serves as 
a moderator as he asks the two teams questions. 
(bb) 6. Howie Van Dyke is a guest in the debate 
and helped to lighten the mood by getting people 
to laugh, (bb) 7. Ryan Hayes and Professor Brian 
Woodworth listen intensely, pondering what they 
are going to express next, (bb) 




Clubs & 
Organizations 

199 







Chemistry Club "exists to be a fun and supple- 
mental academic environment for those who enjoy 
chemistry," stated club President Michael Doherty. 

Although the club is rather small, they are trying to 
bond with other clubs, such as Biophilic, in hopes to 
make the club more appealing to attract new mem- 
bers. One of the ways they are trying to do this is by 
holding more parties such as their "Fall Meet and Greet," 
where they make caramel apples with hot plates and 
beakers. Chemistry Club is also hoping to start a 
chapter of the American Chemical Society, a two year 
process that will be helpful for Chemistry majors on 
their applications for graduate schools. This process 
is helpful because it makes the club more worthwhile 
for its members and if will bring more people into their 
community and provide more abilities for leadership. 

The club also fries to build unity within the club by 
attending meetings and going to get ice cream once 
a semester with the clubs sponsor. Dr. Larry Ferren. 
They have a lot of fun while doing what they love to 
do. which is a great experience overall. 



-Allyson Vrabel 




1. Chemistry club members enjoy being together and sharing their 
love of chemistry, (s) 2. Emily Waskow makes sure her lab is correct, 
(ch) 3. Elizabeth White checks the temperature of the solution, (ch) 
4. Marcus Powers accuartely measures the chemicals, (ch) 5. Michael 
Doherty and Emily Waskow work together to finish their project, 
(ch) 6. Michael Doherty serves as the President of chemistry club, 
(ch) 7. Michael Doherty, Emily Waskow, Marcus Powers and Elizabeth 
White dip their eye droppers into the chemicals, (ch) 



ub Volleyball 



The Olivet Men's Club Volleyball team gives students a chance to 
participate in the sport they enjoy and compete against other schools on 
a national level. The team consists ot thirteen students who share a passion 
tor the game of volleyball. They are all fairly young, but they don't let that 
stand in their way. The players get along well and are great at encouraging 
one another during practices and games. Team captain Philip Merki was very 
excited for this year's tournament. "I am very optimistic and feel as though 
we are all in good shape and that we will have a great season." 

Club volleyball is a good experience for all those on the team be- 
cause they get the chance to travel, get involved in a sport they love, and 
play against some of the best teams in the nation. 

-Allyson Vrabel 





1. Matt Smith puts up a solid block, (mr) 2. The 2010-2011 men's club volleyball team, (mr) 3. Brad Reed 

puts his best effort into improving his game during practice, (mr) 4. Phil Merki works on perfecting his UUDS & 

attack, (mr) 5. Christopher Ingersol sets the ball for a teammate, (mr) 6. Carl Nutter spikes it over the q : j.: „ _ 

net with all his might, (mr) 7. Colton Smith slams the ball down for a kill, (mr) o 







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Computer Club is not meant only for those major- 
ing in a computer associated degree but for all stu- 
dents with a passion for technology and exploring 
the interconnections of a hard drive. 

Meeting every two weeks, the club's meeting spot 
is in the computer lab, but on special occasions the 
group enjoys a good time at the Gold Bowl Chinese 
Buffet in Kankakee. Everyone in the club not only has 
a mind for computers, but a strong desire for serving 
as well. Their motto is "Minds for computing, hearts 
for serving." The group members work on building 
fellowship with each other and planning events that 
will benefit everyone on campus. For Christmas, the 
club comes together to watch old computer movies 
and eat a "smorgasbord of cookies provided by Dr. 
Bariess," stated club President Matthew Wallace. 

These intelligent souls are out to discover all the 
hidden secrets of technology today and in the fu- 
ture, but they are also ready to invent and rewire 
friendships with each other. Matthew Wallace says 
"Computers are not only a hobby, but a way of life." 

-Kim Kratz 



1. Edson Solares, John Peterson, Stephen Farr, Nick 
Dickrell and Bruce Cheek get started on their 
project, (s) 2. Ben Fifi-eld leads a club meeting, 
(s) 3. Members of computer club are passionate 
about computers and technology, (s) 




nmina Justice 




Criminal Justice club seeks to promote "one for all and all for one." This like-minded purpose is what drives the members of 
this club to come together and utilize their similar interests and talents. 

Club President Derek Liechfy has been President for one semester, but he has been active in the club since he started here 
at Olivet. Many of the people are criminal justice majors or minors, but some of them just have a heart for justice. "Many of our 
members have hobbies that include traveling, and politics," Derek explained. "Most of our events fall under these categories, so 
those are the people we attract." The club has recently started a spring term trip to Washington DC. Partnering with other clubs, 
the trip consists of visits to national monuments, historical locations, and a trip to an actual courtroom of a Federal Judge. "It was 
a success last year and many people have signed up to either return or go for the first time on this year's trip." stated Liechfy. 

Both Derek and faculty advisor. Professor Brian Woodworth. have high hopes for this next year. "We want people to come to 
events and be active in the club, not just receive random e-mails promoting t-shirts," Derek states. This year the club has revived 
itself and many new students have answered the call for justice and plan to lead into next year. 

-Kim Kratz 





1. Criminal Justice club members investigate a 
mock crime scene, (s) 2. Andrew Wahler takes 
down the measurements of a "murder" victim, 
(s) 3. Criminal Justice club teams up with Wom- 
en's Residential Life to teach a women's self- 
defense class in the turf room, (mr) 4. Adam 
Sfeveley teaches Kayla Rolling how to defend 
herself against an attacker, (mr) 



Clubs & 
Organizations 

203 



MMMMHnHH 



■■■■^^■H 



■■■■■■■MaH 





For students who want to make an impact, Diakonia, 
the social work club, is the place to be. President Zach 
Baker said. "The best part is being able to fellowship 
while serving the community for the greater good." 
Treasurer Jana Pierce agrees: "I love learning about the 
Lord through interactions with others." 

Events they sponsored this year included a Get to 
Know You party, Trick-or-Treat-for -Necessities 
throughout the community, and a collection of pres- 
ents for foster children and Christmas party. "My fa- 
vorite part is the One Hope United Christmas Party 
we throw for the foster children," Kayla Button said. 
"I love meeting them and hanging out with them and 
their families." 

Students get to know families well over their years 
of involvement. "My highlight was being at the Christ- 
mas party," Button said. "I was holding a baby, and his 
mom came up and asked me if I was here last year. I 
responded yes, and she fold me I held her other son all 
night and that this was his brother!" 

- Staci Bradbury 



1. Diakonia fakes a break from their social work duties 
and poses for a group picture, (bb) 2. Jessica Voss cuts 
out a greeting card for a local nursing home, (bb) 3. 
President Zach Baker works on his computer during a 
club meeting, (bb) 4. Kenzie Edwards works on a thank 
you card, (bb) 




reen Ro 




Green Room is Olivet's theatre club, which runs the Fall Play to the Spring 
Musical, to 24 hour Theatre and Broadway Revue. 

The community is the best part of Green Room and theatre," member Ron 
Gamache said, "Coming together and creating the best show imaginable drives 
us to keep coming back every time." 

President Kristine Sokarda enjoys the joy that theatre brings to its audience. 
"At every event, it is like we become this big family that supports and laughs and 
loves one another, I have to say it is wonderful!" 

- Staci Bradbury 



1. The Green Room gathers for a 
group picture after 24 Hour Theatre, 
(bb) 2. Jenny Ward, pretending to 
be Snow White, grabs Zarah Miller's 
face, (bb) 3. Nothing like a serenade 
and some Starbucksl (bb) 4. Brad 
Palmer eats a delicious roll as he tries 
to remember a line, (bb) 




Clubs & 
Organizations 

205 



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Vikings, cowboys and time travelers proved no match 
against modern man Michael Doherty, the winner of this 
year's Mr. ONU: Men Through the Ages. 

"I feel pretty special to have been chosen by the judges 
and by the students of Olivet to be this year's Mr. ONU," 
Doherty, a sophomore, stated. He portrayed a man from 
the current time period as a Zumba instructor and YouTube 
sensation. He delighted the crowd with "Doherty's Dumba" 
his hip-shaking Zumba choreography that featured black 
lights to accentuate the bright clothing of Doherty and his 
"Dumba" students. For "DohertyTube" he remade six popular 
videos from YouTube, including "Charlie Bit Me" and "Da- 
vid After the Dentist." "I just picked my favorite videos and 
ones that I knew a of people had been talking about," Do- 
herty said. 

Doherty said he did not even want to take part in the 
event, but Vice President of WRL Kayla Rolling convinced 
him it would worth it. "Ultimately, I think not caring about 
winning allowed me to relax, have fun and strut my stuff," he 
said. "He was himself and he showed his character through 
all he did." said sophomore Whitney Swick. "I left feeling like 
I knew him better." 

Doherty had the task of pulling a sword from a stone be- 
fore officially being named the winner of Mr. ONU. His name 
will be engraved on the sword, which according to Kayla 
Rolling, will be displayed somewhere on campus. 

-Meagan Ramsay 

This story first appeared in the 
GlimmerGlass, Vol. 70. No. 7 

The contestants of Mr. ONU show what it means to be a real man. 
(bb) 2. Seth Lowery finds somebody to love, (bb) 3. Being able fc 
pull the sword from the stone is the mark of a true man. (bb) 4. Joe 
Schindel shows his patriotism during the best in shorts competition, 
(bb) 5. Matt Krajec offers biblical humor for his talent, (bb) 6. Bryan 
Stevens, portraying men from the future, break dances in his light-up 
suit, (bb) 





7. John Ouandt flexes his muscles as an ancient Greek, (bb) 8. Primitive man Seth Lowery learns to make 
fire, (bb) 9. Former Mr. ONU winners Spencer Cook and Kyle Lowry, act as hosts for the evening, (bb) 
10. Viking Ben Geeding sings any song the audience requests, while playing the keyboard for his tal- 
ent, (bb) 11. Michael Doherty pulls the sword from the stone and is knighted Mr. ONU. (bb) 12. Cowboy 
Travis Powers cooks up his version of a western omelet, which included: coffee, an egg, baked beans, 
tabasco sauce and cat food, (bb) 13. Michael Doherty and his "Dumba" dancers "Dumba" their hearts out. 
(bb) 



Clubs & 
Organizations 

207 



|HBM^^^^^BBBBBB|^H|j|^^M|M||MM^Ha[jjj^HH|^^HHBM 



Olivet's division of the Family and Consumer Sciences Honor Society, formerly Kappa Omnicron Nu, has 
recently updated their name to specifically identify their chapter. Now referred to as Kappa Delta Rho, the 
group maintains their goal of striving to create leaders who use an integrative approach to enhancing the 
quality of life for others. This year the group helped out the community by ringing bells for the Salvation 
Army, volunteering with Rebuilding Together, a group that rehabilitates homes, and cooking dinner for a 
homeless shelter in the area. 

According to President Ali Baig, the best part is, "getting to grow close to a group people who share 
similar interests to yours that you may not Know otherwise." Benefi fs are both internal and external; not 
only do group members form friendships, but the community benefi ts too: "I hope to see Kappa Delta Rho 
growing larger and larger and making more of an impact on our community in the future," Baig said. 



-Staci Bradbury 




1. Kappa Delta Rho brings together family and consumer science majors, (kb) 2. President All Baig and 
Professor Anstrom work together to create events for the society to participate in. (kb) 3. Evelyn 
Corta Vargas helps herself to food at a party, (kb) 4. Annie Story enjoys discussing a common interest 
at meetings, (kb) 5. Having already seen significant growth, the club continues to blossom, (kb) ClUDS Ox 



Organizations 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^___ 








Lamba Pi Eta Theta Beta is an honor society for 
communication majors. Students who excel in their 
area of study, from working behind the camera to 
writing news articles, are celebrated through this pro- 
gram. "Our goals are to recognize, foster, and reward 
outstanding students in the realm of communications", 
stated President Matthew Groves. 

Members meet monthly and can be seen discuss- 
ing current issues, but also making it a point to have 
an enjoyable time. Some topics being discussed are 
the events put on by the club, such as Commies-In- 
Costume, the annual Halloween party where communi- 
cation majors come out to haunt the campus. Through 
these events, the club achieves their goal of develop- 
ing relationships. 

"I've been with these men and women in our major 
for the last four years," states Groves when recount- 
ing his years spent in Lamba Pi Eta Theta Beta. "I've 
not only seen them grow physically and change in that 
manner, but also I've had the privilege of serving beside 
them in projects and really getting to know the mem- 
bers on a deeper level." 

-Kim Kratz 

1. Lamba Pi Eta members are passionate about their ma- 
jor, (cb) 2. Matt Groves keeps meetings fun. (cb) 3. Dan- 
iel Schindel and fellow group members listen during a 
club meeting, (cb) 4. Cathy Schuft, Allison McGuire, Matt 
Groves and Tyler Allen serve as the officers of Lamba 
Pi Eta Theta Beta, (cb) 5. Matt Groves gives his council 
important information about upcoming events, (cb) 6. 
Council members take notes, (cb) 7. Cathy Schutf and 
Tania Stott write down dates for the next meeting, (cb) 
8. Tania Stott. Athina Moorehouse and Laura Fleschner 
are all smiles. 





1. The officers of mafh club 
make a pyramid, (cb) ) 2. Sarah 
Langeland and Maff Kee use a 
deck of cards to solve an equa- 
tion, (cb) 3. Carl Trank solves a 
problem through a hands-on 
activity, (cb) 4. Dr. Hathaway 
helps his students with a math 
manipulative, (cb) 




Algebraic equations, geometric proofs and imaginary numbers are common denominators that make up the 
foundation of Math Club. Delving deep into the mysteries of our universe, the members of math club use the 
universal language of numbers to uncover the answers. 

Math club is not just for those who plan on pursuing a degree in an area concerning digits, but those who 
have a passion for the numerical alphabet. "The purpose of math club is to enjoy the exhilarating, thrilling world 
of math beyond the reach of math classes," stated club President Andrew Clark. This year the club hosted "Math 
Murder Mystery", where the audience had to solve a murder using only clues of mathematical expressions to fl nd 
the killer. In this year's production, our very own Chaplain Holcomb was murdered by Matt Smith (all in good fun, 
of course). It is activities such as this that enjoyment can be found in the world of numbers. 

The Mafh Club continues to search for answers to unknown questions, discover the limits of Pi, and forego 
the luxury of calculators to expand their brain power. 

-Kim Krafz 



■MBMilMHHnHiHiMMnHMHMHIB 



Clubs & 
Organizations 

211 

MM^HHMMMMIStRMBHHI 









The Multi-Ethnic Relations club, commonly known 
as MERC, exists in the words of President Gregory Eli- 
jah Bennett, to "educate students on their own heri- 
tage, on their family, and on the person right next to 
them who is of a different race." 

MERC creates a sense of unity within the club. 
"The love and encouragement through positive friend- 
ships is my favorite part," Bennett said. One of the 
goals of MERC is for that spirit of camaraderie to 
blossom throughout campus and the entire student 
body. "God's will is for us to be unified, giving Him all 
the glory and praise. It is essential also to the univer- 
sity because all these cultures come together to learn 
natural things, but spiritually they are strengthened at 
the same time, because of the relationships founded in 
this process. The club is a vital fool used in our quest 
to love our neighbor as we would love ourselves!" 
Bennett explained. Christmas Expressions and ONU's 
Got Talent were among the annual events the group 
continued to sponsor this year. They also created a 
Facebook page and got t-shirts for the first time. 

MERC is growing faster than ever, as students learn 
to pursue God through learning about each other. As 
Bennett puts it, "Becoming a better neighbor will only 
happen if we keep God fi rst and stay passionate about 
the various ethnic groups at Olivet." 




1. The members of MERC appreciate being together and learning how 
to be a good neighbor, (ts) 2. Elijah Bennett states his opinion, (ts) 3. 
Staci Bradbury listens to her fellow club members ideas, (ts) 4. Donte 
Payne listens during a meeting.(ts) 5. Elijah Bennett attends the Martin 
Luther King Jr. community prayer breakfast, (cb) 6. Meiling Jin focuses 
at a weekly meeting, (ts) 7. Paul Conzen heads up the graphic design 
of posters and shirts for MERC, (ts) 8. Chris Tolberf leads the meeting 
by opening in prayer, (ts) 9. These women created a display case in the 
library to celebrate Black History Month in Feburary. (ts) 



-Staci Bradbury 




The best part about Mu Kappa is getting together with fellow 
students and faculty and sharing our culture." Isabella Kaburu said. 
Mu Kappa is a club designed for international students, missionary 
Kids, and other students who have spent a large portion of their 
life in other countries, to connect with each other. 



One of the highlights this year was the Thanksgiving potlucK. "It 
was a wonderful time." stated Isabella Kaburu. Kaburu would like to 
see Mu Kappa grow in the future to be able to help Olivet students 
experience other cultures. "I am hoping we would be able to hold a 
cultural week in the future," she explained. Many students who have 
grown up in the Midwest might be missing out on the gift that 
the members of Mu Kappa are. "I hope we will be able to share the 
unique, different cultures with the rest of the Olivet communityl" 
Kaburu said. 

-Staci Bradbury 



1. Mu Kappa brings cultures together without any of 
the clash, (cb) 2. Mu Kappa meets for food and fel- 
lowship in the Old Oak Lounge, (cb) 3. These ladies 
discover commonalities in their experience, (cb) 4. 
Hannah Milby and Hannah Miller discuss their cultural 
background over American food, (cb) 




Clubs & 
Organizations 

213 



ationa Ass- 




Sharing a love for and desire to teach music is what National Association for Music Educa- 
tion is all about. This is a professional club of over forty members. 

The club annually travels to Chicago for the Midwest Clinic, which is an international band 
and orchestra conference where they get to spend time with others from around the world who 
share a passion for music. They have also hosted music education lectures with guest speakers 
here on campus, as well as helped out at high schools and middle schools to prepare them for the 
Illinois Music Educations Association Prep Day. 

Members love having the opportunity to get a jump start on their majors and get in- 
volved in the community by helping out middle and high school students in the area practice their 
musical talents. 



1. The National Association for 
Music Education Club's members 
strive to teach music someday, 
(cb) 2. An engaging meeting 
among the committee members, 
(cb) 3. Ashley Raffauf and Christine 
Caven wait in the hall for a meet- 
ing to begin, (cb) 4. Kendra Cable 
and Katie Dunkman look over what 
the club aims to accomplish, (cb) 
5. Allie Richmond, Katie Dunkman, 
and Megan Huntsman listen to the 
council members speak, (cb) 6. 
Diane Rankin and Rachel Tschetter 
talk to the club during a meeting, 
(cb) 



-Allyson Vrabel 



ssoci3i ion 




National Science Teachers' Association (NSTA) is an aca- 
demic organization whose mission is to allow for development 
in Science Education. Members of NSTA are able to gain pro- 
fessional experience through teaching science lessons at local 
elementary schools. Boy Scout meetings, weekend camps, and 
other various community settings. 

In addition to volunteering, monthly meetings allow Sec- 
ondary Science Education students time to fellowship with one 
another and find support within their major. 

As President, senior Buddy Stark stated about NSTA. "It is 
a privilege to be able to lead a club where we can make sci- 
ence fun for younger students while at the same time getting 
to know other people making their way through the science 
education process." NSTA provides valuable opportunities for 
Olivet students who are passionate about science to continually 
extend to others their enthusiasm for God's creations. 

-Hannah Pargulski 

1. Rachel Damaoal gives an important demonstration, (cl) 2. Aaron 
Fiehn is really excited to get to take notes, (cl) 3. Buddy Stark 
pays attention during a meeting, (cl) 4. The group all shares a 
common love for science, (cl) 




^■i^^^^HHHHHH^HHBi 



Clubs & 
Organizations 

215 

pHMMMMHniMinNniiMMHMi 







hirlpnt 




The Nursing Student Association "provides unity 
among the nursing students and provides functions 
representative of the current professional interests of 
its members," explained President Jennifer Reirson. 

Nursing Student Association provides its members 
with various ways to get involved in the community 
with opportunities that are relevant to their major and 
provides them with a network of people that they can 
get to Know and talk to about nursing. NSA has host- 
ed and organized a fall and spring blood drive for the 
community and this year they had 198 units of blood 
donated. They also host an annual fundraiser for Ar- 
gentina missions trip to raise money for medical sup- 
plies needed for the clinics. To raise awareness in the 
local community about staying healthy, the level four 
students participate in health fairs around the county 
ever year. The club also finds unity as Christians, of- 
fering a Bible study for all nursing students. 

Nursing Student Association understands that be- 
ing a nursing major is a lot of hard work and helps to 
provide community and a group to talk about what 
they are doing, as well as to be active in the nursing 
community. 




1. Nursing Student Association members have become like a family to each 
other, (cl) 2. Abigail Bent le shares an experience about a clinical she had ear- 
lier that week, (cl) 3. Dr. Dillinger shares some laughs with the club during a 
meeting, (cl) 4. Ton Hausser listens to Dr. Dilinger as he explains about what 
is going on in the club in the coming months, (cl) 5. Kayla South listens to 
other members of the club, (cl) 6. Alisa Morris takes notes in her planner 
about upcoming events, (cl) 



-Allyson Vrabel 



. 



livet Geological Society 




Enjoy going outside and admiring the wonderful world that God created? If yes, then you share the same passion as students in Olivet's 
Geological Society. The Geological Society is for students who are geology, science education and environmental science majors, as well 
as those who love the environment and are interested in geological studies. 

The Geological Society hosts events off campus such as camping trips to get away and enjoy some time under the stars and also day 
trips to the Field Museum in Chicago. President Katie Eccles plans on going to the Field Museum at least once a year because she enjoys 
"going to visit Sue the dinosaur and check out the other fantastic exhibits. This is usually the highlight of the yeari" This year the club will be 
continuing the new tradition of a March Madness tournament for the geology department, as well as starting something new they call the 
"OGS Olympics" where members will compete in various activities to test their Knowledge and have some fun. 

The Geological Society does a great job at getting its members involved and having fun doing what they love, which makes this club 
truly rock! 

-Allyson Vrabel 






1. Professor Ryan Alexander and Buddy Stark en- 
joy their fi eld trip to Chicago, (s) 2. Olivet geo- 
logical society takes a trip to the Field Museum 
in Chicago, (s) (s) 3. Abby Boardman stands next 
to an ancient statue at the Field Museum, (s) 



Clubs & 
Organizations 



217 



■■■■■■■^^■■■i^^^^^HBHIHIII^HH^^^HHHHH^HH^^^^HBP R M! 







1. Phi Alpha Theta members enjoy each 
other's company, (cb) 2. Nicole King is 
happy to hear new ideas, (cb) 3. Erin 
Engel discusses club activities with Dr. 
William Dean, (cb) 4. Members meet in 
the of fi ce of Dr. David Van Heems.t (cb) 
5. Ryan Hayes listens intently to the new 
information in the meeting, (cb) 



The mission of Phi Alpha Theta is to promote the study of history through 
academic excellence as well as to increase awareness of historically significant 
events and contemporary issues. 

Each year is highlighted by the visit of a guest speaker, who often has political 
or historical academic influence and professes an outward belief in Jesus Christ. 
The organization sponsors this event with the political science honor society and 
students from a variety of majors are welcome to attend. 

Reflecting on the year overall, President Erin Engel noted, "It has been a blend- 
ing of looking in the past for guidance but also looking towards the future in how 
one thinks it ought to be done." Engel expressed that she felt appreciative for 
being able to lead the society. "This responsibility has challenged me in a variety 
of ways for which I have become very grateful. It has taught me that since I claim 
my allegiance with Christ, there is nothing that can be done without Him." 

-Hannah Pargulski 







Psi Chi was founded for the purpose of encouraging a high level of learn- 
ing among psychology majors, but as President senior Hannah Im said, "The 
achievement lies behind the purpose of giving glory to God." Psi Chi mem- 
bers strive to reach out and build relationships with other students, profes- 
sors, and the community all in the name of Jesus, in ways such as volunteering 
at Riverside Health Care Center. 

Although challenging to lead the organization, Im stated, "Committee mem- 
bers Allyse Moore, Tayler St. Aubin, and Amy Enderli brought fresh and keen 
insights and ideas to the fable that I would not have been able to generate 
myself." The goals of this group were to create activities that encouraged 
bonding between underclassmen and upperclassmen, as well as to demon- 
strafe what it means to be psychology students at a Christian university and 
leading Christian psychologists in the future. 

-Hannah Pargulski 





1. Erin Blucker listens to new events in the club.(cb) 2. Han- 
nah Im starts off a Psi Chi meeting, (cb) 3. Allyse Moore 
participates in club discussions, (cb) 




Clubs & 
Organizations 

219 



Pre-Law So 






sA 































Ji 


i 
















While fighting battles in the courtroom, enthralling a 
jury, and defending justice, Pre-Law Society members 
prepare for a future career in the courtroom. 

Many students develop a passion for justice and 
the foundations upon which our country was built sim- 
ply by taking a class and learning about the Constitu- 
tion. Pre-Law Society fuels that interest in students by 
nurturing and growing the Knowledge through life and 
law experiences. In the past. Judges have been called to 
come speak on campus and share their life experiences 
and wisdom in order to develop students who will be 
taking their place in the future. This year the club has 
expanded its borders by "incorporating more classes for 
club members concerning the LSAT and preparing those 
members who want to pursue that road lof law!", ex- 
plained Pre-Law Society President Nicole King about this 
years activities. 

This group of determined young students are fight- 
ing to make their mark in the world, as well as endorsing 
the battle to uphold the foundations that our nation was 
built upon. 

-Kim Kratz 



1. Pre-Law society members enjoy getting together and 
helping each other with their major, (cb) 2. Erin Engel dis- 
cusses events at a meeting, (cb) 3. Nicole King and Kath- 
leen Farns enjoy a club meeting, (cb) 4. Kathleen Farris 
states her opinion, (cb) 5. Kathleen Farris and Nicole King 
have become good friends through Pre-Law society, 
(cb) 



f icer's C 




Officer's Christian Fellowship is a ministry that exists to promote unity 
between the students who are training to be future officers in the ROTC 
program, but also military members here on campus. 

"Not only do we desire these students to be leaders in the military, but 
missionaries as well." stated President Paul Jackson. Members are given op- 
portunities to grow spiritually and prepare for the future of leading people 
in a field where spirituality is very rarely encountered. One activity that the 
club looks forward to is the annual retreat, where a group of officers-in- 
training leave campus for three days to spend time under the disopleship of 
a former military leader, who teaches on how to share and demonstrate Je- 
sus in the service. This year's speaker was Major Jim McKnight who served 
as a Ranger and is now in the Georgia National Guard. 

Experiences like this serve the purpose of furthering the Kingdom of God 
in all branches of the military and in everyday life. The students learn in Of- 
icer's Christian Fellowship give their life for their country, while at the same 
time sharing the story of the Man who laid down His life for them. 




Alan Meyers. Zach Bishop and Josiah Berg enjoy 
a night of friends and fellowship, (s) 2. Members of 
OCF take a group picture next to the Tiger out- 
side McHie Arena, (s) 3. Offi cer's Christian Fellowship 
members enjoy a bonfire at Fortin Villa.(s) 4. Aaron 
Wesferfi eld sits next to the bonfi re. (s) 5. Sebastiana 
Basham and Clinton Casey carve pumpkins during a 
Halloween party, (s) 



Clubs & 
Organizations 



221 



■Mgjj^^BH^HaHB^BHMMHHMH^^H||MBjH[jj^^Mjj|MHHHHj 







1. Kyle Peachey walks the path as an example to younger 
cadets, (bb 2. Cody McGraw and Micah Bennett dem- 
onstrate communication and teamwork, (bb) 3. Andrew 
Schmitz braves the cold, (bb) 4. These ROTC cadets take 
a minute to reload in the woods, (bb) 5. Michael Hileman 
is ready to go. 6. Desmond Handson thinks through his 
mission, (bb) 7. Eliseo Betancourt sets his sight on the 
target, (bb) 



ROTC, the Reserve Officers' Training Corps, at Olivet is a branch of 
the army that provides scholarship and teaches leadership and army 
training to its cadets. The cadets in the Olivet branch, the Roaring Tiger 
Battalion, are known to be both early risers and hard workers. The resolve 
and commitment of this battalion has been noticed by others outside of 
the Olivet community as well. Reporter for the Kankakee "Daily Journal," 
Phil Angelo wrote that Olivet, "with 85 Army cadets working toward a 
commission as a second lieutenant, has the largest Army ROTC battalion 
in the state... the battalion is in the top 10 percent of the nation's Army 
ROTC programs." For the cadets, ROTC is hard work, but it is also a 
blessing. Military science level- III cadets Wade Bruce and Ben Lucas say, 
"we appreciate ROTC because through the program we were able to 
receive full scholarship for Olivet and have the opportunity to practice 
leadership while developing as students." 

- Kayla Koury 






m 



Student 



ssocianon 




Student Education Association exists to provide Education majors with the opportunity to 
learn how to teach and creates opportunities for Education majors to get experience in three 
main areas, according to Vice-President Anna Carlson: experience with children, the commu- 
nity, and a professional organization. 

'We are an organization that offers services to local school districts," faculty advisor Dr. Dale 
Oswalt explained. "We help teachers in their classrooms and we offer tutoring to students at 
their parents' request. We also help out with children's programs at local churches." By offering 
these services, both the community and students are benefi ted. Students have the chance to 
get their feet wet in real-life teaching, and the community gets the services. 

As the biggest organization on campus, SEA hosts a myriad of events. One highlight 
was the Christmas party, which featured a "housewalk" between several Education professors 
'opened their homes to the students for snacks, games, and fellowship," Carlson said. SEA 
also had two t-shirt sales and donated nine science kits to Shepard Community in Indianapolis. 
Overall. SEA creates a symbiotic relationship between students and the community and reap 
a huge benefit of experience, which is key in the teaching profession. 

-Staci Bradbury 



1. Anna Carlson, Dr. Dale Oswalt, Sarah Da- 
vis, Brittany Scruggs, Kendra Krestan and 
Lmdsey Kirchner make up the SEA officer 
council, (s) 2. Every Christmas. SEA mem- 
bers travel to homes of professors in the 
education department to make cookies, 
(s) 3. April Culver listens to a student state 
ways to honor her parents, (bb) 4. Mar- 
tha Arntson helps a girl at College Church 
complete here worksheet, (bb) 5. Bethany 
Meredith helps students fi nish their home- 
work, (bb) 




Clubs & 
Organizations 

223 








What happens when you get a group of bright in- 
dividuals who know a lot about business and aspire to 
achieve great career goals such as CEO's or entrepre- 
neurs? They raise $23,000 dollars for Haiti Water Proj- 
ect and come in runner-up at regional competitions. 

Students in Free Enterprise, also known as SIFE, ex- 
ists to provide students with an opportunity to work 
together and apply what they have been taught in class 
to the community. SIFE's mission statement is: "to bring 
together the fop leaders of today and tomorrow to 
create a better, more sustainable world through the 
positive power of business." Students involved in this 
group truly believe that this is essential to their major 
as well as their everyday life. Michael Tuttle, President 
of SIFE, stated, "SIFE is an important organization for all 
business majors as well as students in other majors to 
get involved in." 

Some SIFE projects have impacted Olivet and the 
community by going out and teaching business skills to 
the local schools and detention centers. They have also 
looked beyond campus by sponsoring events such as 
the Haiti Water Project. 

-Allyson Vrabel 




1. Members attend a local elementary school hold a demonstration about 
needs versus wants, (s) 2. SIFE Life holds a panel at one of the local 
schools to answer questions, (s) 3. SIFE life answers questions at an el- 
ementary school about business, (s) 4. Brittany Pals and Lauren Blunier 
enjoy time together at a meeting. (s)"5. SIFE partnered up with Mandy 
Benoitt to help promote her jewelry line this year, (s) 



Spoons 4 Forks 



When you go to a show for Spoons 4 Forks, you never Know 
what to what will happen-except laughter, of course! 

Spoons 4 Forks is set apart from the typical improv group in that 
their material is clean and they honor God with their talent. They 
travel to local churches and usually have a monthy show where they 
fill the auditorium. 

Member Jonathan Shreves loves the fact that, "it is very family- 
oriented. We eat dinner, hang out and do traveling shows together." 
Each member of the group thoroughly loves being involved and 
having the chance to share their talent. Becca Yates says, "We look 
forward to practicing, and if is our favorite part of the week." 



-Allyson Vrabel 





1. Erin Harmon acts out a scene 
during one of their performances, 
(ts) 2. Becca Yates, Alex Green, 
and Matt Wilson act out a scene 
about a little kid who wants cot- 
ton candy, (ts) 3. Eric Harmon and 
Matt Wilson act out a refrigerator 
cleaning competition, (ts) 4. Eric 
Harmon and Becca Yates try to 
defeat Jonathan Shreves as he acts 
like a giant evil popsicle. (ts) 5. Matt 
Wilson cries during a skit for add- 
ed effect and extra laughter, (ts) 6. 
Though, the group may get a little 
crazy on stage, they truly love be- 
ing together and putting on shows, 
(ts) 



Clubs & 
Organizations 

225 



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Return to the days of being a freshman on cam- 
pus as you enter the cafeteria for the fi rst time and 
all of the different scents envelope your senses. 
There are so many choices that you can't decide, 
so you pick one of everything. Welcome to col- 
lege and the famous "Freshman Fifteen!" This is 
exactly the type of situation and lifestyle that 
Student Dietetic Association, also known as SDA, 
fry to improve upon. "Everything is okay to eat 
in moderation," Martha Harrouff advises, who has 
been a member of the club for three years. "I have 
often found that individuals don't think that they 
can eat desserts or other "junk" foods, but in ac- 
tuality, this is not realistic or even enjoyable. God 
created food for us to enjoy, and as long as we 
treat it as His creation and are good stewards of if, 
we have no reason to severely restrict our diets." 

The club stands on the principles of glorifying 
God by preserving the body He gave us, which 
is essentially His temple. Promoting health, happi- 
ness, and God, the club gives all dietetics majors 
a chance to expand their knowledge and form ha- 
bitual lifestyles. 

-Kim Kratz 



1. Members of SDA are passionate about the group 
and are proud of its accomplishments, (cb) 2. SDA 
members listen during a club meeting, (ch) 3. Me- 
linda Jones fakes notes from lecture, (ch) 4. Ali Baig 
takes down notes before leading the meeting, (cb) 
5. Martha Harrouff gets excited about the lesson. 
(cb) 6. SDA plans their upcoming event, (ch) 



m 



udent Union Family & 




SUFACS stands for Student Union Family and Consumer Science, the department 
of majors ranging from fashion to finance. The group's main event is the annual FACS 
Fashion Show, which is utilized as the department's main source of fundraising. This year 
Brandi Meyers and Zipporah Kapambwe were in charge of putting the show together. 
The fashion show is fi rst open to anyone in FACS who wants to be apart of it, and then 
we often fi nd people outside of FACS to fi II the model spots," explains Brandi, "It is just 
a really fun event that happens on campus." 

The overall point of the club is to draw all of the FACS students into one group of 
people who are like-minded and can conjoin their creativity. This is represented by their 
motto "All for one and one for all." They use the reminder and example of Christ to set 
the standard that everyone has a purpose and their gifts can serve a variety of people. 

-Kim Kratz 






1. Caitlin Charles and Brandi Meyers plan out 
a creative project, (ch) 2. SUFACS mem- 
bers pose for a group photo, (ch) 3. Stu- 
dents bring together their ingenuity, (ch) 
4. Sarah Durazo plans for the upcoming 
Fashion Show, (ch) 5. Lauren Fogwell asks 
advice on a layout, (ch) 6. Michael Johnson 
works with fabric swatches, (ch) 7. Brandi 
Meyers and Brittany Pals pair different ma- 
terials together, (ch) 






Clubs & 
Organizations 

227 



"-" ~"~"'~ - " 







Sigma Tau Delta exists to promote high achieve- 
ment in the English language and literature, and each 
year members participate in the Sigma Tau Delta 
convention presenting academic work. The club 
also assists in preparing a team of students to go to 
Burkina Faso in Africa in order to mentor university 
students completing their thesis papers. 

One of the reasons historian senior Kayla Koury 
enjoys the organization is because it provides op- 
portunities to "do service projects like helping with 
research for African students or wrapping presents 
at Barnes and Noble." 

One of the most rewarding aspects of Sigma Tau 
Delta is that members are able to spend time with 
other English majors. As President senior Jeannefte 
Kirchner said, "Even after graduation, members can 
still continue to grow with Sigma Tau Delta fueled 
by the passion of the English discipline." 

-Hannah Pargulski 



1. Sigma Tau Delta is a growing group with 34 active mem- 
bers, (bb) 2. Vice-president Emily Spunaugle presents infor- 
mation to the group, (bb) 3. Senior Jessica Schewe studies 
the written word, (bb) 4. Jeannefte Kirchner and Kayla Koury 
induct Katie Peugh. (bb) 5. Angela Lee reads from the Sigma 
Tau constitution, (bb) 6. English majors are inducted as part 
of the Sigma Tau Delta Olivet chapter, (bb) 



mm 



enth Reel Film Club 





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The Seventh Reel Fim Clubl is a student-led organization not only for movie and fi Im 
enthusiasts, but for anyone who enjoys spending time with friends. 

The organization sponsors several social events each year in order to promote the 
cultural awareness of fi Im. One highlighted event is the outdoor movie in the fall. This 
year's featured movie was Toy Story 3, and hundreds of students came to watch and 
enjoy an evening with friends. Another event is the Film Festival in April, which show- 
cases fi Ims submitted by talented students on campus. Vice President Chelsea Hays has 
noted. "It's a great way for non-members to get involved with our club." 

One of the central characteristics of the club is being able to fellowship. As President 
Kelly Nelson said, "Watching movies is a great way to take a break from the everyday 
and bond with fellow students who share similar interests." 

-Hannah Pargulski 



1. Kelly Nelson gives her opinion on a 
movie, (ch) 2. Each member is able to 
share their opinions, (ch) 3. Jeremy Height 
analyzes a recent fi Im. (ch) 4. Jose Cruz 
offers a dissenting thought, (ch) 5. Alexia 
Wilson enjoys the meeting, (ch) 6. An- 
drew Oliver likes being part of a fun club, 
(ch) 7. Members of Seventh Reel enjoy 
getting to together to discuss their fa- 
vorite fi Ims. (ch) 



Clubs & 
Organizations 

229 



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s New 




All Things New is a ministry on campus that uses their 
vocal talent to praise God. A commitment to All Things New 
means spending a summer and the following school year 
serving people by attending Kids' youth camps, touring for 
churches, and then weekly ministry on campus once school 
starts, "Being a part of this ministry has strengthened my 
relationship with Christ in a way that nothing else ever has," 
explained Josh Gill, who plays guitar and does vocals. "God 
used this band to tear apart all my pride. Also, giving a com- 
plete summer and school year to serving people has truly 
taught me the meaning of living a selfless life." 

Members of All Things New are living out their passion 
for music and Christ in an accumulation of what could be 
the best ministry of their lives. They truly do get the best 
of both worlds; serving God and getting to use their talents 
to do if. 

-Kim Kratz 



1. All Things New travels to churches to share their passion for 
God through music, (cl) 2. Courtney Cryer plays the keyboard 
while singing "How He loves." (s) 3. Jesse Dillman strums the bass 
guitar, (cl) 4. Jordan Hansen keeps the beat on the drums, (cl) 5. 
Josh Gill leads worship in chapel, (cl) 6. Kayla Davenport raises her 
hands and voice to God. (cl) 




!■ 



omorrow 




Before Tomorrow is a student-led ministry team driven 
to worship the Lord through music. Band members strive to 
make the spirit of worship not only present during worship 
services, but a way of life. As Road Manager Andrew Strom- 
beck said, "We have a passion for people and seeing God 
work in amazing ways." 

During the school year. Before Tomorrow leads worship 
at different churches and youth retreats and travels to youth 
camps during the summer, reaching out to teens and show- 
ing them Christ's love. 

The team enjoys the privilege of experiencing God's grace 
with other worshipers and is surrounded by band members 
who love the Lord. "Leading a group like that is never a bur- 
den, but a blessing," Strombeck said. "This, as well as being 
able to share about our God and what He has done for me, is 
my motivation to do what I do." 

-Hannah Pargulski 



1. Kelsey Sowards leads worship, (fs) 2. Tyson Dodd plays gui- 
tar during praise and worship for the first chapel of the school 
year, (ts) 3. Before Tomorrow uses their musical talents to 
praise God. (s) 





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Music 

233 




1. The girls learn a new song for an 
upcoming concert, (cb) 2. Whitney 
Foster focuses on getting the words 
correct as they practice a new song, 
(cb) 3. Catherine Young hits a high 
note while singing "For Good." (cb) 4. 
The off cers of Chrysalis enjoy work- 
ing such a wonderful group of women, 
(cb) 5. Bethany Meyer sings during a 
concert, (cb) 6. Rehearsing takes a lot 
of work, but Chrysalis always shows 
us that it is worth it. (cb) 




Chrysalis is a unique campus choir because it is designed for only 
women. Much like Gospel Choir or Testament Choir, being involved 
doesn't mean that you have to be a music major, and it provides a 
sense of family-oriented fellowship and the ability to grow close with 
other women with similar desires. 

Chrysalis has performed in various concerts and tours this year, in- 
cluding a chapel service. Fall Revival, as well as in Sounds of the Season. 
They sing songs of great variety anywhere from gospel and hymn ar- 
rangements, to more contemporary influenced pieces. 

This year, more women were able to be involved in Chrysalis due to 
the music department switching around schedules of the choirs so that 
more people can now be involved. This provides the Chrysalis women 
with the opportunity to perform more often and in more of a variety of 
music selections than before. 

- Staci Bradbury 











rt Band 



Concert Band members have performed in chapel, Sounds of the Season, and Band Winter Showcase. Band Winter Show- 
case allows students to perform original music that Olivet students have composed mixed with some comedy and some 
amazing solo pieces to show off their musical talent. This year, Owen Blough had the opportunity to write the percussion 
piece as well as a solo, which was a major crowd pleaser. Owen has enjoyed his experience in band stating, "My experience 
in band has been that it is a great way to make music with good friends." Concert Band collaborates with various other 
ensembles on and off campus around the year as well. 

Concert Band is a great way for students to stay involved with band after high school and to Keep the same sense of 
unity with other musicians as well as make wonderful music. The members of Concert Band work hard in practices in order 
to glorify God with their music at every performance. 

- Allyson Vrabel 




1. All instruments require tuning be- 
fore performance, (cb) 2. Students 
pause to listen to the conductor's 
feedback, (cb) 3. Dr. Neal McMullian 
conducts the wind instruments dur- 
ing a practice, (cb) 4. The percussion 
section rehearses for an upcoming 
performance (cb) 5. Students take a 
break during rehearsal, (cb) 



Music 



235 



oncert S 



1. Concert singers practice for 
an upcoming performance, (ts) 

2. Chris LeFevre harmonizes 
with the rest of the choir, (ts) 

3. Ben Geeding appreciates the 
chance to participate in concert 
singers (ts) 4. Students practice 
around the piano in the choir 
room, (ts) 5. Gwen Holmes hits 
the note perfectly, (ts) 6. Reu- 
ben Lillie practices his solo, (ts) 
7. John Mikhail and Andrew Niel- 
son lift their voices in song dur- 
ing practice, (ts) 8. Ashley Raf- 
fauf joins the rest of the choir, 
(ts) 





Concert Singers is a small but talented select ensemble of mixed voices. Alicia Carter described the group as "a team 'sport,' anc 
Concert Singers is a great team. We play well together, have a great coach, and love the game!" 

Dr. Neal Woodruff directs the singers in performing a variety of recitals such as madrigals, classical and contemporary works, anc 
jazz standards. Every other year the ensemble travels internationally, and in the past the group has had the opportunity to sing ir 
Germany, Switzerland, Hong Kong, and South Korea. 

Members of Concert Singers are driven by their passion for music. As Carter expressed, "I feel so honored and blessed to be a pari 
of this group, not only because of the vast range of music literature that we explore, the amazing friendships that are formed, or the 
phenomenal leadership that we have through Dr. Woodruff, but also because there are moments where everything meshes perfectly 
and true music is made." 

-Hannah Pargulski 



Handbe 




Professor Kathenne Nielsen, who directs the handbell choir, said about her position of leadership, "The handbell choir is a pleasure 
for me to work with because I enjoy fi nding fun, original compositions for handbells and I love revisiting old hymns in new settings." 
Each semester, the choir has the opportunity to perform in the various Chamber Ensemble concerts. Sounds of the Season is one 
of the highlighted concerts in which the choir performs. This year, tickets sold out quickly as hundreds of students and family 
members fi lied Kresge Auditorium to enjoy the anticipated performance. 

Choir member Josh Gnffes noted, "I enjoy handbells because they are unique instruments that are fun to play and offer many 
different things you can do." With their calming, sweetly angelic-like sound, the handbells certainly add a distinct element to each 
Olivet music performance. 



-Hannah Pargulski 



1. Kathenne Nielsen conducts the handbell choir, 
(ch) 2. Diane Rankin practices her piece, (ch) 3 The 
handbell choir diligently works to perfect their next 
performance, (ch) 4. Desiree Hays concentrates on 
her part, (ch) 5. Stephanie Jungles reads the notes, 
(ch) 




Music 

237 




1. The trombone section shows off 
their skills during jazz band prac- 
tice, (ts) 2. Zach Kholmeier rocks 
a solo, (ts) 3. These students play 
their saxophones like jazz legends, 
(ts) 4. Allyse Groover pumps up 
practice on the xylophone, (ts) 5. 
Dr. Don Reddick directs the jazz 
band during practice, (ts) 6. Ryan 
Lalone concentrates on playing 
the keyboard during band prac- 
tice, (ts) 




Fun. Crazy. Always different. Loud. Wild. These are all words that 
come to mind when people talk about Olivet's Jazz Band. 

What sets Jazz Band apart from a typical concert band is both the 
style of music played, which can be anything from Swing to Latin, and 
also the instruments included. According to Renee Runyan, a freshman 
Music Education major. Jazz Band includes a full trumpet, trombone and 
saxophone sections, as well as a rhythm section of drums, auxiliary per- 
cussion, guitar and bass guitar, and keyboards. 

"The best part of Jazz Band is the unity of the band and the sounds 
we get when we have a full section," she said. With hopes to one day 
direct a high school Jazz Band, Runyan believes that Jazz Band has "giv- 
en me many tools that I can use to help me get there." 



With their unique style of music, the band is in demand to provide 
music for events such as Grandparent's Day, Ladies Day, and the Candy 
Costume Festival, which Runyan considers one of the highlights of the 
year. "It was very fun and I enjoyed seeing everyone dressed up for 
Halloween," she said. 

-Staci Bradbury 




1. Isaac Burch adds his guitar to the bottom of the musical pyramid, which is built up from the lower sounds, (ts) 2. With 
smaller numbers, more pressure rests on individual performers to excel, (ts) 3. Rae Marie Donaldson has earned a reputation as 
an excellent trumpet player, (ts) 4. Seth Lowery adds his tenor voice to the ensemble, (ts) 5. Josh Ring provides background 
music with a Keyboard, (ts) 6. Drums act as the thread that unites the musicians and Keeps them on beat, (ts) 




While certainly a sister to Jazz Band. Jazz Combo carries its own unique set of musical challenges with a limited number of wind instruments and 
an emphasis on improvisation. "What I love about Jazz Combo is the size of the band." freshman Renee Runyan said. "It is more of an individual thing. 
yet we worK together to maKe music!" The smaller numbers of Jazz Combo puts more pressure on an individual to perform well. 

For these musicians, improvising is an essential skill: "Jazz combo has really helped with improvisation," Runyan said, "and I'm 'speaKmg the lan- 
guage' of improvisation better nowi" Having started out playing baritone saxophone, learning to improv has been difficult for Runyan. since the 
lower instruments typically bacK up the higher instruments performing solos, rather than do it themselves. She points to Professor Freddie FranKen. 
"a phenomenal guitar player," as a significant influence in her life. 

As anyone who plays an instrument Knows, skill taKes practice. Runyan, however, thinks the worK is worth the final reward: "Music is a huge part 
of life, and just enriching others' lives with it is a fantastic opportunity," she said. "I think the part that is a little exhausting at times is all the time and 
effort that is put info all of my things. But I have learned that success always comes before work in a dictionary, and with hard work, determination, 
and the strength given to me by God I can persevere and do if!" > , 

-Staci Bradbury OQQ 

~" 




The marching band at Olivet is very dedicated group of musicians. 
They attend every single football game, and when they arrive early in 
mid-August for the proverbial "band camp," members are thrown into 
a fhree-a-day practice regimen. Begining around 9:00 in the mornning, 
marching band members practice marching on the field until lunchtime. 
After lunch, they have another practice focusing on the actual music. After 
dinner, they would combine the two into a playing and marching practice 
until late hours of the night, striving for perfection. 

"Basically we learned everything we did during the school year dur- 
ing camp," Jeremy Atwood explained. "It was nice to meet people before 
school started." The band works hard and their hard work shows in their 
excellent musical talent. 

-Staci Bradbury 



1. Marching band is a complex combination of musi- 
cal expertise and walking formations, (ch) 2. Member: 
dance across the field during half time at the Home- 
coming football game, (ch) 3. Floutists play the Olive 
fight song, (ch) 4. The percussion section takes th< 
initiative to have extra practices, (ch) 5. Percussioi 
members keep the beat, (ch) 6. The color guard add 
to the band's performance with lots of fancy fl ag ma- 
neuvers, (ch) 



i 



rpheus 



1. Orpheus members perform a skit joking about Olivet's male-fo-female ratio (bb) 2. Orpheus performs with Larnelle Harris 
during a homecoming concert, (bb) 3. Joey Ramirez performs his own version of California Girls during the annual Orpheus 
Variety show. (Pb) 4. Orpheus memPers enjoy rehearsal, (bb) 5. Orpheus members await direction from Dr. Bell, (bb) 




Kyle Hance, a sophomore in Orpheus, explains how his passion tor this musical 
ministry shaped his decision to come to Olivet: "I Knew that if I were indeed com- 
ing to Olivet that I would have to be in Orpheus." 

One of the best times in Orpheus was the formal in Chicago in April 2010. The 
group spent the night reveling in glamour, dressed to the nines. Funny memories 
were made as friends attempted to bowl and ended up gallivanting to Ghirardelli's 
for fantastic shakes. Good times kept coming as the group hit the road for the fall 
tour, when members traveled through Indiana in November. The songs sung by the 
group all hold an individual message, and during the trip they seemed to be more 
impacting than ever by revealing the true nature of God in a "life-changing" way. 
From fun to life-impacting experiences, Orpheus choir is instrumental in shaping 
the lives of those who hear the songs as well as those who sing them. 

-Kim Kratz 



Music 

241 




1. Mike Neil and Melody Abbott 
play the triangle during practice, 
(ch) 2. Melody Abbott Keeps the 
beat in percussion combo prac- 
tice, (ch) 3. Mike Zanng and Aman- 
da Winkle play the xylophone, 
(ch) 4. Professor Matthew Jacklin 
leads the percussion combo in a 
Larsen practice room, (ch) 5. Mike 
Zanng, Mike Neil, and Austin Lappe 
arrange musical scores during 
practice, (ch) 



Percussion Combo provides percussionists at Olivet 
with an opportunity to spend time together learning from 
and with each other, as well as the opportunity to com- 
pete against other percussionists and put on concerts to 
show their talent. 



The percussion comPo has the opportunity to put 
on concert events on campus for the student body, and 
to perform with other musical groups on campus, such 
as Testament, hand bell choir, and orchestra and concert 
band. Kaleb Soller, who has been involved in Percus- 
sion Combo for the last two years, he explains, "We are 
a group of percussionists who perform select pieces at 
various concerts, including commencement." Soller had 
the opportunity this year to perform in the commence- 
ment competition and was selected to play. 

Percussion Combo allows its members to gain experi- 
ence and challenges them to push themselves to achieve 
higher standards in the music world, while letting them 
have fun and get to know each other. 

- Allyson Vrabel 




stament 







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^ 




1. The men of Testament get to spend a lot of time together and re- 
ally enjoy bonding and becoming a family, (cb) 2. Reuben Lillie was in 
Testament last year, and this year he is the student conductor, (cb) 
3. Testament practices for an upcoming event, (cb) 4. Reuben Lillie 
conducts the men's choir during a practice, (cb) 5. Ben Geeding reads 
over the sheet music to make sure he hits the right notes, (cb) 



The men's Testament choir is the oldest music group 
on campus. This year it switched directors to Professor Ryan 
Schulfz and the student director is Reuben Lillie. Like the other 
choir groups on campus they tour three times a year. They 
recently changed their schedule so it does not interfere with 
Orpheus, giving students the ability to be in both choirs. 

The choir sings a variety of songs ranging from hymns to 
contemporary, and even some secular pieces written specifi- 
cally for men's choirs. Not all members of Testament are music 
majors and the group is actually very diverse. They are close 
because of two very important things: "The main things that 
we have in common is our love for God and that we love to 
sing," said director Reuben Lillie. 

The choir is a very unique alliance that allows its members 
to be in the presence of God as well as sing great songs of 
praise. It is a brotherhood they all truly cherish. 

-Allyson Vrabel 



Music 

243 





1. The Olivetians: Wesley Taylor, 
Merrick Robison, Jenna Dickey. 
Luke Olney. Katrina Hurt. Allison 
Wiseman, Laura Fleschner and Jac- 
quelyn Owens use their gifts to 
praise the Lord through song, (s) 

2. Wesley Taylor lifts his voice to 
God. (bb) 3. The Olivetians fi II the 
chapel with beautiful music, (bb) 
4. The group travels to churches 
throughout the summer, (s) 5. 
Laura Fleschner. Merrick Robison. 
Jenna Dickey and Luke Olney sing 
during the dedication of the Betty 
and Kenneth Hawkins Centennial 
Chapel, (bb) 




Sophomore Wesley Taylor is one of the newer faces to be seen on f 
the prestigious Olivet musical ministry, the Olivetians. This group of talented 
students travels through throughout the Olivet region promoting the gospel 
through their vocal abilities. 

As a freshman sitting in Chalfant Hall during Jumpstart Wesley saw the 
Olivetians perform for the fi rst time. They stole the show and his heart, mak- 
ing him fall in love with the style of music they perform. "I decided right 
then that I would audition for that group when the time came," reminisces 
Wesley. "What really makes the Olivetians different from the other groups 
I'm involved in is that the relationships are completely different and in many 
ways, stronger." United by the goal of showing the love of God from a musi- 
cal standpoint, this gifted bunch of students has the ability to stand together 
and praise the Lord through their beautiful melodies. 

This year has been a bonding experience that will not be forgotten. The 
memories shared and the lives that have been blessed hold testimony to 
what the Olivetians are doing in their mission to fulfill God's call on their 
lives. 

-Kim Kratz 





"I respect Dr. Woodruff because of the passion he 
has for what he does," says Nicholas Holden, freshman 
bassist in the Olivet Orchestra. Nicholas is one of six 
bassists, but there is a total of fifty students who par- 
ticipate in the Orchestra altogether. Dr. Woodruff is the 
leader of the orchestra and he skillfully directs these 
fifty students. 

The Orchestra has performed in many different ven- 
ues, including playing at the dedication of the Centen- 
nial Chapel during fall semester and playing with spe- 
cial incoming artists such as the duo Stephen Nielson 
and Ovid Young in December. Orchestra is made up 
of many different students with various personalities, 
but all possess a passion for music. They are known for 
their talent and almost all events put on by the talented 
musical group are sold out. 

Olivet is very blessed to have this program and the 
students that come with if. Through the events and 
practices, students are given the opportunity to grow 
and develop their talents as well as their personalities 
and relationships with others. 

-Kim Kratz 




1. The lady violinists make their instruments sing, (cl) 2. Zach Thomas 
tunes his violin for practice, (cl) 3. The orchestra ladies show their stage 
value, (cl) 4. Bryan Kosek reads his music during Messiah rehearsal, (cl) 



Music 



245 



■■IH^^^HIHHHHHHHHiHIHHM-__H__HilH___ 




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(bb) 






dan Gra 




Jordan Grambush is a senior bi- 
ology major at Olivet from Fenton, 
Michigan. She has two younger twin 
sisters, and a yellow lab named Sun- 
ny. Jordan's life at Olivet is fi lied with 
science, God, friends, and room- 
mates. But on top of all of that, Jor- 
dan is a member of the very fi rsf Ol- 
ivet Tigers women's golf team, and 
she loves it. 

Jordan started her college ca- 
reer at Rochester College where 
she played golf her freshman and 
sophomore years. Jordan decided to 
transfer to Olivet her junior year of 
college in order to study biology to 
fulfi II the call she feels on her life to 
work in pediatrics. Once she decided 
to transfer she was contacted by 
the Olivet Athletic Department ask- 
ing her to play golf as a Tiger. 

Jordan started playing golf her 
freshman year of high school. She had 
never played before but decided she 
wanted to give it a fry. Golf seemed 
to run in Jordan's blood as her uncle, 
a golf pro, told her that she was a 
natural. Jordan enjoyed the sport be- 
cause it was "something for just {her} 
and Iherl dad to do together." Jordan 
liked this special bonding time and 
when she first started to play she 
even used her dad's clubs from high 
school. 

Although she enjoyed playing 
in high school Jordan never thought 
that golf would become part of her 
college career. But when she got the 
call to play at Rochester she decided 
she wanted to continue. All of these 



life experiences and decisions then led 
up to her spot on the team at Olivet. At 
Rochester, Jordan was the only girl her 
freshman year, but coming to Olivet 
she joined a team with ten other girls, 
all just beginning their Olivet golf ca- 
reers due to the newly added team. For 
Jordan, these girls have been one of the 
best parts about playing for the Tigers. 
She said, "These girls are so sweet and 
we share a great outlook on Christian- 
ity." 

The sense of community on the 
team was emphasized this year after 
head coach Bill Johnson's wife passed 
away from cancer. Jordan said the 
team rallied together in this very sad 
time and offered support, prayers, and 
a sense of community for their coach. 
Jordan said, "We gathered together in 
prayer, brought food for him and his 
daughter, and would go to his house to 
just sit and spend time with him." This 
sad passing did affect the team as they 
had to adjust practice schedules, but 
Jordan said they were able to work it all 
out and just wanted to do everything 
in their power to make things easier for 
their coach. Jordan said this tragedy 
"made us stronger as a team and really 
helped us to get to know each other as 
we were able to come together." 

Jordan is the co-captain of the ONU 
women's golf team and she is proud of 
the success and effort that her team 
has put into this year. Golf is a fall and 
spring sport so the team works almost 
year round to stay in shape and perfect 
their game. 



In the nicer weather, they go out to 
the golf course at least twice a week, 
or they go to a range behind Wal-Mart. 
In the off season, the girls work on nu- 
trition and core building as they prepare 
for the upcoming competition. They 
have medaled individually in several 
different meets, and even got the op- 
portunity to play in a Division I tourna- 
ment which Jordan said was, "humbling 
because we were on some very diffi - 
cult courses, but it was a great experi- 
ence." The women on the team work 
hard and have represented their coach 
and university well thus far. 

Jordan said, "In my biology courses 
here at Olivet I have learned more than 
ever how everything is connected. I 
have learned how science and God re- 
ally do fit together. Since golf is both 
an individual and team sport you really 
fi nd out who you are and you learn how 
to integrate all these things. I've learned 
how faith and character can be devel- 
oped through golf and these things 
drive our team." 

-Kayla Koury 



Sports 

249 



— 








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1. Olivet's defensive line rushes to tackle fh 
running back, (ch) 2. Reginald Davis races t 
stop the ball, (ch) 3. The Tigers wait for trj 
snap, (ch) 4. A defensive lineman gets ready ti 
defend his territory, (ch) 5. The deffensive lir 
is ready for another play, (ch) 6. Both tearr 
scramble for the ball, (ch) 7. Austin Johnsc 
catches the pass, (ch) 8. The 2010-2011 Fool 
ball Team, (s) 




9. An ONU player awaits the impending play, (ch) 10. Marc Jones closes 
in on the opposing quarterback, (ch) 11. The Tigers play hard to stop 
the opposing team trom gaining a yard, (ch) 12. Aaron Link pumps his 
fist atter a touchdown, (ch) 13. Chad McDaniel valiantly blocks tor his 
quarterback, (ch) 14. Kossi Komlassen stands ready for an interception, 
(ch) 15. The two teams meet to face off. (ch) 16. Marty Pntchett stops 
his man in his tracks, (ch) 




Despite the fact that there were no W's on the stats, 
the football team won on many other fields this sea- 
son: "This year was good in the fact that we were more 
united, "said Marty Pntchett, senior and team captain: 
"There were no such things as upperclassmen and lower- 
classmen." As the team travelled to West Virginia for their 
fl rst away game, the ride back provided ample opportu- 
nity for "team bonding time" as a bus broke down: "It's 
the kind of thing we will be able to look back and laugh 
at," said Marty. Hopes are high for next year as changes 
and fresh starts await the team. This year's fun and learn- 
ing times have provided the building ground for another 
memorable year in the coming fall of 2011, 



-Kim Kratz 



Sports 

251 



heerleading 




The Tiger cheerleading squad is composed of enthusiastic young 
men and women who help to create a lively and encouraging atmo- 
sphere during Olivet football and basketball games and show support 
to their fellow student athletes. 

Marcie Thompson enjoys being a cheerleader because she feels 
connected with the sports they cheer for. "I love the really intense 
games with all the fans cheering and screaming," she said. "My favorite 
part is when the cheerleaders can get their attention and lead a cheer 
for the team." 

Cheerleading requires constant support and close relationships with 
friends, coaches, and especially other teammates. As Thompson said, 
"The quote 'there is no I in team' plays a huge role when we are try- 
ing to figure out a stunt or work up a new cheer. Our sport relies on 
every team member's best effort and that results in many life lessons." 

-Hannah Pargulskl 




1. The squad cheers on the football team at the fi rst 
game of the season, (s) 2. Nikki Stokell performs during 
half time, (ts) 3. During a women's basketball time-out 
the cheerleaders entertain the crowd, (cb) 4. Syd- 
ney Bland cheers on the Tigers, (cb) 5. Kenzie Red- 
wine keeps the crowd pumped up. (s) 6. Britfiny York 
stands at attention during the National Anthem, (s) 7. 
Male members of the squad wait for the next routine, 
(s) 8. The girls cheer "D-D-D-Defensel" (cb) 



9. The cheerleaders put up their pom-poms for good luck during a three-throw, (ts) 10. Crystal Knizek 
gets into the routine to keep the crowd cheering, (s) 11. Christina Lindsay shouts, "Here we go Tigers, 
here we go!" (s) 12. During a football game, the squad performs for the crowd, (s) 13. The squad knows 
how to keep the momentum going, (s) 14. Cheerleaders yell as the Tiger football team makes a great 
tackle, (s) 15. Jaimie Teske roots for the lady Tigers' basketball team, (cb) 16. The 2010-2011 cheerleaders 
know how to keep the teams motivated. 




Sports 

253 



^■■■■^■■■■■iHHMHnBmnnMHnRMPnMBBn 








1. Eugene Burndam and Michael Da Silva fag 
team, (cb) 2. John Nardozzi moves the ball 
toward the goal, (cl) 3. Jakub Gerlach Kicks 
his way around his defender, (cl) 4. Seth Ar- 
riaga prepares to score, (cl) 5. Toby the Ti- 
ger makes an appearance in the stands, (cb) 
6. Chris Mast passes the ball to Raphael Cor- 
rea. (cl) 7. Seth Arriaga and Raphael Correa are 
all about teamwork, (cl) 8. The Olivet team 
gives each other a hand, (cb) 9. The 2010- 
2011 Men's Soccer Team, (s) 



m 



10. John Nardozzi helps his teammate, (cb) 11. Nigel Dillard fl ghts for possession of the ball, 
(cb) 12. Chris Mast makes his way toward the goal, (cl) 13. Chris Mast and Seth Arriaga work together, 
(cl) 14. Joel Kline and Nigel Dillard wait on the field, (cb) 15. Seth Arriaga prepares to score, (cl) 16. Raphael 
Correa works his way up the field, (cb) 17. Raphael Correa fries to save the ball, (cl) 





One unique aspect that drives the Men's 
Soccer team is that the program is centered 
on the phrase "We Not Me." As Head Coach 
Justin Crew stated, "I spend a lot of time and 
energy trying to develop a culture based on 
us being a family." He gives the team a daily 
quote that reflects the importance of work- 
ing together. Student Chris Mast can relate 
to this theme: "Above all, I am extremely 
thankful for the relationships I have been able 
to develop." Practicing teamwork resulted in 
a placement of third in conference and a re- 
cord of 12-6-1. 

-Hannah Pargulski 



Sports 

255 




The women's soccer team went further this year than 
they ever have in Olivet's history. "We wanted to take it to 
the next level this year. We had to get over the fear of the 
unknown," Senior Brittany Hengesh said. 

Despite losing three of their fi rst four games, the team 
didn't lose sight of their goal. "We dropped a couple of close 
games early on, but I think it made us better," said Coach Bill 
Bahr. 

That was put to the test in the Chicagoland Collegiate 
Athletic Conference Championship against Robert Morris 
University. "It was one of those moments that you only see 
on TV- you never think something that good will ever hap- 
pen to you, it was exhilarating" Hengesh said. 

Having earned their golden ticket to nationals, the team 
then faced a challenge in their first game against Hastings 
College. 

Although disappointed with their fi nish, the women's soc- 
cer team exceeded precedents and expectations, laying a 
fi rm foundation for future seasons of success. 

-Staci Bradbury 



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1. Kelsey Warp is one of many women's soccer team members who 
volunteers with the campus ministry Best Buddies, (ch) 2. Jessica Jones 
braves physical contact to get the ball, (ch) 3. Jordan Wallek speeds 
past front of her opponent, (ch ) 4. Part of soccer is anticipating where 
the ball where go. as Katherine Kulchar understands, (ch) 5. Liz Golle 
ability to diffuse her opponents help her to outplay them, (ch) 6. A 
good throw in requires the ball to stay in front of the head, as Darcy 
King prepares to demonstrate, (ch) 7. Darcy King and Janel Schmitt 
challenge for the soccer ball, (ch) 8. "We had a close team," Coach Bahr 
said about the 2010-2011 Women's Soccer team, (s) 



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9. Kelsey W/arp sprints to the ball, (ch) 10. 
Meghan Pipal is a sophomore mid-fielder, (ch) 
11. Darcy King and Katie Dirkse team up to 
protect possession, (ch) 12. Devin Johnston 
detends fi ercely. (ch) 13. Despite muddy bat- 
tlescars, Rachel Kilbry continues to chal- 
lenge, (ch) 14. Kathenne Kulchar finished her 
final season at Olivet, (ch) 15. Toby the Ti- 
ger cheered the ladies on and riled up tans at 
their home games, (ch) 16. Brittany Hengesh 
beats out an opponent to head the ball to 
safety, (ch) 



Sports 

257 



^ 





This year the Men's golf team emphasized building rela- 
tionship and unity. Though some players had been on the 
team for years, most of them are underclassmen. Fresh- 
man Doug Vroegh commented with this, "Our team's 
greatest strength is unity and how good of friends we 
are with each other." 

The team may not have gotten fi rst in their fall semes- 
ter events, but they never gdve up and they gave their all. 
They kept a Christ-like attitude and continued to stay fo- 
cused and encourage one another throughout the season. 
Their best game was at University of Francis where they 
finished 7th out of 23 teams. 

-Staci Bradbury 




1. Andrew Woodhull concentrates on getting it in the hole, (mr) 2 
Aaron Miles walks away proud of making par. (mr) 3. Bradley Gia- 
malua gets eye level to set the ball, (mr) 4. Bradley Giamalua mark: 
his ball, (mr) 5. Matt Krajec pulls out his favorite putter for his nex, 
shot, (mr) 6. Matt Compton sinks the ball in one putt, (mr) 7. Mat 
Krajec checks to see how much force to put into his next putt, (mr 
8. The 2010-2011 Men's Golf Team, (s) 




9. Austin Mounts swings for a hole in one. 
(mr) 10. Doug Vroegh focuses on mak- 
ing par. (mr) 11. Aaron Miles makes a great 
starting swing, (mr) 12. Doug Vroegh tries 
for his perfect shot, (mr) 13. Doug Vroegh 
gets lower to line up to the hole, (mr) 14. 
Matt Compton lines up his shot for par. 
(ch). 15. Matt Krajec puts the ball on the 
green, (ch) 16. Aaron Miles drives the ball 
out of the weeds, (ch) 




■ ^QHK 




Sports 

259 



IT 



mens 




Despite a difficult beginning of the season, 
the members of Women's Golf persevered to- 
gether as a team and had incredible moments 
of growth in their faith and friendships. 

For sophomore Whitney Sw/ick, one of the 
rewards of playing golf is the opportunity to 
develop supportive relationships with the oth- 
er golfers. "You put a lot of trust in your team- 
mates and opponents." she said. Swick is pas- 
sionate about golf and she has improved her 
game and shot under 100 on 18 holes during a 
tournament and feels driven to become more 
consistent with her golfing skills. She noted. 
"If helped remind me that I can do this if I just 
continue to relax and put my faith, trust, and 
worries in God's hands." 

As Swick stated about the Women's Golf 
team, "I believe we will continue to do the best 
we can and put all of our trust in God the make 
each meet a blessing in our life no matter the 
outcomel" 

-Hannah Pargulski 




1. Libby Walker drives the ball on the first tee at the conference champion- 
ship, (mr) 2. Jordan Grambush concentrates on her swing, (mr) 3. The golf 
team members have new golf bags to carry their clubs, (mr) 4. Ashley Miller 
follows through on her fairway shot, (mr) 5. Hannah Rowen knows precision 
is essential on the golf course, (mr) 6. Ashley Dinneweth lines up to drive the 
ball to the green, (mr) 7. Libby Walker prepares to tee off. (mr) 8. The 2010- 
2011 Women's Golf Team, (s) 



F 





■i IS 






9. Libby Walker swings for par. (mr) 10. Jor- 
dan Grambush drives the ball down the fair- 
way, (mr) 11. Ashley Dinneweth concentrates 
on her stance, (mr) 12. Taylor Smith practic- 
es putting before the match, (mr) 13. Ashley 
Dinneweth watches her ball after driving 
towards the hole, (mr) 14. Jordan Grambush 
putts for par. (mr) 15. W/hitney Swick lines 
up her shot, (mr) 16. Ashley Dinneweth and 
Coach Bill Johnson discuss the course, (mr) 



Sports 

261 




Olivet Men's Tennis came alive this season as they reached new heights 
in their success as a team. The Tigers won three NAIA Region III- VII Cham- 
pionships and made an appearance in three NAIA National Tournaments, 
moving themselves into the region's most successful team bracket. 

Last year, senior Hugo Monya was able to make it into the National 
Tournament in Mobile, Alabama. Hugo has played tennis at Olivet for all 
four years of his college career and during this time he earned NCCAA 
Singles First Team All-American and he proceeded to add Doubles Ail- 
American to his list of accomplishments. Hugo maintains a singles record 
of 31-10 and a doubles at 31-16. Men like Hugo Moriya continue to shine as 
the team improves as individuals and as a whole. 

Titles, awards, accolades continue to pile up as Olivet Men's Tennis 
swings their rackets for success in all areas. The team looks back on this 
year on a positive note and are looking forward to all the achievements 
that are to come for next season. 

-Kim Kratz 




1. Julian Kurz serves the ball to start off the match, 
(s) 2. Sebastian Esquetini returns the serve over 
the net. (s) 3. The 2010-2011 Men's Tennis team, 
(s) 4. Landon Williams retrieves a powerful serve 
with ease, (s) 5. Landon Williams focuses dur- 
ing the match, (s) 6. Sebastian Esquetini slams the 
serve over to his opponent, (s) 7. Landon Williams 
is ready for the opposing player's next move, (s) 8. 
Hugo Moriya serves the ball over for the winning 
point, (s) 






9. Josue Sanchez uses all his power to send the ball to the opponent, (s) 10. Landon Williams uses his back-hand, (s) 11. Hugo 
Moriya awaits the next play, (s) 12. During practice. Sebastian Esquetini perfects his technique, (s) 13. Julian Kurz swings with all 
his might, (s) 14. Josue Sanchez and Diego Gonsalvez congratulate each other after winning a match, (s) 15. Josue Sanchez sends 
the serve over, (s) 16. Julian Kurz practices his serve, (s) 17. Julian Kurz stretches to save the ball from going out of bounds, (s) 18. 
Julian Kurz and Landon Williams warm up before the game, (s) 19. Sebastian Esquetini retrieves the ball, (s) 




^H|||^^HM^^BHBaM||^HaHM|HHBH||||^H|H 





Meagan Ramsay follows through on her serve, (s) 2. Ashlan Allison warms 
up before a match, (s) 3. Lindsey Peterson Keeps her eye on the ball, (s) 4. 
Erica Engelbrecht sends the ball soaring over the net. (s) 5. Alicia Cullen pre- 
pares to retrieve the serve, (s) 6. Taylor Stephens uses all her might while 
serving, (s) 7. Team members pray before the match begins, (s) 8. The girls 
wait to hear what court they will be playing on. (s) 9. Caitlin Dodge waits for 
a serve during practice, (s) 10. Lindsey Peterson smacks the ball back over. 
(s) 11. Erica Engelbrecht saves the ball from going out of bounds, (s) 



Looking at the specific spot you want the ball to hit, 
setting the force behind the swing of your racket and 
measuring the strength flowing from your arm as you 
serve. This is the world of tennis; precision and passion. 
Taylor Stephens, a sophomore, encompasses the drive 
and dedication necessary to win in this sport. 

Having played for twelve years on a competitive 
level Taylor understands the requirements and underlay 
of tennis. "I didn't plan on playing college until high 
school when it became a reality that I could," Taylor 
explained. "You never think you're good enough to play 
at the college level but then a coach contacts you and 
it becomes real." Taylor's success this year has also 
gone above and beyond. Last May, Taylor came back to 
achieve an unexpected win in both her fi rst and second 
matches at Nationals. With workouts two hours a day 
and an hour spent conditioning off the court, the odds 
are in her favor to do well again this year. 

Olivet can expect great things from Taylor as she 
continues her tennis career for the remainder of her 
college experience. Til play all four years here and then 
probably play for fun," Taylor remarks on her future in 
tennis. "Hopefully I can coach a high school team in the 
future." 

-Kim Kratz 






12. Erica Engelbrecht serves the ball over for the final play of the match, (s) 13. Meagan Ramsay watches her opponent's every 
move, (s) 14. Alicia Cullen practices her back-hand, (s) 15. Meagan Ramsay and Lindsey Peterson are all smiles during practice, (s) 
16. Lindsey Peterson gets ready for the match to begin, (s) 17. Ashlan Allison is cheered on by her teammates as she begins the 
match, (s) 18. Aziza Butoyi is ready to serve, (s) 19. The 2010-2011 Women's Tennis team, (s) 




Sports 

265 



- 



■■■■■■■■■■■■■■^■■■■■■^■i 



ens 






The 2010-2011 Women's Volleyball Team, 
s) 2. Molly Goldbach goes for a back row at- 
tack, (ch) 3. Dee Ann Garvin gets down low to 
dig the ball back up. (mr) 4. Lauren Comfort 
smacks out a serve, (ch) 5. Sara Byrne and 
Rachel Raynor double team on a block, (mr) 
6. Terse Byrne slams a serve over the net for 
an ace. (mr) 7. The team huddles after an in- 
tense match, (mr) 8. The team lines up to be 
announced before the fl rsf match starts, (mr) 

9. Sara Byrne lets nothing over the net. (mr) 

10. Katherine Hozian digs up the ball before it 
hits the floor, (mr) 



This was a successful year for the ladies on the Tiger Volleyball team. The team defended the prestigious title 
of Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference (CCAC) Tournament Champions. Tara Schmidt, Athlete of the Week 
and winner of All Conference First Team for 3 years, says: "We are very close as a team and used our friendships to 
help us enjoy the season as much as we could. This season I learned that volleyball, although it has consumed my 
life for as long as I can remember, is just a game that will eventually end." Tara reflected on the season, giving one 
last comment. "It's the friendships that I've developed (as cheesy as it sounds) that will last a lifetime." 

-Kim Kratz 







11. The Lady Tigers do their pre-game ritual for good luck, (mr) 12. 
Sara Byrne performs a back row attack as Lauren Comfort covers her. 
(mr) 13. Seniors Sara Byrne and Tara Schmidt defend the net. (ch) 



Sports 

267 




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1. Matt Mitchell looks to make a pass down the lane, (ts) 2. Antonio Marshall takes a 
wide open shot, (ts) 3. The Tigers get pumped up before the start of a home game, 
(ts) 4. A few players get a quick rest before heading back into the game, (ts) 5. Nick 
Klomstad looks down the lane for an open teammate, (ts) 6. Ben Worner lays the ball 
in for a sweet two points, (ts) 7. Coach Hodge gives the team a pep talk during a time 
out. (ts) 8. Chuck Rideout. Cory Hainlen. and Brandon Streets defend the basket, (ts) 



The men's basketball team at Olivet had a 
great 2010-2011 season. In the words of Anto- 
nio Marshall. "As a young team it took us a while 
to understand and learn our roles. We have had a 
lot of guys step up this year." Their success was 
due in large part to the leadership of their veteran 
players. 

The Tigers began the season with a Home- 
coming win over their sister school Point Loma 
Nazarene University. They later had the opportu- 
nity to go play a NCAA Division II team in Hawaii 
over Christmas break and emerged with a vic- 
tory. Yet another team highlight came in Febru- 
ary when they defeated Chicago State, an NCAA 
Division I team. Several players have progressed 
this year as well. Point guard Antonio Marshall tied 
the record for the most three point shots in one 
game with 7, and Cory Hainlen reached the 1,000 
point mark in the Chicago State win. 

The team's individual progress contributed to 
their overall success, and the season provided the 
foundation for a great team yet again next year. 

-Allyson Vrabel 



9. Antonio Marshall takes the ball right around his defender, (ts) 10. Cory Hainlen looks for an open lane to the basket, (ts) 11. Matt 
Mitchell takes a shot from downtown, (ts) 12. Brandon Streets stuffs his opponent, (ts) 13. Nick Klomstad goes up for a jumper, 
(ts) 14. Brandon Streets begins the game with a tip to his fellow teammate, (ts) 15. Nick Klomstad steps out for a quick pass, (ts) 
16. The 2010-2011 ONU Men's Basketball team, (s) 







Sports 






- -■--■ ■•■ ■ 




KGTD3 





1. Danielle Pipal saves the ball from going out-of-bounds, (ch) 2. Lexie Hei- 
nold takes a shot from behind the three-point arch, (ch) 3. Rachel Kearney and 
Miranda Geever fight to get a rebound, (ch) 4. Jaimie Buckman shoots a three 
pointer, (ch) 5. Devin Johnston plays aggressive defense, (ch) 6. Rachel Kearney 
guards the out-of-bounds play, (ch) 7. Holly Schacht takes a jumpshot over the 
defense, (ch) 8. Denita Phelps and Liz Bart trap an opponent in the corner, (ch) 



"This was the best season of my life," senior Simo- 
ne Coburn said about the women's basketball team. 
"We crushed records and made history." 

Coach Porter described them as the most hard- 
working team he had ever had: "Breaking the wom- 
en's basketball record of nineteen 100 point games 
in a season, beating NAIA Division II power Morning- 
side College by 45 points, and almost defeating #1 
nationally-ranked Union University were some of the 
highlights of the season." After minor injuries and ill- 
nesses clouded the beginning of the season, the team 
pulled together. Coburn explained, "The team concept 
caught on fast, and we learned that we had to give it 
our all no matter who or where we are playing." 



Coach Porter helped the team to ingest that les- 
son. "He has a great heart and he makes it easy for us 
to be coachable, while at the same time not letting 
us fall below expectations," Coburn said. However, 
over all of the records laying shattered in pieces; and 
all the victories, including the thirteen game winning 
streak as well as the undefeated trip to Hawaii. Being 
ranked- shines the fundamental attitude of the team, 
as summed up by Coburn: "We are blessed to be 
playing this game." 

-Staci Bradbury 



9. Danielle Tolbert stated that this year's season as "one of the best."- (ch) 10. Taylor Haymes speeds around the defense, (ch) 
11. Simone Coburn charges to the lane, (ch) 12. Simone Coburn catches the ball on a break-away, (ch) 13. Lisa Beyer keeps the 
ball away from her opponent, (ch) 14. Devin Johnston gets in a defensive stance, (ch) 15. Rachel Kearney uses her height to her 
advantage on defense, (ch) 16. Coach Porter called the 2010-2011 team the most hardworking group he's ever had. (s) 





Ah, youngsters. Fresh, fi erce, fi ckle, fun, befuddled...the list could go on. New blood in the form of freshmen is pumping through 
the spring sports teams, and hopefully the revitalizafion will lead to leaps and bounds in victories. "This year we have a team that 
is bigger than any track team has ever been, and so we're really young, "explains junior track team member Thomas Powers. "Size 
is a very important step for a team that wants to do well, because it lets us recruit good athletes, but it also lets us compete at a 
higher level." 

The Tiger baseball team experienced a major influx of players. Senior Christopher Hammet explains, "We are a very young team 
this year, so it is very important that we have our younger guys step up. In previous years, we have had multiple seniors to help lead 
the team. This year we only have two, so if is going to be very important that everyone steps up to the leadership position." 

Women's soffPall also faced the challenge of bringing fresh faces info the fold. As Powers puts it, "I love the sense of family we 
have when we are together no matter if we are training or hanging out." Creating the team off the field will be as important for the 
spring sports teams as what happens on if. 



Staci Bradbury 







■JL 




The 2010-2011 Men's Baseball team bonded both on and off the field, (s) 2. The Women's Softball team had a sucessful season, (s) 3. 
le Men's Track team sent multiple runners to nationals this season, (s) 4. The Women's Track team is full of dedicated athletes, (s) 

Sports 



273 



pp—wwi . i m. m i .m. nn i i i u 



^^1HBHHHB^HHHHH^^^^HHHHHHHHHMHI^^^HHHHHHBIIV^ : 




Intramurals are a wonderful way for sfudenfs fo gef involved in 
a sporfs feam wifh their friends. The Olivet students who partici- 
pate in intramurals are able to have fun, while competing with one 
another. Erica Englebrecht says, "I like intramurals because of the 
fun competition as well as for the variety of sporfs offered." 

Olivet offers various intramural sports teams such as flag 
football, basketball, volleyball, and indoor soccer. This year, the 
school also added lighting to Fort in Villa fi eld to allow for outdoor 
soccer, ultimate fnsbee and flag football at night. This provides 
an opportunity for all students to gef involved In their favorite 
intramural sports. Kevin Greene says that he enjoys intramurals 
because "it's a nice break from normal life. I get fo enjoy time 
with friends and have fun playing together!" 

Senior Derek Berquist sums it up by saying, "Intramurals are 
intensel" 

-Allyson Vrabel and Kayla Koury 




1. Brandon Klemm loosens up his arm before a frisbee match, (ch) 2. 
Cole Jensen shoots the winning basket, (mr) 3. Lance Hays tosses 
the frisbee to his teammate, (ch) 4. Sand volleyball referees wait 
for players to arrive to the courts, (kb) 5. Students await the snap 
on the fourth down, (ch) 6. Garrett Sevigny Keeps his eye on the 
basket, (mr) 7. The guys get ready for the snap during flag foot- 
ball, (ch) 8. Students start the basketball game with a tip-off. (mr) 



9. Tyler Hamilton looks for an open teammate, (ch) 10. Matt Pioch blocks the shot. (mr). 11. Colton Moore catches the pass with 
ease, (ch) 12. Cameron Dunlop enjoys being a referee for intramurals. (kb) 13. Mark Bundy breezes past a defender, (ch) 14. Cole 
Jensen guards his opponent from driving to the hoop, (mr) 15. Morgan Radzimanowski sends the fnsbee fl ying. (ch) 16. Despite 
cold October temperatures these students enjoy a competitive game of sand volleyball at Fortin Villa, (kb) 




Sports 

275 



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Sparta Church of the Nazarene 




665 Thirteen Mile Road 
Sparta, Ml 49345 

616-887-1169 



Josh Patter 
Benjamin Strait 
Bethany Chatman 
Not Pictured: 
NickKellar 




Roxana 

Church 

of the 

Nazarene 



Connecting 
(Peovfe 
With 
Jesus 



Roxana Church of the Nazarene Est. 1925 

500 N Central Ave. 

618-254-4026 

www.roxannanaz.com 

Dr. Lawrence A. Lacher, Pastor 






Wisconsin District 

Catching the Vision of Holiness... 
One Student at a Time 




Congratualtions to our Wisconsin District 

Olivetians! 

Rev. & Mrs. Deri Keefer 
District Advisory Board 
Your Wisconsin Family 






We celebrate a long and close relationship with ONU. 
We are proud of our students! 



Laura Benda 
Jacob Boyce 
Caitlin Charles 
Sarah Cook 
Nicole DeVries 
Corrie Everson 
Ashley Goad 
Dana Hopkins 
Rachel Howe 





Samantha Krestel 
Kayla Layman 
Jef Maslan 
Ashley McLaughlin 
Amanda Price 
John Rachan 
Steve Rachan 
Drew Silver 
David Timm 



Chicago First Church of the Nazarene 
Rev. Kevin M. Ulmet, Senior Pastor 

12725 Bell Road, Lemont IL 60439 * 708-349-0454 x www.chicagofirstnaz.org 




let 




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Htfjn* 1 



Dr. James Spruce 



District Superintendent 
District Advisory Board 

Mrs. Phyllis German Mr. Galen Scammahorn 

Mr. Christopher Shotts Mr. Jerome Williams 

Rev. Michael E. Curtis Rev. Kevin Donoho 



Rev. Allen J. Ebbler 



Rev. Jim Frye 



Michigan 2> nth let 

GlifiLctina &»#intkh in ftt wohM . . . »«« itaiintata time 



Micfrifian 3)ikthict0#iu<itiank! 



2H. Q-»r>n oeama/i 
3)nthic.t~^A(#uikoh CB&ahJl 




AJottnetn MlcnLcr<zn T/bttLct 



— — -r • '• 



Together . . . with a New Vision! 




We are so proud of our students 
attending Olivet Nazarene 
University and pray for them as 
they prepare for their future. 

Wayne H. Brown 
District Superindtendent 

ONU Trustees 

Northern Michigan District 



Left to Right: David Brantley, Jill Rice, Dr. Wayne H. Brown 






F\ret Church of the Uazarene 

Anderson, Indiana 
Gary L Cable, YaeX-ov 







Congratulation Ciaee of 20 1 1 ! 



Chapman Memorial 
Church of the Hazarene 



The worth of our students . . . 
Priceless! 



7520 E."U" Ave. Vicksburg, 
Michigan 49097 

269-649-2392 





ortheastern 














1 



Congratulations to our 201 1 NEI Graduates! 



Thank you to Dr. John Bowling, 
and all the faculty and administrators of ONU 

for a job well done! 

ONU Trustees- District Superintendent Dr. David G. Roland 
Dr. Philip C. Rogers, Rev. Lane Fosnaugh, Rev. Gary Cable, Gene Snowden, 

Darcie Dill, and Mark Bennett 



Owosso (Zhurch of the f\jazarczncz 

1865 South M-52 

Owosso, Ml 48867 

989.723.2229 

Email: office@owossonazarene.org 

www.OwossoNazarene.org 




v / 



o 



L 



ii 









Congratulations on Graduation, 

Meagan Olds! 
Your church family is so proud of youl 

Rodger De Vote , Lead Pastor 

Marlene Webster, Family Pastor 

Murphy GUI, Worship Arts Pastor 

Michael Watson, Student life Pastor 



inn 1 



Congratulations 
Ryan Lingle! 



South Bend First 
Church of the Nazarene 

51690 NIronwoodRd. 
South Bend, Indiana 46635 

office @ southbendfirst. org 
phone: 574-272-6466 



fAur 



SOUTH BEND FIRST 
CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 



h&evwm* ~thc Ivnqesi^wrvf ol Meet on ~TA& tuxvifo> c**mI Owe& oi 'f'rfi.&lvicvri.c*. 







A 

Abbott. Bethany 69 
Abbott. Melody 83. 175. 242. 
Abner. Sarah 107 
Abogunrin, Oluw/ayonda 107 
Ackerman, Nicole 107 
Acosta. Andrew 107 
Addington, Bethany 83 
Addington. Paul 51 
Adewole. Kareem 107 
Agers, Somone 107 
Aguilar, Luis 69 
Akre. Samantha 83 
Alberico. Alyssa 83 
Albenco, Ryne 107 
Albring, Autumn 173 
Alcantar. Jose 107 
Alcorn. Cameron 107 
Alexander, Laura 83 
Alexander. Michael 69 
Allen. Anthony 5.30.31 
Allen. David 51 
Allen. Samantha 51,191 
Allen, Shelby 83, 155 
Allison. Ashlan 83, 264, 265 
Allison, Brandon 107 
Allison, Hannah 107 
Alt, Alyssa 107 
Ambrosia, Justin 107 
Andecover, Cierra 83 
Andersen. Amber 107 
Anderson, Allison 107 
Anderson, Artika 83 
Anderson, Brett 107 
Anderson. David 13, 50, 51 
Anderson. Jaymie 51 
Anderson. Jennifer 69 
Anderson. Kristen 51 
Anderson. Lauren 106, 107 
Anderson. Molly 69 
Armstrong. Zachary 51 
Arnold, Emily 107 
Arntson, Martha 83, 223 
Arriaga. Seth 254.255 
Ashley. Amanda 51 
Atadja, Rivka 107 
Athialy, Seth 20,69 
Athg, Kristin 107 
Atwater. Anne 83 
Atwood. Jeremy 107. 240 
Austin, Lacey 107 



B 



Bach, Christian 69 
Bachelor, Jessica 107 



Badagliacco, Joseph 83 

Bader, Jonathan 107 

Bag, All 51, 64, 65, 209, 226 

Bailey, Kaitlin 176 

Baker, Andrew 51 

Baker, Jason 107 

Baker. Zachary 69. 204 

Bakr, Junaid 107 

Baldwin, Bethany 51 

Balster, Amber 51 

Bambnck. Breanne 107, 189 

Banashak. Alice 51 

Banker, Douglas 69 

Barkley, Michael 69 

Barnard, Andrew 107 

Barnard, Brandon 107 

Barnes, Bradlee 51 

Barnes, Elisabeth 69 

Barrigear, Seth 107 

Barse, Jacob 14, 51, 65 

Bart. Elizabeth 108.270 

Barth. William 108 

Basham, Sebastiana 83. 221 

Bassford, Lynnette 108 

Bafkiewicz, Jason 51 

Battershell, Shannon 18. 51. 64, 188 

Bauer, Kassandra 83. 143 

Bauler, Lezlie 108 

Beatty, Lauren 32,83 

Beaty, Paul 51.198 

Beck. Ayns 108 

Beckham, Steven 108 

Begick. Natalie 69 

Behal, Heidi 34,69.193 

Beiler. Jami 83 

Bell. Amy 51 

Bellamy. Brooke 108 

Bell. Christy 51 

Beiler, Anelle 141 

Bellamy. Kristen 51 

Benda, Laura 69 

Bennett, GregoryElijah 212 

Bennett, Matthew 108 

Bennett, Micah 69.222 

Benoit, Adrien 51 

Bentle, Abigail 24, 25, 51, 216 

Berg, Josiah 221 

Berg, Natalie 51 

Bergren, Jordan 35, 68, 69, 134, 135, 153, 

Berka. Sarah 108 

Bernardoni, William 51 

Bernhardt, Caleb 83 

Berquist, Derek 51 

Berry, Brennen 108 

Berry, Eboni 69 

Bertolozzi, Natilee 146, 147, 178 

Betancourt, Eliseo 108, 222 



187 



Betzer, Trynity 51 

Bevan, Todd 108 

Beville. Kelsea 34.83 

Beyer, Lisa 51, 271 

Biddison, Daniel 51 

Biddle, April 108 

Birth. Amanda 51,157 

Bisaillon, David 51 

Bishop, Michael 16,69 

Bishop, Zachary 83. 221 

Bissonette. Kayla 83 

Blakeley, Kaitlyn 84 

Blake, Timothy 84 

Bland, Sydney 108,252 

Blaney, Joseph 35. 84 

Blanton, Emily 84 

Blough, Owen 17,235 

Blucker, Erin 51,219 

Blunier, Lauren 69, 224 

Boardman, Abby 217 

Boaz, Lisa 108,151 

Bodner, Sarah 84 

Boie, Zachary 51 

Bolander. Danielle 84, 143 

Bond, Jordan 84.156 

Bonilla. Elizabeth 51 

Booker, Kafhryn 69 

Booker, Michelle 84.142 

Borger, Emily 35, 108 

Borland, Abigail 84 

Borton, Andrea 52 

Boss, Jacob 5. 52 

Bottan, Christopher 108 

Bott, Elizabeth 84 

Bower, Jeremiah 52 

Bowman, Grace 69, 153 

Boyce, Jacob 84 

Boynton, Kathleen 84 

Bradbury, Staci 20, 24, 108, 134, 139, 140, 142, 145, 
149. 152, 157, 191, 194, 195, 204, 205, 209, 
212, 213, 223, 234, 238, 239, 240, 256, 258, 
270, 272 

Brainard, Cassandra 84, 190 

Brandes, Antonette 108 

Brause, David 19 

Breeden, Richard 108 

Brenner, Dwighf 52 

Breuker, Anouk 108 

Breunig, Melanie 108 

Brewer, Hannah 108 

Brewer, Molly 52 

Bridgewater. Kourtney 108 

Brink, John 84 

Brinson, Corey 172 

Britt, Jordan 108 

Brockman, Kaitlyn 108 

Brooks, Brent 12, 69, 178, 194 



•own. Chelsey 52 
'owning. Madeline 84 
■own. Jessica 52 
-own. Jessica (3) 33. 52 
-own. Kelli 84 
uce. Wade 52. 222 
ruenning. Stephanie 108 
rummerstedt. Sarah 69 
uner. Joshua 108 
cyan. Titus 108 
uchanan, Aaron 84 
Mckholt. Brandy 108 
uckman. Jaimie 69. 270 
ultema. Katherme 84 
undy. Alyson 52 
indy. Mark 275 
urch. Ethan 84.138 
urch. Isaac 52. 239 
urchfi eld. Jamison 109 
■urger. Brendan 109 
urgett. Danielle 109 
lurgoyne. Ashley 52 
lurndam. Eugene 109. 254 
lurneson. Jessica 70 
urrington. Andrew 109 
urns. Landon 84 
wrsztynsky. Natalie 85 
rurt. Ashley 70 
iuseth. Melissa 85 
usler. Rebecca 109.151 
us. Olivia 85 
utler. Andrew 70 
utoyi. Aziza 265 
.utton. Kayla 52.204 
lyrne. Sara 52. 266. 267 
yrne. Terese 70. 266 
iyrom. Jacob 70 



c 



!able. Jonathan 85 
Jable.Kendra 2.85 
"abrera. Clinton 85. 163 
laldwell. Emily 85 
Caldwell. Jacob 85 
talhoun. Adrian 109 
Camden. Ashley 85 
Campbell. Blake 52 
Campbell. Hannah 109 
Campbell. Rachel 52 
Campbell. Tyler 52 
Campollo. Leizel 70 
Canales. Esteban 52 
Cannon. Keri 20. 52 
Cantrall. Karissa 85 
Carey. Kelly 85 
Carey. William 109 



Carlisle. Eric 85 

Carlson. Anna 223 

Carlson. Julie 85 

Carlson, Kaitlin 109 

Carlson, Sara 85 

Carlton. Megan 52 

Carman, Caleb 70 

Carman. Rachel 109 

Carmouche. Brett 52 

Carpenter, Cameron 109 

Carr, Caleb 109 

Carr. Casandra 52 

Carngan. Daniel 109 

Carroll, Jordan 109 

Carstens, Jordan 85 

Carter, Alicia 5, 32, 33, 70 236 

Carter, Michael 109 

Cary, Tyler 109 

Casey, Clinton 52, 64. 65, 221 

Casillas. Kelly 109 

Casten. Kyle 109 

Castleman, Kelsey 109 

Caswell, Alyssa 109 

Cataldo. Zachary 109 

Caudle. Elizabeth 52 

Caven. Christine 2. 109 

Cavender, Faith 109 

Cawvey, Ryan 85 

Cervantes. Aivon 52 

Chambers. Alyssa 109 

Chambless, Katlynn 109. 193 

Chamness. Emily 70 

Charles, Caitlin 52. 227 

Charles, Lauren 52 

Chatman, Bethany 109. 278 

Cheatham. Olivia 85 

Cheek, Bruce 202 

Cheeseman. Emily 28 

Cheney. Kristin 52 

Chenoweth, Alyssa 52 

Chenoweth, Lindsay 109 

Cherney, Benjamin 85. 175 

Christensen. John 68, 70. 196 

Christiansen, Andrew 109 

Church, Kaylie 85 

Ciganek. Lauren 70, 147 

Clark. Andrew 52. 65. 166, 211 

Clark. Samantha 86 

Clausing, Dana 70, 171 

Close, Lindsay 52 

Cloutier. Lauren 86, 138 

Cobb, Michael 18,52 

Coburn, Simone 52. 190, 270, 271 

Cochran, Sarah 109 

Cohagan. Chase 86 

Cohea. Jessica 52, 186, 195 

Coker.Jamila 110.153 



Cole, Emily 110 

Collier, Anthony 52 

Collins, Cassandra 86 

Colon, Jessie 52 

Combes, Michael 53 

Comfort, Lauren 70, 266. 267 

Compton, Kendra 53 

Compton, Matthew 13, 53, 258. 259 

Compton, Rebecca 86 

Condreay, Sarah 86 

Cornell. Ayla 110 

Connolley, Stephanie 110 

Conzen, Paul 50.53,212 

Cook. Courtney 110 

Cook, Elizabeth 70 

Cook, Jocelyn 110, 166 

Cook. Jordan 70 

Cook, Sarah 86.145 

Coombs, Lyndsay 70 

Cooper, Shawnn 86 

Coots, Ben j amen 53 

Copley, Bethany 53 

Cordle, Aaron 53 

Corfl ts, Alaina 53 

Cornish, Christian 68, 70 

Correa, Raphael 53, 254, 255 

Coser, Katlyn 110 

Cota Vargas, Evelyn 53 

Coulman, Jonathan 86 

Counts, Elizabeth 110 

Cousins, Kellee 86 

Cowen, Andrew 110 

Cox, Alexandra 86 

Cox, Clarissa 86, 187, 139 

Cramer, Alyssa 53, 194 

Cramer, Jordan 53 

Crawley, Dale 70 

Crofoot, Rebecca 110 

Crookshanks, Jenna 110 

Crowder. Abigail 110 

Crowder, Hannah 86 

Crowley, Joshua 53 

Crum, Caitlyn 20,70,142 

Cruz, Jose 36, 229 

Oyer. Courtney 134. 232 

Cullen. Alicia 264. 265 

Culver, April 70. 142. 223 

Culver, Philip 53 

Curtis, Brandi 110 

C //ayna. Megan 110 



Index 

287 






Czyzniejewski. Krisfy 86. 165 

D 

Daer. Cassandra 35. 86 
Dafgard, Benjamin 110 
Dahl. John 106.110 
Dahlquisf, Taryn 110 
Dahl. Ryan 53 
Dale. Mitchell 110 
Dampf. Joshua 70 
Damptz. Traci 53 
Damron. Jonathan 110 
Dana. Claire 110 
Daniels, Melanie 53 
Darden. Randall 53 
Da Silva. Michael 254 
Davenport, Kayla 232 
Davenport. Keilyn 53 
Davenport. Matthew 86 
Davey, Ashton 86 
Davila. Alyssa 110 
Davis, Camille 110 
Davis, Justin 110 
Davis. Kernelle 110 
Davis. Michael 110 
Davis. Reginald 250 
Davis. Sarah 86.223 
Davisson, Jaclyn 53 
Deal. Bradley 86 
Dean. Victoria 110 
Dearth. Brenda 53 
Deaton, Chelsea 70 
Deckard, Joel 87,154 
Dee. Aubrey 70 
DeGroot. Mary 53 
Degutis, Ryan 110 
Delgado, Derek 110 
Del Soldato, Emily 53 
Dempsay, Jenna 110 
Dennis. Drew 111 
Dennis. Matthew 53 
Deputy. Anna 111 
Deramos. Michelle 111 
Desrochers, Ashley 87 
Devme, Elizabeth 24, 53, 188 
Devine, Rachel 111 
DeWees. Alex 111 
DeWees, Tyler 31 
Dexter, Shannon 53 
Dexter, Shelley 111 
De Young. Ryan 53,169 
Dhenmn, April 111,142 
Dickey, Jenna 26, 181, 244 
Dickrell, Nicholas 87, 202 
Dier, Nicole 87 
Dignan, Kellie 111 



Dikeman, Elizabeth 53 

DiLeonardo, Sara 111 

Dillard. Emily 4,31,87 

Dillard. Nigel 255 

Dillman. Amy 87. 196 

Dillman. Jesse 70, 232 

Dillman, Stephanie 15, 111 

Dimick. Connor 87 

Di Monte, Sarah 35, 153. 176 

Dmeen. Kevin 111 

Dinneweth, Ashley 111, 260, 261 

DiRienzo. Juliana 53 

Dirkse, Katie 141. 257 

Dixon. Ethan 71 

Dixon, Kelsey 87 

Dobbs, Christian 111 

Dobeck, Danielle 111 

Dodd. Tyson 15,71.233 

Dodge, Caitlin 53,264 

Dodsworth, Treavor 106, 111 

Doherty, Michael 21, 87, 200, 206, 207 

Domaoal, Rachel 87 

Donaldson. Rae Marie 71. 239 

Doran. Abigail 71 

Dorian. Jensine 111 

Dorsey. Laura 53 

Dowell. Megan 111 

Downey, Shawn 111 

Downs, Katlyn 53, 71 

Doyle, Alexandra 111 

Drace, Paul 33,53 

Drebenstedt, Reagan 176 

Drenth, Ryan 111 

Duffy, Nora 53 

Dumey. Noelle 54 

Duncan, Tnsha 111 

Dunkman, Katelyn 2. 87 

Dunlop, Cameron 54, 196, 275 

Dunwoody, Kelly 54 

Durazo, Sarah 71. 227 

Durkin. Nora 111.166 

Dusing, Stephanie 54 



Eastman, Kyle 111 
Eaton, Olivia 87 
Eby. Heather 178 
Eccles, Jonathan 87 
Eccles, Kathryn 54, 217 
Eckert, Tabitha 54 
Eckstein, James 54 
Eddy, Elizabeth 111.140 
Edens, Stephanie 87 
Edwards, Angela 71 
Edwards, Kenzie 111, 204 
Eggleston, Jordan 54 



Ehlenfeld. Christopher 87 

Eilders, Preston 54 

Eis, Stephanie 71 

Ekhoff, Jordan 54 

Ekhoff, Kaitlam 54 

Ellcessor, Beth 111 

Eller, Melissa 54 

Elless. Matthew 111 

Ellingboe, Kortney 87 

Ellis, Alma 111 

Ellis. Lauren 111 

Ellis, Scott 111 

Elroy, Megan 112 

Emaus, Shane 18. 19, 35, 186 

Emerson. Katelyn 71 

Emmons, Julie 112 

Enderli. Amy 54, 219 

Endrizzi, Hannah 87 

Engbers, Rebekah 71 

Engelbrecht, Erica 54. 64 ,264. 265 

Engel, Erin 54,218,220 

Engel. Kara 88 

Engelland, Bianca 112 

Engelland, Samantha 88 

Engelsen, Jennifer 88 

Erdahl, Jonathan 88 

Erdahl. Lauren 54 

Enckson, Sally 71 

Erickson, Sara 71 

Enckson, Seth 171 

Ernest, Danny 88 

Escalante, Hannah 71, 197 

Escobar, Alejandro 54 

Eskew, Amanda 88 

Eskew, Austin 112 

Espersen, Justine 112 

Esquetini, Andres 88. 262, 263 

Eulert, Nicole 112 

Evans. Alisha 88 

Evans, Chad 88,189 

Evans, Erin 112 

Everson, Corrie 71. 193 

Evins, Natasha 54 

Ewing, Jennifer 112 



Fagerburg, Kelly 88 
Fain, Lucas 88 
Falconer, Chantalle 112 
Farber, Amy 28, 54, 65, 193 
Farris, Kathleen 88 
Farris, Katlyn 88 
Farr, Stephen 202 
Feathersfone, Noah 112 
Felber, Megan 54 
Fellows, Kyle 54 



-'ere. Almaz 71 
: erns. Nathaniel 112 
r ett. Felicia 71 
: iala. Krista 71 
"iehn. Aaron 3 
leld. Christopher 88 
: ieldhouse. Tara 88 
r ields. Jenelle 112 
meld. Benjamin 54 
: ightmaster, Jonathan 112 
: ilbeck. Janel 71 
inley. Matthew 112 
: inney. Lauren 71. 147 
•'ischer. John 54 
: ish. Aimee 112.177 
"isher. Rachel 71 
: isher. Zach 112 
Jack. David 112 
Jary. Felicia 112 
Jeck Crystal 112 
Jeschner. Laura 25, 71. 210. 244 
Jonan. Aaron 88 
Jynn, Katelyn 54 
: oday. Aisha 112 
-'ogwell, Lauren 54, 227 
: oley. Elise 54 
: ord. Jacquelyn 112, 197 
: orshee. Jameson 17, 189 
r osnaugh, Joy 88, 152 
: oster, Elizabeth 54 
r oster, Kayla 88 
: oster, Whitney 71.234 
•'raizer, Nicholas 71 
: rame. Taylin 4, 20, 32, 33, 88 
r rancoeur. Thomas 112 
Franklin, Kevin 112 
ianklin, Roy 54 
Franseen. Megan 112 
f antz. Nathaniel 54 
lazer. Neil 88 
redericks, Sarah 72 
reed. Jackie 112 
Freeman, Melissa 112 
z rench. Ashley 112 
: rench, Tasha 112 
: rey, Tianna 89 
: rias. Kathryn 72 
: rias, Kevin 89 
ritch, McKenzie 89. 187 
rownfelter, Chad 89 
'rye, Cameron 89 
Frye, Marvin 4, 112 
filler, Geoffrey 89 
punches, Antonio 72 
Funston. Hannah 112 
Fuqua, Courtney 54 



G 



Gacutan, Chris 89 

Gaffney. Brittany 20,54 

Gage, Meghan 72 

Gahagen, Andrew 113 

Gaines. Robby 113 

Galloway, Jacob 89 

Gamache. Ronald 113. 205 

Gantner, Francis 72 

Garcia, Benjamin 14, 89 

Garcia, Nicholas 89 

Garcia, Urbano 54 

Gardner. Hannah 113 

Gargiulo, Matthew 89, 177 

Garner, Tanner 113 

Garsf, Rebecca 113 

Garvin. DeeAnn 72. 266 

Garwood, Laura 113 

Garwood, Melissa 72 

Garza, Michael 72 

Gash, Stacey 113 

Gaytan, Gabnelle 113 

Geeding. Benjamin 4, 5. 113. 207. 236, 243 

Geever, Miranda 113,270 

Geever, Nicholas 113 

Gerlach, Jakub 254 

Gersfenberger. Jordan 54. 179 

Gersfung. Stacey 89. 140 

Gerwin, Brad 35, 113 

Ghofra, Reetu 89 

Giamalva. Bradley 113 

Gibson. Alyssa 54, 113, 195 

Gibson, Alyssa (3) 54, 195 

Gibson, Candice 113 

Gibson, Danielle 55 

Giesige, Bryan 55 

Gifford, Ryan 113 

Giles, Rebecca 113 

Gilleylen, Bntfnee 55 

Gilleylen, Kelsee 55 

Gill, Joshua 89, 134, 135, 154. 232 

Gilmore, Rachel 89 

Gmn. Brian 113,147,151 

Ginn. David 19,55 

Glandon, Cassidy 113 

Glendenning, Brena 113 

Glover, Ashley 113 

Glover, Kenton 55 

Goad, Ashley 89 

Goergen, Emily 72 

Goerne. Jill 55 

Goettsch, Carolyn 89 

Goldbach, Molly 72,266 

Golden, Aaron 55 

Golle, Elizabeth 68, 72, 256 

Gomez, Cnstma 113 



Gonsalvez, Diego 89 

Gonzales. Julieanne 55 

Gonzalez. Tara 113 

Goodman. Brittany 113 

Goodman, Rebecca 113 

Goodspeed. Jacob 89 

Goodwin. Michele 113 

Gordon, Mark 113 

Gorman, Emily 55 

Grambush. Jordan 55. 248. 249, 260. 261 

Grayson. Amy 113 

Green. Alexander 225 

Greene. Damn 113 

Greene. Kevin 25. 55. 192. 196. 198 

Green, Jade 90, 155. 168 

Green. Mark 55 

Gregory. Andrea 90 

Gregory, Jacob 90 

Gregory, Julia 114 

Grevis, Jen 114 

Grieder. Anna 114, 172, 189 

Gnffes. Joshua 90.237 

Grigus, Allison 114 

Gnswold. Cole 55 

Grochowski, Sebastian 55 

Groover. Allyse 114.238 

Groters, Rachel 90.144 

Grove. Michelle 114 

Groves, Matthew 55. 191. 210 

Guebert. Gabnelle 90 

Guenseth. Lillian 114 

Guinn, Lana 90 

Guzman. Jorge 55 

H 

Hackman, Jasen 55. 136. 146. 147 
Haenni, Jenna 114 
Hafner, Jessica 114 
Hainlen, Cory 55, 268. 269 
Hall. Ashley 90 
Hall. Erica 55 
Hall, John 114 
Hall, Lauren 114 
Hall, Timothy 55 
Hamilton, Philip 17,55 
Hamilton, Tyler 275 
Hamlet, Lauren 55 
Hammond, Erica 114 
Hamm, Trevor 55 
Hance, Kyle 16.90.241 
Hancock, Shannon 72 



Index 



289 



K 



Handson, Desmond 72. 222 
Hanes. Ashton 90 
Han. Hyebin 114 
Hanley. Kathryn 14.90 
Hannagan. Kathenne 72 
Hansen. Jordan 90. 232 
Hanson. Amanda 55 
Harding. Lanae 104. 105, 114 
Harper. Jessica 32. 90. 134 
Harris. Adrienne 55 
Harris. Brandon 114 
Harris. Danyne 114 
Harris. Lauren 90 
Harris. Marshall 106. 114 
Harrison-Hudson, De'Niece 114 
Harrison. Michael 114 
Harrouff. Martha 72. 105. 178. 226 
Harfman, Rachael 90 
Hasselbring, Luke 114 
Hatalla. Faith 55 
Hathaway. Joy 55 
Hathaway. Lauren 90 
Haun, Crystal 114 
Hausken. Kate 72 
Hausken. Lauren 114. 143 
Hausser, Victoria 216 
Hawkins, Jeffrey 190 
Hay, Emily 72,165.194 
Hayes, Lindsey 90 
Hayes, Ryan 55. 199. 218 
Haymes. Taylor 90, 271 
Hays, Chelsea 90,229 
Hays, Desiree 90. 237 
Hays. Lance 55. 187. 188. 274 
Hazen, Rebekah 72 
Hedge. Jordan 91. 165 
Hedrick, Michael 114 
Hedtcke, Kelly 91 
Height. Jeremy 82. 91, 189. 229 
Heincker, Benjamin 91 
Heinold, Alexandria 270 
Heinz, Emily 106.114 
Heisey. Jessica 55 
Heldt, Jenna 114 
Helmker. Abigail 91 
Helmker. Joanna 114 
Hemphill. Chad 68,72 
Hendnckson. Jerry 72 
Hengesh, Brittany 256, 257 
Henning, Kyle 91 
Henson, Kathenne 114. 152 
Hepler, Kara 91 
Herafh. Elena 91 
Herbert, Tessie 72 
Hernandez, Elias 114 
Hernandez, Laci 55 



Hess. Gina 114 
Hess. Joy 115 
Hess. Melinda 55 
Hetfieisch. Haley 115 
Hileman. Michael 15. 72. 222 
Hill, Allison 115 
Hill, Austin 19,68.72 
Hill. Jamie 91 
Hines. Adam 50. 55 
Hmes. David 91 
Hinkley, Jeffery 145 
Hinrichs, Christopher 115 
Hobson. Stephanie 91 
Hodges, Alexandria 115 
Hodson. Kyle 55 
Hoekstra, Shanna 91 
Hoffmann, David 72 
Hoffrage. Jorie 115 
Hogan, April 115 
Holaway, Bethany 91 
Holaway, Elisabeth 115 
Holden. Nicholas 245 
Holdham, Laura 91 
Hollis. Keisha 73 
Holmer. Katelyn 91.142 
Holmes. Gwendelyn 4. 91, 236 
Holmgren. Rachel 56 
Holm. Katrina 177 
Holt. Benjamin 115 
Holtz, Corey 73 
Home. Jennifer 91 
Horvaf, Desiree' 16 
Horvat, Zachary 19 
Hoskins. Alison 56 
Hoskms. Jacob 28. 91. 142 
Hotle, Bethany 91 
Hoving. Jeremy 91 
Howells. Joshua 73 
Howe. Rachel 92 
Hozian, Kathenne 92, 266 
Hubbell, Tyler 92 
Huddleston. Jadon 56. 149 
Huebner, Elizabeth 92 
Huffman, Keith Christian 115 
Hughes, Amber 56 
Hughes, Annastacia 56 
Hughes, John 92 
Hui, Benjamin 115, 140 
Huish, Jeremy 73 
Huizenga, Jonathon 115, 192 
Huntsman, Megan 2, 92 
Hurst, Matthew 115 
Hurt, Katrina 244 
Hurt. Keegan 115 
Hutchins. Bnanna 115 
Hutson, Taylor 115 
Hutton, Chamise 115 



Huyser, Maria 150,56 
Huyser. Matthew 92 



Icenogle. Mary Ann 115 

Imbery, Luke 115 

Imig, Michelle 56 

Im, Young 56,65,219 

Ingersol. Christopher 115, 201 

Iwema, Nathan 73 



J 



Jackson, Jordan 115 

Jackson, Lisa 56 

Jackson. Megan 92 

Jackson. Paul 56, 221 

Jackson, William 56 

Jamerson, Brooke 56 

James. William (3) 115 

Jansma, Stephanie 115 

Jarrett. Lindsey 56 

Javorka, Allison 115 

Jeffenes, Timothy 56 

Jenkins, Erica 115 

Jensen, Andrew 92 

Jensen, Christina 73 

Jensen. Cole 18. 21. 68, 73, 192, 274. 275 

Jensen. Sarah 92 

Jentz, Gloria 115 

Jerrick, Andrew 92 

Jin, Meiling 115,212 

Johnson. Austin 92. 172, 250 

Johnson. Heather 56 

Johnson, Karsti 115 

Johnson, Lauren 115 

Johnson, Lindsey 116 

Johnson, Logan 92 

Johnson, Matthew 56 

Johnson, Mitchell 14. 68. 73. 188, 189 

Johnson. Riley 116 

Johnson, Ross 106, 116, 189 

Johnson, Stephanie 56 

Johnson, Taylor 116 

Johnston, Devin 92. 257, 270, 271 

Jones, Jessica 256 

Jones, Lauren 92 

Jones, Marc 116,251 

Jones. Melinda 92, 226 

Joseph, Amanda 73 

Josma. Justine 116 

June, Hannah 92.187,189 

Jungles, Stephanie 56, 237 

Juodikis, Brandon 116 

Jurica, John 56 



K 



Kaburu. Isabella 213 

Kapambwe. Zipporah 56. 227 

Karas. Emily 56 

Karenke. Molly 92 

Karg. Evan 24. 56. 186. 187 

Karns, Caroll 92 

Karraker. Tyler 116 

Karrick. Jillian 92 

Kaufmann, Mitchell 56 

Kearney, Matthew 135 

Kearney. Rachel 26, 93. 190, 195. 270. 271 

Keckler. Michele 73 

Kee. Matthew 4. 50. 56. 65. 138, 211 

Keener, Lauren 93 

Kee, Ryan 116 

Kehl. Kristen 56.168 

Keiss. Autumn 116 
I Kellar. Nickolas 116.278 

Kellie. Molly 116 

Kellogg. Alex 116 

Kelly. Adnenne 56, 176 

Kelsey, Benjamin 116 

Kennedy. Kristin 116 

Kennedy. William 116 

Kennell. Adam 56 

Kenny, Katrma 116 

Kepler. Megan 93 

Kershaw, Jennifer 56 

Keys. Hannah 56 

Keys. Reynauldt 28. 29, 116 

Kidd, Rebekah 56 

Kilbry. Rachel 116.257 

Kim. Eunji 73 

Kimmel, Erica 73 

Kindle. Amanda 56 

King. Caitlyn 93 

King, Darcy 56,256,257 

King. Kirstie 56 

King, MacKenna 116 

King, Nicole 56. 64, 218. 220 

Kinnison, Bradley 116 

Kinnison, Danette 73 

Kinstle. Courtney 93 

Kirby. Gabnelle 93. 151 

Kirchner, Jeannette 56, 228 

Kirchner, Just yne 93 

Kirchner. Lmdsey 93, 223 

Kirkland, Faren 93 

Kirkpatrick. Matthew 73 

Kirkpatnck. Michael 106. 116 

Kirst. Laura 57 

Kirts. Jenna 57 
iKisoso. Queen 14, 116 

Klein, Nicole 57 

Klemm, Brandon 116. 189. 274 



Klepitsch. Kristin 116 

Klinefelter, Emily 93 

Kline, Joel 190,255 

Klomstad, Nicholas 29, 191, 268, 269 

Klossing. Ashley 57 

Klossing, Cherish 73 

Klossing, Megan 93 

Klumpe, Nathan 116 

Knapp, Ryan 73 

Kmzek, Crystal 116,253 

Knot Andrew 73 

Knox, Dayna 73 

Koch, Mary 93 

Koch, Tyler 116 

Koepsell, Cornne 57 

Kohlmeier, Zachary 93. 175 

Kolber. Bethany 57 

Koleczek, Molly 116 

Konopack, Laura 57 

Kooy, Jessica 143 

Korfas, Jessica 57 

Kosek, Brian 27, 57, 65. 195, 245 

Koury, Kayla 4, 41, 49, 57, 65, 67, 81, 105. 133. 149. 
161. 181. 188. 222. 228, 249 

Krajec, Matthew 206, 258, 259 

Kraker, Kelly 73 

Kratz, Kimberly 4, 14. 26. 32. 34. 93, 144. 153. 154, 
192. 202. 203, 210, 211. 220, 221, 226. 227, 
232, 241, 244, 245. 251. 262, 264. 267 

Krause. Kafhenne 24. 25. 57, 181 

Krause, Nathan 57 

Krawec, Nicole 57 

Krestan, Kendra 223 

Krestel, Samantha 57 

Krieger, Ethan 117 

Kronewitter, Ellen 117 

Kronsf, Molli 117 

Krop. Douglas 57 

Krueger, Steven 73 

Kruse. Hannah 73 

Kryger, Samantha 117 

Kryszyn, Thadeus 117 

Krzyzak, Alana 117 

Kulchar, Kathenne 57. 256, 257 

Kunde, Jenna 117 

Kunde, Josephine 117 

Kundrat, Tricia 57 

Kurtz, Lisa 93.178 

Kurtz, Michelle 93 

Kurz, Julian 262,263 

Kuzur, Kristen 117 



L 



LaCosse. Steven 117 
Laferney, Kylie 117 
LaFond. Nicole 117 



Lagacy. Murrell 117 

Lakms, Shelby 93 

Lalumendre, Abagail 21. 117 

Lalumendre, Megan 117 

Lamb. Felicia 57 

Lamb. Nikki 57 

Lamm. Alyssa 117 

Lancaster. Cassidy 93. 135 

Landers. Ashley 117 

Lane. Evan 117 

Langeland. Sarah 93, 211 

Langkamp, Mary Beth 94 

Lankford, Rebecca 73 

Lapenas, Kaylee 94 

Lappe, Austin 117, 242 

Lara. Areli 94 

Lara, Cory 117 

Lasowski, Kevin 94 

Latona, Carmen 117 

Laubenstein. Allison 117 

Lautenbach. Brenden 94 

Lautenbach. Kenneth 73 

Lawrence. Christy 74 

Layman, Kayla 94 

Leander, Ryan 94 

Leatherwood, Jake 117, 147 

Leavitt, Andrew 117 

Lee, Angela 57,228 

Leeseberg, Madison 117, 140, 172, 189, 193 

LeFevre. Christopher 236 

Leffel, Amber 117 

Leffew, Emily 117 

Legg, Jennifer 57 

Leibold, Rebecca 57 

Leidahl, Lauren 147 

Lengerich, Carlie 57 

Lewis, Emily 57 

Lewis. Jordan 74 

Lewis. Samantha 117 

Liakopoulos, Christina 74 

Liakopoulos, Stephanie 94 

Liechty. Derek 203 

Lightner, Kassie 117 

Light. Shelby 117 

Lillie, Reuben 33. 57. 236. 243 

Lindquist. Jessica 118 

Lindsay, Christina 253 

Lmgle. Ryan 94. 285 

Link, Aaron 251 

Linsner, Lydia 74 

Litras, Kira 118 , , 

Livingston, Leah 118 'I 1G0X 

Lockhart, Shatma 118 

Lockwood, Mark 57 



291 



Loeffler. Amy 57 

Logalbo, Joseph 94 

Logan. Ryan 185. 74 

Lomas. Brianna 94 

Lonberger. Marjone 57. 168 

London. Ryan 82 

Long. Joshua 17 

Long. Logan 118 

Long. Melody 118 

Loos. Kaitlin 94 

Lopez. Cynthia 57 

Lopez. Jessica 74 

Lord. Alexandria 18. 68. 74 

Lord. Jeremy 57 

Lorenz. Madelyn 118. 146 

Lorenz. Mary 94 

Loulousis. Melanie 74. 181 

Lourash. Autumn 94 

Love. Neil 57 

Love, Sarah 94 

Lowery. Rebecca 57 

Lowery, Seth 4. 21. 32, 33. 118. 206. 207. 239 

Lowry. Anne 57 

Lowry. Calla 58 

Lowry, Kyle 18, 34, 35, 74, 186, 187, 192. 207 

Lubben, Chelsea 94 

Luby. Amanda 32. 94 

Lucas, Morgan 118 

Lundmark. Alisha 58 

Lustig. Nicole 118 

Lyle. Jonathan 94 

Lyon. Cody 118 

Lyon. Michael 58 

M 

Madding. Lucas 95, 170 
Mahnke. Colin 118 
Maldonado Paige 118 
Maltese, Matthew 118 
Manchester, Sarah 58 
Manning, Blaine 74, 181 
Manning, Jessica 118. 141 
Mannor. Zachary 118 
Mann. Thomas 118 
Manolovits, Nicolas 118 
Mansfield, Katelyn 58 
Mantanan, Grace 58, 186, 187 
Marin. Shayna 74 
Marko, Britney 95 
Marquis, Michelle 74 
Marrier. Ashli 74 
Marrs, Heather 95 
Marrs, Sara 32,58 
Marshall, Antonio 268, 269 
Martin, ArieJIa 152 



Martin, Emily 58 
Martin, Jason 118 
Martin, Olivia 74 
Martinson. Trevor 118 
Martin, Taylor 95 
Maslan. Jeffrey 20,118 
Massengale, Andrew 58 
Mast. Casey 74 
Mast, Chris 58. 254, 255 
Mathias. Kristin 74 
Mafhison, Jared 118 
Matthews, Ian 74, 192 
Matthews. Joy 17,95 
Maupin, Rachel 95 
Mausehund, Matthew 58 
Mazzaro, Amanda 74, 194 
McCague, Laura 58 
McClellan, Justin 118 
McConnell, Elizabeth 34, 35, 58 
McCormack, Caitlin. 118. 153 
McCraren, Jacqueline 118 
McDaniel. Chad 251 
McDaniel. Hilary 58 
McDonald, Kathenne 58, 65 
McDowell, Emily 58 
McElroy, Katelin 58 
McGill, Kate 193 
McGraw, Cody 58,222 
McGreevy. Julie 58 
McGuire. Allison 210 
McGuire, Kylie 147 
McLaren, Joshua 147 
McLaughlin, Kelsey 58 
McPherson, Morgan 188 
McQueen, Travis 118 
Mead, Heather 106,118 
Means, Christopher 95 
Mellinger, Lucas 58 
Mercer, Jennifer 118 
Meredith, Bethany 95, 140, 223 
Merki, Philip 201 
Merry, Nicole 74 
Messenger, Laura 58, 149 
Messer, Morgan 95 
Metzger, Gabnelle 119 
Metzger, Sarah 58 
Meyer, Bethany 119, 234 
Meyer, Krystal 119 
Meyers, Alan 221 
Meyers, Brandi 58, 227 
Meyers. Stella 58 
Mezera. Jesse 173 
Michaels. David 75 
Miedema, Ryan 95 
Mikhail. Audrey 95 
Mikhail. Jonathan 236 
Milby, Hannah 119,213 



Miles, Aaron 258, 259 

Miller, Alan 119 

Miller, Amanda 28, 95, 140 

Miller, Andrew 58 

Miller, Ashley 119,260 

Miller, Benjamin 32 

Miller, Bethany 96 

Miller, Cory 58 

Miller, Hannah 119, 213 

Miller, Jom 75 

Miller, Katelyn 119 

Miller, Kyle 119 

Miller, Luke 119 

Miller, Mallory 119 

Miller, Michael 119 

Miller, Nicole 58 

Miller, Paige 119 

Miller, Richard 119 

Miller. Scott 119 

Miller, Stephen 75 

Miller. Zarah 58,205 

Milles, Casey 96 

Mills, Caitlin 119 

Mills. Jason 119 

Mmgus. Tyler 119 

Minnich. Nicholas 58 

Miranda, Shawn 75 

Mitchell, Alyssa 96 

Mitchell, Keith 119 

Mitchell, Matthew 58 

Mitchell, Matthew (3) 58 

Mitchell, Michelle 119 

Mitchell, Robert 119, 192 

Miulli, Vito 119 

Moberly. Trent 119 

Mohr, Nicholas 119 

Moisio, Rebecca 58 

Monkemeyer. Alison 96, 193 

Monkemeyer, Rachel 58, 65 

Montalbano, Nicole 119, 139, 144 

Moore, Allyse 58, 219 

Moore, Andrew 119 

Moore, Benjamin 4 

Moore. Colton 75.275 

Moore, Jacob 96 

Moore, James 119 

Moore. Kenneth 119 

Moore, Rachel 96 

Moore, Sarah 96 

Morales, Jelissa 59 

Morehead, Sydney 119 

Morehouse, Athma 75 

Morgan, Ariel 119 

Morgan, Ashley 59 

Morgan, Jacob 120 

Moriya, Hugo 59,262,263 

Morris, Alisa 68, 75, 216 



Morris. Rhandy! 120 
Mortensen. Ashley 96, 150 
Mosey. Jean 96 
Mount. Kathenne 120 
Mounts. Austin 259 
Mullen. David 120 
Munyon. Julianna 96 
Murphy. Patrick 96 
Murphy, Samantha 96 
Murray. James 18. 75. 154 
Murray. Kathleen 120 
Musselman. Rebekah 120 
Muzljakovich, Andrew 106 

N 

Nace. Evan 120 

Nadig. Lacee 120 

Naffziger, Ashley 120 

Naldi. Ian 29.75 

Naldi. Jacob 75.192 

Nardozzi. John 254. 255 

Nartey, Akosua 120 

Neeley. Leeanna 59. 176 

Neil. Michael 120.242 

Nelson. Aaron 120 

Nelson. Kathryn 59 

Nelson. Kelly 96.229 

Nelson. Kelsey 181 

Nelson. Ryan 75 

Neuman. John 120 

Newkirk, Jason 75 

Newlin. Kelsey 96 

Nichols. Brittany 120 

Nichols, Karyn 75.188 

Nichols, Kevin 59 

Nichols, Kristin 120. 188 

Nicholson. Joss 96 

Niebuhr. Anna 59 

Niederwimmer, Kirsten 96 

Nielson. Andrew 4. 5. 31. 120. 236 

Nixon, Holly 96 

Nixon, Lauren 120 

Nootbaar. Nicole 120 

Norden, Alyssa 96 

Nunez. Keith 75 

Nusbaumer, Morgan 120 

Nutter. Carl 120.201 

Nutter, John 75 

Nye, Gabriel 16 



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O'Brien. Desiree 120 
O'Brien. Nolan 120 
Oehmke, Charles 59 
Ohse. Emily 96 



Olds. Meagan 59 
Oliver. Andrew 166.229 
Oliver, Staci 75 
Olkoski, Ashlie 120 
Olson. Hope 120 
Olson, Steve 13.59 
O'Neill. Margaret 177 
O'Neill. Megan 120 
Onyett. Alex 59 
Orne, Linnea 97 
Osier. Melinda 120 
Ostrowski. Chense 59 
Oswalt, Gretchen 75 
Oswalt, Rachel 120 
Otte, Erik 97 
Outler, Kelsey 59 
Owens, Jacquelyn 59, 65 244 



Paarlberg, Michael 120 

Page. Ryan 120.188.189 

Palmer. Bradley 121.205 

Palmer. Daniel 75 

Palmer. Scott 121.167 

Palm. Jessica 35. 121 

Pals. Andrew 121 

Pals. Brittany 75. 224, 227 

Pals, Lindsey 59 

Papineau, Nicole 121 

Pare, Sarah 59 

Pargulski, Hannah 3, 16, 28, 97, 137. 138, 150, 155, 

187, 193, 198. 199, 218, 219, 228, 229, 233, 

236, 237. 252. 255. 260 
Park. Allison 75 
Parker. Alysson 28.152 
Parker. Colton 121 
Parker. David 97.192 
Parker, Emily 121 
Parker, Joshua 121 
Parker, Sara 97 
Parks, Makenzie 121 
Parpart, Sean 121 
Parsons, David 21,29.75 
Pascarella. Emily 97 
Patino. Nancy 170.191 
Patrick, Freya 97 
Patterson, Joshua 121 
Patterson, Paige 121. 164 
Paulsen, Jordan 75 
Pavlik, Heather 75 
Payne, Donte 75, 162, 212 
Payne, Elise 121 
Peachey, Isaiah 97 
Peachey. Kyle 59.222 
Pearson, Vanessa 35, 76 



Pelletier, Whitney 97 

Pendry. Austin 121 

Penrod, Audrey 76.179 

Perez, Adrian 121 

Perigo, Megan 121 

Perkins. Morgan 121 

Pern. Nick 121 

Perry, Seth 82.97 

Peterson, Dana 97 

Peterson, John 121. 202 

Peterson. Lindsey 121. 264. 265 

Peterson. Molly 121 

Peugh. Kathryn 76.228 

Peulausk, Elisabeth 59 

Pflederer, Holly 76,176 

Phelps. Denita 26.270 

Phillips. James 97,197 

Phipps, Rebecca 193 

Pickett. Jamie 121, 162 

Picone. David 76 

Pierce, Jana 76. 204 

Pierce, Josh 121 

Pierson, Antony 121 

Pierson. Farns 59 

Piggush, Ashley 59 

Pigman, Jeffery 121 

Pilcher. Bethany 121 

Pimpo. Samuel 121 

Pioch. Matthew 275 

Piotrowski. Michael 121 

Pipal. Danielle 26, 76. 190. 270 

Pipal. Meghan 29. 177, 257 

Piper, Martin 121 

Pitzer, Ashley 97 

Pivarunas, Cecilia 121 

Pleasant, Abby 24,59 

Plese. Jenna 76 

Poe, Christina 76 

Polatas. Taylor 82. 97. 151 

Polley. Michael 59 

Pollock. Alex 122 

Polsley. Megan 97 

Pond. Elisabeth 76.168 

Ponsetto, Kathenne 122 

Ports, Sean 97 

Potts. Nicole 122 

Poucher. Jeffrey 59 

Powell. Jacob 122 

Powers. Kimberly 122 

Powers. Marcus 97. 200 

Powers, Thomas 76. 272 i nr J~ v 

Powers. Travis 59.207 HlGeX 

Prestia, Rico 122 OQQ 

Preston. Amy 59 Z-^)Z^ 



Price. Amanda 122 
Price. Amy 76 
Price, Melissa 97 
Primrose. Jacob 122 
Prince. Morgan 122 
Pritchett. Martin 59. 169. 251 
Proehl. Ermn 20. 151. 189 
Prude. Benjamin 122 
Puroll. Jaclyn 76 



Ouandt, John 50, 59. 185, 190. 207 
Ouinlin, Sarah 59 



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Rachan. Steve 122 

Radcliffe. Megan 97 

Radzimanowski. Morgan 20, 194, 275 

Raffauf. Ashley 2, 5. 97, 236 

Ragon, Brennan 59 

Rairden. Olivia 122 

Ramirez. Joel 14. 59. 154. 241 

Ramirez. Lindsey 122. 164 

Ramsay. Meagan 98, 206. 264. 265 

Ramsey, Remington 59 

Rankin, Diane 2. 68. 76. 237 

Rapacki. Kristin 122 

Rasmussen. Travis 98 

Ratliff, Amy 122 

Ratthahao, Billy 17.59 

Rawlings. Jessica 98 

Raynor. Rachel 122.266 

Reader. Adam 76 

Reames. Luverta 76 

Recker. Taylor 122 

Reddick. Blake 59 

Redman. Tracy 156 

Redwme. McKenzie 252 

Reed, Allison 76.142 

Reed, Anna 98 

Reed, Bethany 122 

Reed, Bradley 59,201 

Reed, Miley 98 

Reed, Rebecca 122 

Reedy, Angela 60 

Reeverts, Kolton 98 

Reichelt, Heidi 122 

Reid, Andrew 122 

Reierson, Jennifer 15, 60 157 

Reilly, William 98 

Remhardt, Jacqueline 60 

Reinsma, Nicole 122 

Reisinger, Justin 76 



Reiter, Alexander 122 

Remy, Elveka 122 

Reutter, Emma 15 

Reyes, Paul 168 

Reynolds, Jordan 76 

Reynolds. Matthew 60 

Rhodes. Nichole 76. 174 

Rhule, Rachel 60.162 

Rice, David 32,122 

Richards, Kristin 122 

Richardson, Andrea 76. 167 

Richardson, Heidi 76, 176 

Richardson, Knstina 122 

Richey, Michael 122 

Richey. Michelle 122 

Richmond. Allison 2 

Ridenour. Jacob 82 

Rideout. Charles 60.268 

Riegle. Carrie 18. 76 

Riley, Lorisha 122 

Rinehart, Kristin 98 

Ring, Joshua 98,239 

Ringo, Austin 123 

Ripberger. Alex 77. 186. 187. 192 

Ripberger. Max 106,123 

Rittmeyer. Nathanael 123 

Rivas. Angela 15. 77, 188 

Rivett, Elise 98 

Roberson. McKenzi 123 

Roberts. Kirsten 60 

Robins. Bnanna 60 

Robins. Meagan 60 

Robinson. Cara 60 

Robinson. Kayla 60 

Robinson, Peter 98 

Robison, Katrina 123 

Robison, Merrick 5, 26. 27. 30, 31, 60, 244 

Robyn, Brandon 123 

Robyn, Knsta 77 

Roche, Janalis 123 

Roche. Janina 123 

Rock, Ariel 123 

Rodeheaver, Rebecca 154 

Rodriguez. Vanessa 123 

Roesel. Jeremy 98 

Roesslein. Emily 123 

Rogers, Rebekah 98 

Rokey, Brian 123 

Rolfe. Brooke 123 

Rolling, Kayla 66. 67. 77. 186. 193, 203, 206 

Rose, Jacqueline 98 

Rosenberg, Cherise 77 

Rothen. Andrew 123 

Rowen. Hannah 123. 189, 260 

Rubin, Kristina 60 

Ruddle, Jessica 60 

Ruddle, Zachary 123 



Ruff, Beth 77 
Runyan, Heather 123 
Runyan, Renee 123, 238, 239 
Rupert. Madison 123 
Rupert. Randall 60 
Rush. Bethany 123 
Rust, Chnssy 60 
Ryan. Jacob 123 
Rybolt, Kyle 77 
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Saewert, Paula 98 

Salem, Jacob 98 

Saliba, Edward 123 

Salvaoon, Jonathan 123 

Salzman, Erin 50 60. 188, 190 

Sanchez, Aline 77 

Sanchez, Josue 98, 263 

Sandefur, Jamie 60 

Sanders, Thomas 123 

Sanor, Lucas 98 

Santiago, Olivia 60 

Sassano. Victor 123 

Sauter, Geoff 77 

Sawdon, Christy 98 

Sayre, Andrew 123 

Schaack, Emily 77 

Schaack, Mary 98 

Schacht, Holly 26,270 

Schaffer, Alyssa 123 

Schaver, Rebecca 123 

Scheiterle, Darnell 123 

Scheller. Jerry 24, 28. 60 65. 186, 191, 196 

Schewe, Jessica 60, 181 

Schick, Adam 60, 185, 187. 188, 189, 190 

Schiefelbein, Angela 60 

Schimke, Greg 124 

Schimmelpfenmg, Daley 124 

Schimp, Michael 13.60 

Schindel, Daniel 60,210 

Schindel, Joseph 82. 99. 167. 186, 189, 206 

Schmdler, Lukas 80.81 

Schlegel. Clarissa 99 

Schmelzer, Anne 60 

Schmidt, Hannah 99 

Schmidt, Jacob 19, 77. 147 

Schmidt, Tara 60,267 

Schmitt, Janel 256 

Schmitz, Andrew 60 222 

Schneider, Megan 124 

Schoenwetter, Jennifer 99 

Schooler, Jeremiah 124 

Schrader, Katharyn 124. 144 

Schueman, Stephanie 99 

Schuldt, Alexis 124 



Schulfz. Kaitlin 99.178 


Smith, Logan 124 




Schultz. Katelyn 99 


Smith. Mario 124 




Schutt. Catherine 77. 210 


Smith. Matthew 18. 100, 201 




Schuyler. Brittany 60 


Smith. Nathaniel 124 




Schwartz. Paige 99 


Smith. Olivia 124 




Schwerm. Laitin 124 


Smith. Taylor 124.261 


Stevens. Bryan 16. 78. 144. 187. 188. 206 


Scott. Chris 99 


Smith, Travis 61 


Stevens, Emily 125 


Scott. Hannah 77 


Smit, James 77 


Stevens, Krisfen 100 


Scott. Maya 28 


Sokarda, Knstme 61, 205 


Steward, Alexandra 100 


Scott. Rachel 60 


Solares, Edson 100.202 


Stewart, Rebekah 100 


Scruggs. Brittany 60. 223 


Soller, Kaleb 100, 175, 242 


Stoffel. Amber 125 


Segraves, Kimberly 99 


Song, Brandon 124 


Stoffel. Michael 125 


Seidl. Stephanie 99 


Sorensen, Christopher 61 


Stokell, Lisa 125 


Sendzik. Cheryl 124 


Sorenson, Faith 77 


Stone. Clara 100 


Settle. Brenna 60 


Soukup, Amanda 61 


Stone. Joshua 78 


Sevigny. Garrett 77. 274 


Southard, Raven 124 


Stone. Nicole 100 


Seymour, Shawn 124 


Southe, Dustin 100 


Stonitsch, Mark 192 


Shaddick. Megan 124 


Southerland, Rebekah 124 


Storey. Reece 125 


Shaner. Lauren 124 


Southerland, Shara 28, 68, 77 


Story, Ann 209 


Shankster. Leah 60 


South, Kayla 61,216 


Stott, Tama 61,210 


Shattuck. Cassandra 77 


Sowards, Kelsey 233 


Strait, Benjamin 278 


Shaughnessy. Kyle 99 


Sowards, Tyler 124 


Strange, Danielle 100 


Shaw. Grant 18 


Spainhour, Meredith 78 


Streets, Brandon 268, 269 


Shelton. Emily 60 


Spear. Jonathan 124 


Streff, Rachael 61 


Shelton. Kyle 99 


Speas. Chelsea 100 


Streicher, Lauren 100 


Shickles. Laura 99 


Speer. Michael 124 


Strickler, Ashlee 61 


Shilvock, Sarah 60 


Spencer, Blake 124 


Strombeck, Andrew 61, 233 


Shirosky. Molly 99 


Spence. Rebecca 145 


Strothmann, Stefanie 125 


Shoffstall. John 77 


Spencer. Michelle 106 


Stultz, Benjamin 125 


Shonamon, Justin 61 


Spinnie. Nathan 124 


Sturgeon, Jessica 125 


Shore. Tyler 77 


Spitzke. Victoria 124 


Sturm. Shelby 125 


Short, Hannah 28.77 


Sprague, Wesley 61, 169 


Sunberg. Cara 61. 139. 179 


Shreves, Jonathan 225 


Sprik, Emily 125 


Swanson. Blake 101 


Shrout. Ryan 82.99 


Spunaugle, Emily 78, 228 


Sweeney. Krisfi 61 


Shull-Dunn. Raven 124 


Stachewicz, Kyle 106, 125 


Sweet, Caitlin 78 


Siadak. Stephanie 61 


Staley, Michael 61,171 


Swickard. Alexander 101, 166 


Sidler. Daniel 61 


Stanford, Jesse 125 


Swick. Whitney 101, 206, 260. 261 


Sims, Anthony 61 


Staniszeski, Nicole 78 


Swihart. Amy 28. 78 


Sinn, Sarah 77.188 


Stark, Jeffrey 3,217,61 


Swindle. Tyler 125 


Sinwelski, Lauren 61 


Stark, Jeremiah 125 


Syfsma. Bradley 4.30.61 j 


Sipe, Emily 61 


Stark, Landon 100 




Sirois, Kelcie 99 


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Starner, Samantha 100 




Sitton. Kara 124 


St Aubm, Tayler 157 


Tabb, Matthew 125 


Siwinski, Catherine 99 


Stauffenberg. Jordan 100 


Takacs. Katie 125 


Skelton. Knsta 77 


Stebbins, Amsley 125 


Talbott. Grace 125 


Skelton, Stacey 61 


Steelman, Katie 125 


Tannehill. Justin 101 


Skrbec. Kaccey 99 


Steen. Rachel 78 


Tanner. Melissa 78 


Slade, Kristopher 124 


Steines, Kelsey 125 


Tapp, Carrie 78 


Slager. Kelsey 124 


Stephansen, Sarah 78 


Tarr, Aimee 176 


Sloan. Nicole 29.100 


Stephansen, Timothy 181 


Tawel, Clarissa 125 


Smallegan, Victoria 100 


Stephens, Molly 125 


Taylor, Brooklyn 61 


Smarrella, Joshua 124 


Stephens, Taylor 100, 264 


Taylor, Gregory 125 


Smith, Colton 201 


Sterns, Rebeckah 61 


Taylor, Hannah 20,125 

Taylor, Kadeem 125 IfldGX 


Smith, Ian 61 


Steveley, Adam 61, 64, 203 


Smith, Kaitlin 77 


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Temelcoff. Gma 78 
Temple. Malik 167 
Terpstra. Erica 125 
Terry. Keenan 125 
Teske, Jaimie 125, 253 
Tharp, Christyn 61 
Tharp, Dallas 61 
Theede, Kameron 101 
Theis. Anna 101 
Thill. John 125 
Thomas, Brittany 61 
Thomas, Cambria 78, 152 
Thomas. Timothy 101 
Thomas. Zachary 101, 245 
Thompson, Andrew 126 
Thompson, Ashley 78 
Thompson, Brianna 126 
Thompson. Kristin 78. 187. 188. 1 
Thompson. Kyle 101 
Thompson. Marcie 101. 252 
Thompson. Nicole 126 
Thome, Kaitlynn 61 
Thrall. Elizabeth 101 
Tillman. Victoria 61 
Timmer. Bntny 126 
Tobias. Lmdsey 126 
Tolbert, Christopher 155, 212 
Tolbert, Danielle 271 
Tollenaar, Katharine 101 
Tolley, Kayla 126 
Toms, Blaire 126 
Toporek, Sarah 126, 157 
Toppmeyer, Melanie 101 
Torrey, Danek 62 
Toumear, Sarah 126 
Tower, Jason 19 
Towle, Michelle 126 
Tracy, Joshua 78 
Trank. Carl 78,211 
Trank. Christy 106.126 
Travnik. Jaclyn 199 
Treleven, Ouinn 101 
Tripp, Kelly 126 
Trisilla, Nina 62 
Troglio. Alexis 62 
Tschetter. Rachel 2,101 
Tulu. Muluneh 62 
Tures, Katherine 126 
Turner, Ariel 126 
Turner, David 78 
Tusack, Jacklyn 126 
Tuttle. Michael 50, 62, 224 



Ulatowski, Chanteil 126 
Ulrich, David 78 
Unger, Heidi 101 
Uthaiwat, Olivia 101 



U 



Uhey. Sarah 126 



V 



Valpatic, Jennifer 101 

Van Deneede, Monica 126 

Van Der Dyke, Joy 126 

Vanderpool, Amanda 62 

Van Donselaar. Kafy 62 

Van Dyke. Matthew 16, 199 

Van Kuiken, Christopher 126 

Van Milligan, Amber 126 

VanSyckle, Kerry 126 

Vargas, Julissa 53, 126, 209 

Vaughn, Hillary 127 

Venhuizen, Keith 62 

Versweyveld, Jillian 102 

Versweyveld. Lauren 62 

Vickey, Craig 62 

Victor, Jeffrey 127 

Victorson, Arthur 127 

Volz, Caiflin 127 

Von Arb, Rachel 165 

Voss, Jessica 78. 204 

Vrabel, Allyson 18, 31, 127. 141. 143. 146. 151. 156, 18 

190. 197, 200, 201, 216, 217. 224. 225. 235, 

242, 243, 268, 274 
Vroegh. Doug 127, 258. 259 
Vroman. Jayna 62 

w 

Waage. Rachel 62 

Wade. Carly 127 

Wade. Emily 79 

Wagner, Caylee 102 

Wainwnght, Caroline 62 

Waite, Kasey 62 

Walburg, Celeste 127 

Waldvogel. Alanna 79 

Walker, Elizabeth 102, 260 261 

Walker, Jason 127 

Walker. Kyle 62 

Walker. Rebecca 127 

Wallace, Mathew 62 

Wallace, Matthew 202 

Wall. Christian 19 

Wallek. Jordan 256 

Wallem, Crystal 127 

Waller. Nathaniel 79 

Wallm. Victoria 171 

Walsh, Allison 127 

Walsh, Kevin 62 

Walters, Emily 79 

Walton, Sarah 102 



Waltz, Rachel 79 
Wangler, Kathryn 62 
Wangler, Nicholas 48. 49, 62 
Ward. Ember 62.162 
Ward. Jennifer 30, 31. 127. 205 
Ward. Sarah 102 
Ward, Thomas 127 
Warner, Sara 102 
Warp, Kelsey 256,257 
Washington, Marcus 127 
Waskow, Emily 79, 200 
Watson, Heidi 32,127 
Watson, Jamie 127 
Watson, Kelsey 102 
Watson. Paige 62 
Wayteck. Laura 62 
Weaver, Anna 24, 25, 26, 62 
Webb, James 127 
Weber. Christine 127 
Weber. Jeremy 127 
Weber, Joseph 79 
Weber. Rachel 127. 177 
Weeden, Nathan 62 
Weeks, Adam 127 
Wegley, Lauren 62, 144 
Weiderman, Todd 79 
Weisel. Abigail 62 
Weitzel. Hannah 102,147 
Wells, Daniel 127 
Wells, Matthew 79 
Wells, Whitney 127 
Wendell, Samantha 128 
Wenzelman. Seth 128 
West. Blake 128 
Westerfi eld, Aaron 62,221 
Westrate, Taylor 128 
Whalen, Bryan 62 
White, Elizabeth 79, 144, 200 
White. Jennifer 102 
White, Kathryn 128 
Whitten. Sarah 79 
Widecan, Ethan 79 
Wiennga. Corrine 102 
Wiese, Nicholas 128 
Wikoff, Kendra 128.172 
Wiley. Jenna 79 
Wilke, Lisabeth 102.164 
Wilkins, Alyssa 102,171 
Wilkinson, Rebecca 128 
Wille, Megan 79 
Williams, Alicia 102 
Williams. Angela 62. 79, 173 
Williams, Angela (3) 62 
Williams, Austin 128 
Williams, Bryant 102 
Williams. Derek 128 
Williams. Devin 62 



Williams. Hannah 30. 31. 128 
Williams. John 128 
Williams. Jon 62 
Williams. Landon 128. 262. 263 
Williams. Laura 128 
Williamson. Janessa 128 
Williamson. Jordan 128 
Williamson. Taylor 102 
Williams. Rachel 128 
Williams. Rebecca 102 
Williams. Stephanie 79. 162 
Willoughby. Brian 128 
Willoughby. Heather 79 
Wilson. Alexia 229 
Wilson. Bethani 62 
Wilson. Catherine 62 
Wilson. Christen 62 
Wilson, Jennifer 103 
Wilson. Katherme 103 
Wilson. Matthew 103.225 
Windberg. Steven 63 
Wingate. Emily 128 
Winkle. Amanda 242 
Winn. Chelsea 63 
Winston, Christopher 128 
Winters. Anna 128 
Winters, Lauren 128 
Wiseman. Allison 103. 244 
Wiseman. Kelsey 63 
Wittmer. Julie 63.176 
Wolf. Cody 129 
Wonch. Seth 129 
Wood. Dianna 103 
Wood. Emily 103 
Woodhull. Andrew 103, 258 
Wood, Joseph 63 
Woods, Brittany 63 
Workman, Anson 63 
Worner, Benjamin 103. 268 
Worrall, Kaitlyn 129 
Wright. Megan 79 
Wright, Paul 129 
Wuske, Samanfha 129 
Wyman, KimPerly 103 
Wynstra, Emily 63 

I Y 

YaPsley. Knsfa 79 
Yates, Nicole 129 
Yates, RePecca 103.225 
Yergler, Konssa 103 
Yoder, Emily 103 
York, Bnttmy 63.252 
Young, Ashley 63 
Young, Catherine 234 
Younglove, Emily 79 



Younglove, Kayla 129 
Young. Meredith 63.152 
Young, Samanfha 63 



Zajkowski, Ewelina 129 
Zajkowski, Magdalena 79 
Zak, Kaly 129 
Zarbuck, Danae 79 
Zarembski, Megan 129 
Zaring, Michael 242 
Zeilenga, Bailey 103 
Zelhart, Sarah 38, 68. 79. 186, 194 
Zimmer, Olivia 129 
Zizic, Briana 129 
Zizic, Nicole 63 
Zlomke, Matthew 129 
Zweizig, Meribeth 129 
Zwolinski, Ben 79 







Index 

297 



IN 



111 
II 







i-^k 





Philippians 3:13-14 
(The Message) 



I'm not saying that I have 
this all together that I have 
made. But I am well on my way, 
reaching out for Christ, who has 
so wondrously reached out for 
me. Friends, don't get me wrong: 
By no means do I count myself 
an expert in all of this, but I've 
got my eye on the goat where 
God is beckoning us onward-fo 
Jesus. I'm off and running, 
and I'm not turning 
back. 



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Follow Your Dream 
by Amanda Bradley 



Follow your dream. 

Take one step at a time and don't settle 

for less, 

Just continue to climb. 

Follow your dream. 

If you stumble, don't stop and lose sight of 

your goal 

Press to the top. 

For only on top can we see the whole view, 

Can we see what we've done and what we 

can do; 

Can we then have the vision to seek 

something new, 

Press on. 

Follow your dream. 



I 




I would fl rst like to thank God, for all the 
blessings You have bestowed upon me. I 
I have trusted in You more than ever this 
year and I thank You tor being with me ev- 
ery step of the way. 

My family: for your constant love and 
support in everything I've ever done. I don't 
know where I'd be without all of you. I am 
truly blessed to have such a wonderful 
family. I love you all very muchl 

Evan, Grace. Jerry, Jessica, Alex. Jor- 
dan. Kayla. Kyle and Shane : it was such 
an honor serving on the Executive council 
with all of you this year. From our f rst trip 
together in Nashville to our last meeting as 
a council. I have loved every minute with 
you guys and we truly became like a fam- 
ily, "hanks for your constant prayers, sup- 
port and keeping a smile on my face on 
some of the most stressful days. I have 
been blessed to have you in my life, love 
all you guys! 

My friends: for always being there for 
me when I needed to vent and just get 
out of the office. For keeping me smiling 
and laughing on the roughest days and 
just being there for me whenever I need 
you. God has blessed me with some truly 
wonderful friends' 

Casey : for having faith in me to take 
over as Editor. I cannot thank you enough 
for being there with all my questions (I 
think we may have the longest Facebook 
message feed ever) and asking how the 
yearbook was coming along. You were a 
great Editor and are such a good friend. 
Thanks for everything! 

Amber: I'm so glad you were our Advisor 
this yearl You were there for me and the 
executives on editing nights, you came to 
all our meetings and helped me whenever 
I needed you. Thanks for your reassuring 
words that everything would turn out for 
the best and having faith in me. it's been 
great working with you Amber, thanks for 
all you do! 



Alyssa: for all your wonderful designs 
as Executive Designer. Your vision for this 
book is wonderful and it wouldn't have 
fumed out so well without your talent 
and hard work. It's been a blast getting to 
know you and I'll never forget all our won- 
derful conversations and laughter about 
episodes of F.R.I.E.N.D.S. Thanks for every- 
thing Alyssa, I truly appreciate it! 

Brent: I have no idea what I would've 
done without youl Thanks so much for be- 
ing Executive Photographer this year! You 
have such a talent and passion for pho- 
tography and your work shows it. Thanks 
for helping me with anything I needed 
and keeping me laughing, you are a great 
friend. 

Kayla: I am so glad you came back to 
be Executive Writer again this year. Your 
organization and assistance has been such 
a blessing and your writing is truly won- 
derful. It's been great getting to spend 
this year working with you and I can't 
thank you enough for all your hard work 
and dedication! I never could've done this 
without you. 

Amanda, Emily, Jenna and Shanna : for 
all your hard work designing the pages 
and placing countless numbers of photos. 
I couldn't have picked a better team. This 
book looks amazing due to your attention 
to detail and dedication. It's been a blast 
getting to work with you ladies. 

Cassidy, Cassie, Chad, Kelli. Morgan and 
Tim: you guys are so awesomel The pho- 
tos in this book truly show all your hard 
work and dedication to the yearbook and 
it wouldn't have been completed without 
you. Thank you so much for taking end- 
less amounts of photos and pressing on 
even with the most stressful deadlines! 
You never let me down and your photos 
are wonderful. I've enjoyed every minute 
working with you guys. 



Ally, Hannah, Kim and Staci: I have loved 
working with you girls. You were so much 
fun and did a fantastic job on your sto- 
nes. Even in the most stressful moments, 
you pulled through and made sure you put 
your best work into each and every story. 
I'm so glad you all were on staff this year. 

Danek and Lauren: you two did such a 
great job on adsl Danek, thanks so much 
for all your organization and time send- 
ing out the letters to churches for ads and 
keeping everything up to date with checks 
and the budget. It was great having you 
back on staff and I missed you second 
semester. Lauren, thank you so much for 
faking the position of ads designer. You 
did a wonderful job and you have a gift 
for design. It's been great getting to know 
youl Thanks for everything. 

Woody and Kathy: for all your support 
of the Aurora and for all the guidance and 
advice you have given me. I am blessed 
to have you in my life and I thank you for 
everything you do to make Olivet such a 
wonderful place. God bless! 

Valerie and Walsworth: for all the an- 
swers to my endless list of questions and 
concerns. You were always there to reas- 
sure me that everything would be all right 
and for helping me out when things didn't 
go as planned. It was wonderful working 
with you in high school and I'm so glad I 
could continue working with you in col- 
lege. I don't know what I would've done 
without you Val and your wonderful team 
at Walsworth. 



Thank You 

303 



- 




Sarah Zelhart, 
Executive Editor 



Alyssa Cramer, 
Executive Designer 



Brent Brooks, 

Executive Photographer 



Kayla Koury, 
Executive Writer 



Danek Torrey, 
Business Manager 



Amber Olney, 
Advisor 



Design Team 
Jenna Engelsen 
Emily Hay 
Shanna Hoekstra 
Amanda Mazzaro 



Photography Team 
Cassie Brainard 
Kelli Brown 
Chad Hemphill 
Cassidy Lancaster 

Morgan Radzimanowski 
Tim Stephansen 



Writing Team 
Staci Bradbury 
Kim Kratz 
Hannah Pargulski 
Allyson Vrabel 



Advertisements Editor 
Lauren Shaner 



The 98th Olivet Nazarene University Aurora was created by a student staff and printed by Walsworth Publishing 
Company of Marceline, MO. Valerie Tanke was the sales representative and Michelle Brosemer was the service represen- 
tative. The press run was 2100. Pages were completed on Apple computers using Adobe InDesign CS3. Copy was writ- 
ten and edited by the Aurora staff. Additional photos were provided by The Image Group and the Office of Marketing 
Communications. The entire cover is printed in 4-color on gloss laminate with embossing on the front cover. The cover 
was designed by Alyssa Cramer. Endsheets are printed with two spot colors. Introduction and conclusion pages were 
designed by Alyssa Cramer and copy was written by Kayla Koury. Paper stock throughout the entire book is 100# 
gloss. Headlines, body copy, caption copy and folio copy is Ode Fina. Portraits were taken by Jim McAdams of MJM 
Photography, 110 North 800 East, Greentown, IN 46936. 

Inquiries regarding the book should be directed to the Aurora, Olivet Nazarene University, One University Av- 
enue, Box 6025, Bourbonnais, L 60914, or 815-939-5337. 



Executive Team 



Design Team 



Photography Team 




Writing Team 



Business and Ads Team 



Colophon 

304 



Walsworth 



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